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Health Law and Policy Commons

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University of Richmond

AIDS

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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

The Duty To Treat Asymptomatic Hiv-Positive Patients Or Face Disability Discrimination Under Abbott V. Bragdon: The Scylla And Charybdis Facing Today's Dental And Health Care Providers, Lisa Taylor Hudson Jan 1999

The Duty To Treat Asymptomatic Hiv-Positive Patients Or Face Disability Discrimination Under Abbott V. Bragdon: The Scylla And Charybdis Facing Today's Dental And Health Care Providers, Lisa Taylor Hudson

University of Richmond Law Review

Imagine yourself in the following scenario. You are an experienced dentist with a small private practice, and you routinely accept new patients and referrals. One of your long-time patients is scheduled for a routine tooth cleaning and dental examination. You make every effort to keep updated documentation on your patients, and in that pursuit, you request that the. patient complete a basic written health questionnaire. In the section relating to medications and relevant medical history, the patient reveals that she is taking medications for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome ("AIDS"),' and that she has tested positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus ("HIV-positive").


Medical Use Of Marijuana: Legal And Ethical Conflicts In The Patient/Physician Relationship, Matthew W. Grey Jan 1996

Medical Use Of Marijuana: Legal And Ethical Conflicts In The Patient/Physician Relationship, Matthew W. Grey

University of Richmond Law Review

Kenneth Jenks was born a hemophiliac, inheriting the condi- tion from his mother. He contracted the HIV virus from a blood transfusion in 1980 and unknowingly passed the virus to his wife, Barbara Jenks. Mrs. Jenks was the first to suffer the effects of the illness. Her weight dropped by nearly forty pounds in three weeks due to constant debilitating nausea, and she was repeatedly hospitalized for two- to three-week stretches. Mrs. Jenks tried a half-dozen different oral medications for nausea to no avail, and could not function after shots for nausea left her in a stupor. Mr. Jenks experienced ...


Blood Bank And Blood Products Manufacturer Liability In Transfusion-Related Aids Cases, Dana J. Finberg Jan 1992

Blood Bank And Blood Products Manufacturer Liability In Transfusion-Related Aids Cases, Dana J. Finberg

University of Richmond Law Review

Can a blood bank or a blood products manufacturer be held liable if a patient contracts AIDS through a transfusion of blood or a blood product? And, if so, should the bank or manufacturer be held liable? As of February 1989, approximately 200 cases touching on this issue were pending in the United States.


A Hospital's Dilemma: The Legal Implications Of Promulgating Guidelines Concerning Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Leonard C. Heath Jr. Jan 1988

A Hospital's Dilemma: The Legal Implications Of Promulgating Guidelines Concerning Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Leonard C. Heath Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

Fear has struck the workplace. The source of this fear is not lack of job security, inflation, recession or a concern about the United States' trade imbalance. The source of the fear is a disease--Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-and the virus that causes AIDS, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).


Aids, Health-Care Workers, And Workers' Compensation In Virginia, M. Grey Sweeney Jan 1988

Aids, Health-Care Workers, And Workers' Compensation In Virginia, M. Grey Sweeney

University of Richmond Law Review

The recent explosion of medical malpractice litigation has heralded the era of defensive medicine. Health-care professionals at all levels of the industry have been forced to evaluate both the lawsuit potential as well as the life sustaining potential of every act and treatment.' Since 1981, however, the threat of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has added a third, more threatening, perspective to the way health-care workers must view their actions. The average doctor or nurse must balance not only the medical and legal significance of every action, but must also consider whether an action might result in exposure to AIDS.