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Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

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Articles 1 - 30 of 187

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Money That Costs Too Much: Regulating Financial Incentives, Kristen Underhill Jul 2019

Money That Costs Too Much: Regulating Financial Incentives, Kristen Underhill

Indiana Law Journal

Money may not corrupt. But should we worry if it corrodes? Legal scholars in a range of fields have expressed concern about “motivational crowding-out,” a process by which offering financial rewards for good behavior may undermine laudable social motivations, like professionalism or civic duty. Disquiet about the motivational impacts of incentives has now extended to health law, employment law, tax, torts, contracts, criminal law, property, and beyond. In some cases, the fear of crowding-out has inspired concrete opposition to innovative policies that marshal incentives to change individual behavior. But to date, our fears about crowding-out have been unfocused and amorphous ...


The Global Person: Pig-Human Embryos, Personhood, And Precision Medicine, Yvonne Cripps Jul 2018

The Global Person: Pig-Human Embryos, Personhood, And Precision Medicine, Yvonne Cripps

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

Chimeras, in the form of pig-human embryos engineered by CRISPR-Cas9 and other biotechnologies, have been created as potential sources of organs for transplantation. Against that background, and in an era of "precision medicine," this Article examines the concept of the global genetically modified person and asks whether humanness and personhood are being eroded, or finding new boundaries in intellectual property and constitutional law.


Why Exempting Negligent Doctors May Reduce Suicide: An Empirical Analysis, John Shahar Dillbary, Griffin Edwards, Fredrick E. Vars Apr 2018

Why Exempting Negligent Doctors May Reduce Suicide: An Empirical Analysis, John Shahar Dillbary, Griffin Edwards, Fredrick E. Vars

Indiana Law Journal

This Article is the first to empirically analyze the impact of tort liability on suicide. Counter-intuitively, our analysis shows that suicide rates increase when potential tort liability is expanded to include psychiatrists—the very defendants who would seem best able to prevent suicide. Using a fifty-state panel regression for 1981 to 2013, we find that states which allowed psychiatrists (but not other doctors) to be liable for malpractice resulting in suicide experienced a 9.3% increase in suicides. On the other hand, and more intuitively, holding non-psychiatrist doctors liable de-creases suicide by 10.7%. These countervailing effects can be explained ...


Securing The Internet Of Healthcare, Michael Mattioli, Scott J. Shackelford, Steve Myers, Austin Brady, Yvette Wang, Stephanie Wong Jan 2018

Securing The Internet Of Healthcare, Michael Mattioli, Scott J. Shackelford, Steve Myers, Austin Brady, Yvette Wang, Stephanie Wong

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Cybersecurity, including the security of information technology (IT), is a critical requirement in ensuring society trusts, and therefore can benefit from, modern technology. Problematically, though, rarely a day goes by without a news story related to how critical data has been exposed, exfiltrated, or otherwise inappropriately used or accessed as a result of supply chain vulnerabilities. From the Russian government's campaign to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election to the September 2017 Equifax breach of more than 140-million Americans' credit reports, mitigating cyber risk has become a topic of conversation in boardrooms and the White House, on Wall ...


Criminalizing Pregnancy, Cortney Lollar Jul 2017

Criminalizing Pregnancy, Cortney Lollar

Indiana Law Journal

The state of Tennessee arrested a woman two days after she gave birth and charged her with assault of her newborn child based on her use of narcotics during her preg-nancy. Tennessee’s 2014 assault statute was the first to explicitly criminalize the use of drugs by a pregnant woman. But this law, along with others like it being considered by legislatures across the country, is only the most recent manifestation of a long history of using criminal law to punish poor mothers and mothers of color for their behavior while pregnant. The purported motivation for such laws is the ...


How States Can Respond To The Ahca: Using The Mccarran-Ferguson Act, David Gamage, Darien Shanske Jan 2017

How States Can Respond To The Ahca: Using The Mccarran-Ferguson Act, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Using Taxes To Support Multiple Health Insurance Risk Pools, David Gamage, Darien Shanske Jan 2017

Using Taxes To Support Multiple Health Insurance Risk Pools, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In most markets, it is considered desirable for consumers to have more choices. But health insurance regulation is different. When it comes to health insurance, giving consumers more choices can result in the market collapsing — leaving the sickest and most needy consumers without any good choices at all. To mitigate this problem, the Affordable Care Act’s Exchanges were designed around maintaining a single exchange-based risk pool. However, one problem with this approach taken by the Affordable Care Act is that the regulations designed to maintain the single exchange-based risk pool have the side effect of limiting some potentially positive ...


