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Articles 1 - 30 of 433

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Sep 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Facts Of Stigma: What's Missing From The Procedural Due Process Of Mental Health Commitment, Alexandra S. Bornstein Feb 2019

The Facts Of Stigma: What's Missing From The Procedural Due Process Of Mental Health Commitment, Alexandra S. Bornstein

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

This is the first systematic review of federal, judicial opinions that engage the stigma of mental health commitment in the context of procedural due process. In 1979, in Addington v. Texas, the Supreme Court held that the stigma, or adverse social consequences, of civil commitment is relevant to the procedural due process analysis. The following year, in Vitek v. Jones, the Court held that the stigmatizing consequences of a transfer from a prison to a mental health facility, coupled with mandatory treatment, triggered procedural protections.


Righting Research Wrongs: An Empirical Study Of How U.S. Institutions Resolve Grievances Involving Human Subjects, Kristen Underhill Feb 2019

Righting Research Wrongs: An Empirical Study Of How U.S. Institutions Resolve Grievances Involving Human Subjects, Kristen Underhill

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Tens of millions of people enroll in research studies in the United States every year, making human subjects research a multi-billion-dollar industry in the U.S. alone. Research carries risks: although many harms are inevitable, some also arise from errors or mistreatment by researchers, and the history of research ethics is in many ways a history of scandal. Despite regulatory efforts to remedy these abuses, injured subjects nonetheless have little recourse to U.S. courts. In the absence of tort remedies for research-related injuries, the only venue for resolving such disputes is through alternative dispute resolution (ADR)—or more commonly ...


The Problem Of Intra-Personal Cost, Brian Galle Feb 2019

The Problem Of Intra-Personal Cost, Brian Galle

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

"Externalities," or harms to others, provide a standard justification for government intervention in the private market. There is less agreement over whether government is justified in correcting "internalities," or harms we inflict on our own health or well-being. While some of the internality dispute is philosophical, some is practical. Critics suggest government lacks information to regulate internalities, and that any intervention would inefficiently distort a private market for self-help. This Article argues that these critiques of regulation overlook well-established tools of externality regulation, as well as a burgeoning literature on the measurement of internalities.


The Ever-Changing Landscape Of Informed Consent And Whether The Obligation To Explain A Procedure To The Patient May Be Delegated, Samuel D. Hodge, Maria Zambrano Steinhaus Feb 2019

The Ever-Changing Landscape Of Informed Consent And Whether The Obligation To Explain A Procedure To The Patient May Be Delegated, Samuel D. Hodge, Maria Zambrano Steinhaus

Arkansas Law Review

Informed consent is an integral part of the shared decision making process and requires a patient be informed of the benefits, risks and alternatives to a medical procedure. This information, which requirement has been codified into the law and practice of every healthcare provider, helps a patient decide whether to proceed with the recommended treatment plan. Informed consent has its foundation in the ethical notion of patient autonomy and fundamental human rights. After all, it is the patient’s decision to determine what may be done to his or her body and to ascertain the risks and benefits before undertaking ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Feb 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Pobreza Multidimensional En El Pacífico Colombiano 2010 - 2016, Lizeth Dayana Manzano Murillo, Laura Antonia Maturana Cifuentes Jan 2019

Pobreza Multidimensional En El Pacífico Colombiano 2010 - 2016, Lizeth Dayana Manzano Murillo, Laura Antonia Maturana Cifuentes

Economía

La pobreza es un fenómeno presente en muchos países de mundo, y un problema prioritario en las políticas de desarrollo económico y social, por lo que se hace pertinente estudiarla de manera rigurosa, analizando sus determinantes, y sus vínculos con los diferentes factores socioeconómicos de la población. Como bien se sabe, el Pacífico Colombiano es la región más pobre del país; cuenta con el menor ingreso per cápita, y elevadas tasas de pobreza monetaria y multidimensional. El objetivo de esta monografía de grado es analizar la pobreza en el Pacífico Colombiano, considerando la aproximación multidimensional, implementando de manera detallada la ...


Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii Dec 2018

Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Cannabis has a long history in the United States. Originally, doctors and pharmacists used cannabis for a variety of purposes. After the Mexican Revolution led to widespread migration from Mexico to the United States, many Americans responded by associating this influx of foreigners with the use of cannabis, and thereby racializing and stigmatizing the drug. After the collapse of prohibition, the federal government repurposed its enormous enforcement bureaucracy to address the perceived problem of cannabis, despite the opposition of the American Medical Association to this new prohibition. Ultimately, both the states and the federal government classified cannabis as a dangerous ...


