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Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Medicine and Health Sciences

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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski Jul 2016

Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In the past decade, medical tourism-the travel of patients across borders to receive medical treatment-has undergone unprecedented growth, fueled by the globalization of health care and related industries. While medical tourism can benefit patients through increased access to treatment and cost-savings, medical travel also raises concerns about ensuring quality of care and legal redress in medical malpractice. Moreover, existing regulations fail to address these unprecedented issues. The multilateral adoption of an International Constitution of Patient Rights (ICPR) is necessary in order to more effectively preserve medical tourism's benefits and guard against its risks.


Getting What We Should From Doctors: Rethinking Patient Autonomy And The Doctor-Patient Relationship, Roger B. Dworkin Jan 2003

Getting What We Should From Doctors: Rethinking Patient Autonomy And The Doctor-Patient Relationship, Roger B. Dworkin

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Changing Attitudes Toward Euthanasia, Alice V. Mehling Oct 1975

Changing Attitudes Toward Euthanasia, Alice V. Mehling

IUSTITIA

Death is a very individual matter which does not readily lend itself to collective decision. Medical ethicists frequently conclude that to allow a person to die from malice is more reprehensible than to help a person to die from mercy. The most striking change which is taking place in consideration of the problem is recognition of the need to reinforce the patient's right to decide on the course of medical treatment.

A New York Times editorial of February 3, 1903 condemned the practice of active euthanasia by comparing it to "practices of savages in all parts of the world ...