The American Health Care Act Would Toss The States A Hot Potato, David Gamage, Darien Shanske Jan 2017

The American Health Care Act Would Toss The States A Hot Potato, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This essay explains how the American Health Care Act (AHCA) – the House Republicans’ proposed replacement for Obamacare – would toss a hot potato to state governments. Were the AHCA to be enacted into law, state governments would need to act promptly if they are to save individual insurance markets within their states. This essay explains measures that state governments might take to respond to this threat.


Will The Ebola Epidemic Serve To Make Reform Of The Broken Health Research And Development Framework Go Viral?, Jeremy Mcdonald Jul 2016

Will The Ebola Epidemic Serve To Make Reform Of The Broken Health Research And Development Framework Go Viral?, Jeremy Mcdonald

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa has captured the public imagination as few other epidemics have, as its rapid spread and lethal effect demonstrated the devastating toll that infectious diseases can exact from a world unprepared to confront them. In light of the epidemic's tragic consequences, numerous experts have called for reform of the system of global health governance whose shortfalls allowed the epidemic to assume the horrifying dimensions it did. Among the many inadequacies that the outbreak uncovered is the insufficient amount of research into and development of treatments and vaccines for infectious diseases of poverty, among ...


Increasing Health Care Access In Yemen Through Community-Based Health Insurance, Matthew Fuss Jul 2016

Increasing Health Care Access In Yemen Through Community-Based Health Insurance, Matthew Fuss

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

This Note addresses the implementation of health insurance reform in Yemen. As a result of a system of user fees and a lack of health insurance, the current regime poses serious barriers to health care access for Yemen's uninsured citizens. When the dust settles from the ongoing conflict with Houthi rebels, the time will be ripe for replacing Yemen's health financing system. In order to rebuild trust and curb abuse in the public health system, legal reforms are required to implement health insurance through decentralized decision-making and accountability measures. The Welfare Regime Framework accommodates these general reforms through ...


Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski Jul 2016

Toward An International Constitution Of Patient Rights, Alison Poklaski

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In the past decade, medical tourism-the travel of patients across borders to receive medical treatment-has undergone unprecedented growth, fueled by the globalization of health care and related industries. While medical tourism can benefit patients through increased access to treatment and cost-savings, medical travel also raises concerns about ensuring quality of care and legal redress in medical malpractice. Moreover, existing regulations fail to address these unprecedented issues. The multilateral adoption of an International Constitution of Patient Rights (ICPR) is necessary in order to more effectively preserve medical tourism's benefits and guard against its risks.


The Right To Attention, Jasper L. Tran Apr 2016

The Right To Attention, Jasper L. Tran

Indiana Law Journal

What marketing, contracts, and healthcare—specifically informed consent and mandatory ultrasounds—have in common is the right to attention from the information receiver. However, scholarship most often focuses on the communicator’s perspective (e.g., how much information the communicator discloses) or on the information itself, but surprisingly, not much on the receiver’s perspective.

This dearth of scholarship from the information receiver’s perspective is problematic, because the information receiver is often the “little guy” in the conversation. We own and are entitled to our attention because attention is a property right and part of our individual dignity. Yet ...


Abortion, Informed Consent, And Regulatory Spillover, Katherine A. Shaw, Alex Stein Jan 2016

Abortion, Informed Consent, And Regulatory Spillover, Katherine A. Shaw, Alex Stein

Indiana Law Journal

The constitutional law of abortion stands on the untenable assumption that any state’s abortion regulations impact citizens of that state alone. On this understand-ing, the state’s boundaries demarcate the terrain on which women’s right to abortion clashes with state power to regulate that right.

This Article uncovers a previously unnoticed horizontal dimension of abortion regulation: the medical-malpractice penalties imposed upon doctors for failing to inform patients about abortion risks; the states’ power to define those risks, along with doctors’ informed-consent obligations and penalties; and, critically, the possi-bility that such standards might cross state lines. Planned Parenthood v ...


The Double-Edged Sword Of Health Care Integration: Consolidation And Cost Control, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Jaime S. King Jan 2016

The Double-Edged Sword Of Health Care Integration: Consolidation And Cost Control, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Jaime S. King

Indiana Law Journal

The average family of four in the United States spends $25,826 per year on health care. American health care costs so much because we both overuse and overpay for health care goods and services. The Affordable Care Act’s cost control policies focus on curbing overutilization by encouraging health care providers to integrate to pro-mote efficiency and eliminate waste, but the cost control policies largely ignore prices. This article examines this overlooked half of health care cost control policy: rising prices and the policy levers held by the states to address them. We challenge the conventional wisdom that reducing ...