... Because "Yes" Actually Means "No": A Personalized Prescriptive To Reactualize Informed Consent In Dispute Resolution Sep 2018

... Because "Yes" Actually Means "No": A Personalized Prescriptive To Reactualize Informed Consent In Dispute Resolution

Marquette Law Review

None.


Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown Aug 2018

Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


 The Roots And Branches Of The Medical-Legal Partnership Approach To Health: From Collegiality To Civil Rights To Health Equity, Joel Teitelbaum, Ellen Lawton Jun 2018

 The Roots And Branches Of The Medical-Legal Partnership Approach To Health: From Collegiality To Civil Rights To Health Equity, Joel Teitelbaum, Ellen Lawton

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

This Article traces the roots of the medical-legal partnership (MLP) approach

to health as a way of promoting the use of law to remedy societal and institutional pathologies that lead to individual and population illness and to health inequalities. Given current forces at work - the medical care and public health systems' foctis on social determinants of health, the increased use of value-based medical care payment reforms, and the emerging movement to train the next generation of health care and public health professionals in structural competency - the time is ripe to spread the view that law is an important lens through ...


 Ethics Of Evidence: Health Care Professionals In Public Benefits And Immigration Proceedings, Jesselyn Friley Jun 2018

 Ethics Of Evidence: Health Care Professionals In Public Benefits And Immigration Proceedings, Jesselyn Friley

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

This Article discusses the role of health care professionals in applications for public benefits and immigration relief. Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) often represent patients who are applying for disability or veterans benefits, or who are seeking asylum based on past persecution. The strength of a patient's medical evidence often determines whether their claim succeeds or fails. Many health care professionals provide corroborating evidence for their patients, but even when they do not, their opinions appear in the proceedings through medical records.


 Medical-Legal Partnerships With Communities: Legal Empowerment To Transform Care, Tamar Ezer Jun 2018

 Medical-Legal Partnerships With Communities: Legal Empowerment To Transform Care, Tamar Ezer

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) integrate legal services into health care settings to provide holistic care and address the social determinants of health. This article brings a legal-empowerment lens to MLP work, arguing for a stronger focus on communities. It examines the application to MLPs of bringing services to communities, investing in rights literacy, and partnering with community-based paralegals. It then outlines the potential for a transformation in health and legal services to a rights - rather than needs-based framework where communities are active partners in program design and development.


 A Mental Health Checkup For Children At The Doctor's Office: Lessons From The Medical-Legal Partnership Movement To Fulfill Medicaid's Promise, Yael Cannon Jun 2018

 A Mental Health Checkup For Children At The Doctor's Office: Lessons From The Medical-Legal Partnership Movement To Fulfill Medicaid's Promise, Yael Cannon

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Traumatic childhood events and the stress they cause can negatively affect health over a lifetime. For children with Medicaid coverage, visits to the doctor's office present an opportunity to improve this trajectory. Medicaid's Early Periodic Screening Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) mandate requires that children receive more than a basic physical when they see a doctor for regular "well-child checks."


Introduction To The Medical-Legal Partnership Symposium Issue, Susanna D. Evarts, Nathan Guevremont Jun 2018

Introduction To The Medical-Legal Partnership Symposium Issue, Susanna D. Evarts, Nathan Guevremont

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Since the first medical-legal partnership (MLP) opened in 1993 at the Boston Medical Center, MLPs have increasingly become integrated into community health centers around the United States. And MLPs are in the business of growth: more than 300 MLPs are currently operating in the United States, and 59 percent of those are fewer than five years old. MLPs are collaborations between physicians and civil attorneys in which the attorneys are integrated into the health care team, and work with the patient to address civil legal needs that impact the social determinants of a patient's health.


Pegalis & Erickson Health Law Colloquium, New York Law School Apr 2018

Pegalis & Erickson Health Law Colloquium, New York Law School

Health Law Society Publications

Examining the Intersection of Law and Bioethics in 2013.

The American legal system has played a dramatic role in shaping the field of bioethics. The dynamic intersection of law and bioethics is a fruitful area of inquiry for purposes of knowledge generation, policy making and best practices. Reflecting a diversity of perspectives, this CLE will examine the crucial connection between law and matters bioethical in 2018. The program will include a focus on clinical decision making, palliative and end-of-life care, dispute resolution, medical and social science research, and informed consent and decision making.


Navigating The Research-Clinical Interface In Genomic Medicine: Analysis From The Cser Consortium, Ellen Wright Clayton, Susan M. Wolf, Laura M. Amendola, Et Al. Jan 2018

Navigating The Research-Clinical Interface In Genomic Medicine: Analysis From The Cser Consortium, Ellen Wright Clayton, Susan M. Wolf, Laura M. Amendola, Et Al.

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Purpose: The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Consortium encompasses nine National Institutes of Health– funded U-award projects investigating translation of genomic sequencing into clinical care. Previous literature has distinguished norms and rules governing research versus clinical care. This is the first study to explore how genomics investigators describe and navigate the research–clinical interface. Methods: A CSER working group developed a 22-item survey. All nine U-award projects participated. Descriptive data were tabulated and qualitative analysis of text responses identified themes and characterizations of the research–clinical interface. Results: Survey responses described how studies approached the research–clinical interface, including in ...


Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger Jan 2018

Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Suffrage For People With Intellectual Disabilities And Mental Illness: Observations On A Civic Controversy, Charles Kopel Dec 2017

Suffrage For People With Intellectual Disabilities And Mental Illness: Observations On A Civic Controversy, Charles Kopel

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Most electoral democracies, including forty-three states in the United States,
deny people the right to vote on the basis of intellectual disability or mental illness. Scholars in several fields have addressed these disenfranchisements, including legal scholars who analyze their validity under U.S. constitutional law and international-human-rights law, philosophers and political scientists who analyze their validity under democratic theory, and mental-health
researchers who analyze their relationship to scientific categories.


Regulatory Disruption And Arbitrage In Health-Care Data Protection, Nicolas P. Terry Dec 2017

Regulatory Disruption And Arbitrage In Health-Care Data Protection, Nicolas P. Terry

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

This article explains how the structure of U.S. health-care data protection
(specifically its sectoral and downstream properties) has led to a chronically uneven policy environment for different types of health-care data. It examines claims for health-care data protection exceptionalism and competing demands such as data liquidity. In conclusion, the article takes the position that health­ care-data exceptionalism remains a valid imperative and that even current concerns about data liquidity can be accommodated in an exceptional protective model. However, re-calibrating our protection of health-care data residing outside of the traditional health-care domain is challenging, currently even
politically impossible.


Paying Research Participants: Regulatory Uncertainty, Conceptual Confusion, And A Path Forward, Emily A. Largent, Holly Fernandez Lynch Dec 2017

Paying Research Participants: Regulatory Uncertainty, Conceptual Confusion, And A Path Forward, Emily A. Largent, Holly Fernandez Lynch

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

The practice of offering payment to individuals in exchange for their
participation in clinical research is widespread and longstanding. Nevertheless, such payment remains the source of substantial debate, in particular about whether or the extent to which offers of payment coerce and/or unduly induce individuals to participate. Yet, the various laws, regulations, and ethical guidelines that govern the conduct of human subjects research offer
relatively little in the way of specific guidance regarding what makes a payment offer ethically acceptable-or not. Moreover, there is a lack of definitional agreement regarding what the terms coercion and undue inducement mean in ...


Revisiting Incentive-Based Contracts, Wendy Netter Epstein Dec 2017

Revisiting Incentive-Based Contracts, Wendy Netter Epstein

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Incentive-based pay is rational, intuitive, and popular. Agency theory tells us
that a principal seeking to align its incentives with an agent's should be able to simply pay the agent to achieve the principal's desired results. Indeed, this strategy has long been used across diverse industries-from executive compensation to education, professional sports to public service-but with mixed results. Now a new convert to incentive compensation has appeared on the
scene: the United States' behemoth health-care industry. In many ways, the incentive mismatch story is the same. Insurance companies and employers are concerned about constraining the cost of care ...


Aligning Opioid Prescribing Pathways, Andrea Lai, Outpatient Pharmacy, Haley Pelletier, Suneela Nayak, Stephen Tyzik, Ruth Hanselman Aug 2017

Aligning Opioid Prescribing Pathways, Andrea Lai, Outpatient Pharmacy, Haley Pelletier, Suneela Nayak, Stephen Tyzik, Ruth Hanselman

Maine Medical Center

There is a drug epidemic sweeping the State of Maine and it continues to worsen each passing year. In 2017, the Maine legislature passed Public Law Chapter 488 to strengthen the controlled substance prescription monitoring program. An outpatient pharmacy, located in a large acute care hospital, created a performance improvement project to clarify opioid prescription and resolve any non-compliance with Chapter 488.

After a root cause analysis, several KPIs were established to include tracking the number of phone calls made by pharmacists to non-compliant providers to clarify scripts, provide one on one education and ultimately resolve non-compliance. Repeat offenders were ...


A Cross-Sectional Exploration Of Household Financial Reactions And Homebuyer Awareness Of Registered Sex Offenders In A Rural, Suburban, And Urban County., John Charles Navarro Aug 2017

A Cross-Sectional Exploration Of Household Financial Reactions And Homebuyer Awareness Of Registered Sex Offenders In A Rural, Suburban, And Urban County., John Charles Navarro

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

As stigmatized persons, registered sex offenders betoken instability in communities. Depressed home sale values are associated with the presence of registered sex offenders even though the public is largely unaware of the presence of registered sex offenders. Using a spatial multilevel approach, the current study examines the role registered sex offenders influence sale values of homes sold in 2015 for three U.S. counties (rural, suburban, and urban) located in Illinois and Kentucky within the social disorganization framework. Homebuyers were surveyed to examine whether awareness of local registered sex offenders and the homebuyer’s community type operate as moderators between ...