North Carolina State Board Of Dental Examiners V. Ftc: Aligning Antitrust Law With Commerce Clause Jurisprudence Through A Natural Shift Of State-Federal Balance Of Power, Marie Forney Jan 2016

North Carolina State Board Of Dental Examiners V. Ftc: Aligning Antitrust Law With Commerce Clause Jurisprudence Through A Natural Shift Of State-Federal Balance Of Power, Marie Forney

Indiana Law Journal

The Supreme Court’s holding in North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC (NC Dental)1 in February 2015 demonstrates a natural shift in the balance of power from the states to the national government. As the country’s interstate and international economy has become more integrated, federal authority has likewise expanded.2 And although the federalism dichotomy has undergone periodic back-and-forth “swings” since the nation’s founding, the end result has been a net increase in federal power. NC Dental exemplifies this trend toward increasing national au-thority through the organic development of interstate commerce.


It Saves To Be Healthy: Using The Tax Code To Incentivize Employer-Provided Wellness Benefits, Hilary R. Shepherd Jan 2016

It Saves To Be Healthy: Using The Tax Code To Incentivize Employer-Provided Wellness Benefits, Hilary R. Shepherd

Indiana Law Journal

With lifestyle-related disease on the rise and an increasing number of employers being held responsible for providing health insurance to their employees, we as a society have incentives to promote wellness, even if only to cut health care costs. Part I of this Note outlines a brief history of employer-provided wellness benefits and provides a concise summary of the employer-provided wellness benefits available. Part II analyzes the relevant federal income tax law, specifically, the fringe benefits provision of the Internal Revenue Code, and concludes that under existing tax law, on-premises gym facilities do not yield any taxable income to employees ...


Buyers In The Baby Market: Toward A Transparent Consumerism, Jody L. Madeira, June Carbone Jan 2016

Buyers In The Baby Market: Toward A Transparent Consumerism, Jody L. Madeira, June Carbone

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This Article assesses the forces on the horizon remaking the fertility industry, including greater consolidation in the health care industry, the prospects for expanding (or contracting) insurance coverage, the likely sources of funding for future innovation in the industry, and the impact of globalization and fertility tourism. It concludes that concentration in the American market, in contrast with other medical services, may not necessarily raise prices, and price differentiation may proceed more from fertility tourism than from competition within a single geographic region. The largest challenge may be linking those who would fund innovation, whether innovation that produces new high ...


Mandatory Process, Matthew J.B. Lawrence Oct 2015

Mandatory Process, Matthew J.B. Lawrence

Indiana Law Journal

This Article suggests that people tend to undervalue their procedural rights—their proverbial “day in court”—until they are actually involved in a dispute. The Article argues that the inherent, outcome-independent value of participating in a dispute resolution process comes largely from its power to soothe a person’s grievance— their perception of unfairness and accompanying negative emotional reaction—win or lose. But a tendency to assume unchanging emotional states, known in behavioral economics as projection bias, can prevent people from anticipating that they might become aggrieved and from appreciating the grievance-soothing power of process. When this happens, people will ...


Assets, Costs, And Affordability: Why Magi-Based Medicaid Benefits Don't Account For True Need, Sara K. Hunkler May 2015

Assets, Costs, And Affordability: Why Magi-Based Medicaid Benefits Don't Account For True Need, Sara K. Hunkler

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

In 2014, Mary, an asset-wealthy individual, will qualify for Medicaid ahead of Bob, a needier individual with less net wealth and significantly higher medical costs, solely because Bob’s income is slightly higher. The current income-based eligibility standards for Medicaid mandated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) do not adequately reflect an individual’s need for federal assistance because they neglect to consider an individual’s assets, debts, and the circumstantial cost of their healthcare. Thus, these new federal standards permit significant disparities in the treatment of similarly situated impoverished individuals and allow prioritization of asset-wealthy individuals ...


Fracking And The Rural Poor: Negative Externalities, Failing Remedies, And Federal Legislation, Matthew Castelli May 2015

Fracking And The Rural Poor: Negative Externalities, Failing Remedies, And Federal Legislation, Matthew Castelli

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

This Note examines the relationship between the rural poor and the negative externalities of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”). It asserts that the rural poor are disproportionately burdened with fracking’s negative externalities and that comprehensive, national regulation is needed because current legal methods are insufficient to internalize these costs. The argument is made in four parts: describing fracking’s externalities; assessing their impact on the rural poor; analyzing current legal regimes; and proposing an equitable regulatory framework based on cooperative federalism.

Fracking produces three main categories of negative externalities: water, air, and land contamination. Water contamination can be caused by migration ...