A Breakthrough With The Tpp: The Tobacco Carve-Out, Sergio Puig, Gregory Shaffer Mar 2017

A Breakthrough With The Tpp: The Tobacco Carve-Out, Sergio Puig, Gregory Shaffer

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

The United States has made great progress in reducing tobacco consumption at home while spending taxpayer money to promote its consumption abroad. 1 While U.S. tobacco consumption rates have fallen dramatically since the 1960s, they are soaring in the developing world. 2 Today, about twenty percent of adults in the world smoke, and more than eighty percent of them live in low- and middle-income countries. 3 As a result, tobacco could kill one billion people this century, and largely in these lower-income countries.


An Evidence-Based Objection To Retributive Justice, Brian T.M. Mammarella Mar 2017

An Evidence-Based Objection To Retributive Justice, Brian T.M. Mammarella

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Advancements in neuroscience and related fields are beginning to show,
with increasing clarity, that certain human behaviors stem from uncontrolled, mechanistic causes. These discoveries beg the question: If a given behavior results from some combination of biological predispositions, neurological circumstances, and environmental influences, is that action unwilled
and therefore absolved of all attributions of credit, blame, and responsibility? A number of scholars in law and neuroscience who answer "yes" have considered how the absence of free will should impact criminal law's willingness to justify punishments on the basis of retribution, with some arguing that criminal law ought to dispense ...


Rehabilitation, Education, And The Integration Of Individuals With Severe Brain Injury Into Civil Society: Towards An Expanded Rights Agenda In Response To New Insights From Translational Neuroethics And Neuroscience, Megan S. Wright, Joseph J. Fins Mar 2017

Rehabilitation, Education, And The Integration Of Individuals With Severe Brain Injury Into Civil Society: Towards An Expanded Rights Agenda In Response To New Insights From Translational Neuroethics And Neuroscience, Megan S. Wright, Joseph J. Fins

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

Many minimally conscious patients are segregated in nursing homes, and are without access to rehabilitative technologies that could help them reintegrate into their communities. In this Article, we argue that persons in a minimally conscious state or who have the potential to progress to such a state must be provided rehabilitative services instead of being isolated in custodial care. The right to rehabilitative technologies for the injured brain stems by analogy to the expectation of free public education for children and adolescents, and also by statute under the Americans with Disabilities Act and under Supreme Court jurisprudence, namely the leading ...


Reimagining The Risk Of Long-Term Care, Allison K. Hoffman Mar 2017

Reimagining The Risk Of Long-Term Care, Allison K. Hoffman

Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics

U.S. law and policy on long-term care fail to address the insecurity American families face due to prolonged illness and disability-a problem that grows more serious as the population ages and rates of disability rise. This Article argues that, even worse, we have focused on only part of the problem. It illuminates two ways that prolonged disability or illness can create insecurity.
The first arises from the risk of becoming disabled or sick and needing long-term care, which could be called "care-recipient" risk. The second arises out of the risk of becoming responsible for someone else's care, which ...


The Death Of Private Practice: How The Rising Cost Of Healthcare Is Destroying Physician Autonomy, Oliver Owaid Jan 2017

The Death Of Private Practice: How The Rising Cost Of Healthcare Is Destroying Physician Autonomy, Oliver Owaid

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

Over the past two decades, the number of physicians in private practice has dropped dramatically. This trend is the result of the financial pressure imposed by the federal government in response to the skyrocketing cost of healthcare. Physicians, frustrated by stagnant reimbursement rates in conjunction with increased administrative costs and overhead, are choosing hospital staff employment in favor of private practice. This trend is to the detriment of the physician, the taxpayers, and, most importantly, the patients. Patients treated in hospital outpatient settings have worse outcomes than those treated in private practice. In addition, hospital procedures cost both the government ...


The Origins Of American Health Libertarianism, Lewis A. Grossman Nov 2016

The Origins Of American Health Libertarianism, Lewis A. Grossman

Lewis A. Grossman

This Article examines Americans' enduring demand for freedom of therapeutic choice as a popular constitutional movement originating in the United States' early years. In exploring extrajudicial advocacy for therapeutic choice between the American Revolution and the Civil War, this piece illustrates how multiple concepts of freedom in addition to bodily freedom bolstered the concept of a constitutional right to medical liberty.