The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act: The Latest Obstacle In The Path To Receiving Complementary And Alternative Health Care?, Chelsea Stanley Apr 2015

The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act: The Latest Obstacle In The Path To Receiving Complementary And Alternative Health Care?, Chelsea Stanley

Indiana Law Journal

Part I of this Note outlines a variety of medical techniques that are considered to be complementary and alternative practices, and it presents evidence of CAM’s growing influence in the United States. Part I also provides a concise summary of some of the most important features of the ACA. Part II analyzes the potential impact of the ACA on CAM. Part II focuses first on those provisions of the ACA that are believed to be supportive of CAM; however, Part II then proposes potential counterarguments ignored or overlooked by those who believe that the ACA will favorably impact CAM ...


The Increasing Weight Of Regulation: Countries Combat The Global Obesity Epidemic, Allyn L. Taylor, Emily Whelan Parento, Laura A. Schmidt Jan 2015

The Increasing Weight Of Regulation: Countries Combat The Global Obesity Epidemic, Allyn L. Taylor, Emily Whelan Parento, Laura A. Schmidt

Indiana Law Journal

Obesity is a global epidemic, exacting an enormous human and economic toll. In the absence of a comprehensive global governance strategy, states have increasingly employed a wide array of legal strategies targeting the drivers of obesity. This Article identifies recent global trends in obesity-related legislation and makes the normative case for an updated global governance strategy.

National governments have responded to the epidemic both by strengthening traditional interventions and by developing novel legislative strategies. This response consists of nine important trends: (1) strengthened and tailored tax measures; (2) broadened use of counter-advertising and health campaigns; (3) expanded food labeling; (4 ...


Epic Failure Of Ebola And Global Health Security, David P. Fidler Jan 2015

Epic Failure Of Ebola And Global Health Security, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Foreword--King V. Burwell Symposium: Comments On The Commentaries (And On Some Elephants In The Room), David Gamage Jan 2015

Foreword--King V. Burwell Symposium: Comments On The Commentaries (And On Some Elephants In The Room), David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This invited essay reviews the pieces submitted for the Pepperdine Law Review symposium on the King v. Burwell case. The thrust of this essay's response commentary is to praise the submitted essays for their excellence and insightfulness, but to suggest that the submitted essays nonetheless might benefit from focusing more on the role of the political mobilization that resulted in the King v. Burwell dispute. Ultimately, this essay suggests that what may have motivated the Supreme Court to develop and apply its new "deep economic and political significance" test in this this case may not have been anything inherent ...


Prompt On The King V. Burwell Case, David Gamage Jan 2015

Prompt On The King V. Burwell Case, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Once again, the U.S. Supreme Court will be deciding the fate of Obamacare — in the case of King v. Burwell. Also, once again, the future of American healthcare reform will turn on how the Supreme Court reviews a provision of Obamacare that was enacted through the tax code.

So far, the debates over King v. Burwell have largely focused on Constitutional law, Administrative law, and other non-tax-law considerations. Might there be unique tax law perspectives that could be brought in to better illuminate these debates? Does it matter that the provision being reviewed (I.R.C. Sec. 36B) was ...


State Court Protection Of Reproductive Rights: The Past, The Perils, And The Promise, Dawn E. Johnsen Jan 2015

State Court Protection Of Reproductive Rights: The Past, The Perils, And The Promise, Dawn E. Johnsen

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Abortion And The “Woman Question”: Forty Years Of Debate, Reva B. Siegel Oct 2014

Abortion And The “Woman Question”: Forty Years Of Debate, Reva B. Siegel

Indiana Law Journal

This paper was presented as the Addison C. Harris Lecture at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Bloomington, Indiana, September 27, 2012.


The Medical Device Excise Tax: An Unfair Burden, Elizabeth M. Bolka Oct 2014

The Medical Device Excise Tax: An Unfair Burden, Elizabeth M. Bolka

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Generic Entry Jujitsu: Innovation And Quality In Drug Manufacturing, W. Nicholson Price Ii Jul 2014

Generic Entry Jujitsu: Innovation And Quality In Drug Manufacturing, W. Nicholson Price Ii

IP Theory

The manufacturing side of the pharmaceutical industry has been neglected in innovation theory and policy, with the unfortunate result of stagnant manufacturing techniques driving major problems for the healthcare system. This innovation failure has roots in ineffective intellectual property incentives and high regulatory hurdles to innovative change. Changes in pure regulation or intellectual property incentives have significant potential to help the innovation deficit, but are not the only possibility for change. A relatively minor regulatory change could harness the powerful dynamics of pioneer/generic competition surrounding generic drug market entry. If pioneer firms were permitted to make label claims committing ...


Further Standing Lessons, Heather Elliott Jan 2014

Further Standing Lessons, Heather Elliott

Indiana Law Journal

Professor Elliott wrote a piece for the Indiana Law Journal in 2012 (available here). In this article, she updates her analysis and explores the implications of both the health-care and marriage equality cases on the Court’s standing doctrine.