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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

10th Annual Pegalis Law Group Health Law Colloquium, New York Law School Oct 2019

10th Annual Pegalis Law Group Health Law Colloquium, New York Law School

Health Law Society Publications

Federalism, ERISA, and State Single-Payer Health Care. How to Make Sense of Future Legislation and the Impact on Population Health

(CLE Presentation on Oct. 24th 2019)

Moderator:

Adam S. Herbst, Esq., Senior Vice President, Chief Legal and Strategic Planning Officer of Blythedale’s Children Hospital; Adjunct Professor at New York Law School teaching Health Law and Policy; Co-director of the NYLS Health Law and Patient Safety Project; Lecturer, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University

Panelists:

Honorable Richard N. Gottfried, New York State Assembly (District 75) & Chairman of the Assembly's Committee on Health and Sponsor of the New ...


Population Law And Policy: From Control And Contraception To Equity And Equality, Victoria Mather Oct 2019

Population Law And Policy: From Control And Contraception To Equity And Equality, Victoria Mather

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Sep 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Humanizing Work Requirements For Safety Net Programs, Mary Leto Pareja Sep 2019

Humanizing Work Requirements For Safety Net Programs, Mary Leto Pareja

Pace Law Review

This Article explores the political and policy appeal of work requirements for public benefit programs and concludes that inclusion of such requirements can be a reasonable design choice, but not in their current form. This Article’s proposals attempt to humanize these highly controversial work requirements while acknowledging the equity concerns they are designed to address. Drawing on expansive definitions of “work” found in guidance published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (“CMS”) and in various state waiver applications, this Article proposes that work requirements be approved for Medicaid (as well as other benefit programs) only if they encompass ...


Humanizing Work Requirements For Safety Net Programs, Mary Leto Pareja Sep 2019

Humanizing Work Requirements For Safety Net Programs, Mary Leto Pareja

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the political and policy appeal of work requirements for public benefit programs and concludes that inclusion of such requirements can be a reasonable design choice, but not in their current form. This Article’s proposals attempt to humanize these highly controversial work requirements while acknowledging the equity concerns they are designed to address. Drawing on expansive definitions of “work” found in guidance published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (“CMS”) and in various state waiver applications, this Article proposes that work requirements be approved for Medicaid (as well as other benefit programs) only if they encompass ...


The “Conscience” Rule: How Will It Affect Patients’ Access To Health Services?, Lawrence O. Gostin Jun 2019

The “Conscience” Rule: How Will It Affect Patients’ Access To Health Services?, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

On May 2, 2019, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released a final rule that heightens the rights of hospitals and health workers to refuse to participate in patients’ medical care based on religious or moral grounds. The rule covers OCR’s authority to investigate and enforce violations of 25 federal “conscience protection” laws. Tied to the US Constitution’s spending power, the rule applies to state and local governments, as well as public and private health care professionals and entities if they receive federal funds such as Medicare or Medicaid ...


Good Of My Patient: Who Gets To Decide?, Lauren Ruvo May 2019

Good Of My Patient: Who Gets To Decide?, Lauren Ruvo

Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender, & Social Justice

Physicians play a crucial role in helping patients make life or death decisions. However, all healthcare professionals have personal beliefs and biases that influence these decisions. This paper explores how physicians are able to uphold the Hippocratic ideal of doing what is in the best interest of the patient while taking into account their personal beliefs and biases. The paper begins by analyzing existing schools of thought around how to do what is best for the patient. While there are many different views, this paper looks at the main three: the bioethical movement, the paternalistic approach to medicine, and the ...


The Impact Of H.B. 214: A Critical Analysis Of The Texas "Rape Insurance" Bill, Lucie Arvallo Apr 2019

The Impact Of H.B. 214: A Critical Analysis Of The Texas "Rape Insurance" Bill, Lucie Arvallo

St. Mary's Law Journal

Texas House Bill 214 (H.B. 214) is subject to challenge under the Supreme Court precedent protecting a woman’s right to choose. Passed in 2017, H.B. 214 regulates Texas insurance markets by prohibiting coverage for an elective abortion unless a woman affirmatively opts into such coverage through a separate contract and pays a separate premium. Similar restrictions on insurance coverage for elective abortion in other states have been met with mixed results in the courts. What sets H.B. 214 apart from other regulations of insurance coverage for abortion is that it does not include any exceptions for ...


Guantánamo Bodies: Law, Media, And Biopower, Cary Federman, Dave Holmes Apr 2019

Guantánamo Bodies: Law, Media, And Biopower, Cary Federman, Dave Holmes

Cary Federman

The idea of the Guantánamo detainee as a Muselmann, the lowest order of concentration camp inmates, contains within it important implications for the new understanding of sovereignty in the era of Guantánamo, in an age of exception. The purpose of this article is to explain the status of those who are detained at Guantánamo Bay. Stated broadly, in assessing that status, we will emphasize the connection between the altered meaning of sovereignty that has accompanied the placing of prisoners in an American penal colony in Cuba and the biopolitical status of the prisoners who reside there. More particularly, we will ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Feb 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Unlocking Access To Health Care: A Federalist Approach To Reforming Occupational Licensing, Gabriel Scheffler Jan 2019

Unlocking Access To Health Care: A Federalist Approach To Reforming Occupational Licensing, Gabriel Scheffler

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Several features of the existing occupational licensing system impede access to health care without providing appreciable protections for patients. Licensing restrictions prevent health care providers from offering services to the full extent of their competency, obstruct the adoption of telehealth, and deter foreign-trained providers from practicing in the United States. Scholars and policymakers have proposed a number of reforms to this system over the years, but these proposals have had a limited impact for political and institutional reasons.

Still, there are grounds for optimism. In recent years, the federal government has taken a range of initial steps to reform licensing ...


An Analysis And Critique Of Mental Health Treatment In American State Prisons And Proposal For Improved Care, Shelby Hayne Jan 2019

An Analysis And Critique Of Mental Health Treatment In American State Prisons And Proposal For Improved Care, Shelby Hayne

Scripps Senior Theses

Mental health treatment in state prisons is revealed to be highly variable, under-funded, and systematically inadequate. Existing literature exposes this injustice but fails to provide a comprehensive proposal for reform. This paper attempts to fill that gap, outlining a cost-effective, evidence-based treatment proposal, directly addressing the deficits in care revealed through analysis of our current system. In addition, this paper provides historical overviews of the prison system and mental health treatment, utilizing theoretical perspectives to contextualize this proposal in the present state of affairs. Lastly, the evidence is provided to emphasize the potential economic and social benefits of improving mental ...


Billion Dollar Orphans: Tension Between The Legal Intent And Social Purpose Of The Orphan Drug Act, John Sheridan Jan 2019

Billion Dollar Orphans: Tension Between The Legal Intent And Social Purpose Of The Orphan Drug Act, John Sheridan

Texas A&M Law Review

This Comment examines the extent to which Congress empowered the FDA to address the increase in petitions and the general accessibility of orphan drug remedies. Specifically, this Comment seeks to understand why the FDA’s interpretation of the purpose of the ODA seems to conflict with the statutory intent as interpreted by federal courts. This Comment considers a statute’s ultimate goal or social purpose to be the purpose of the statute, whereas the express mechanisms by which Congress seeks to bring about these goals is best understood as the statute’s intent. To understand the FDA and judiciary’s ...


Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii Dec 2018

Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Cannabis has a long history in the United States. Originally, doctors and pharmacists used cannabis for a variety of purposes. After the Mexican Revolution led to widespread migration from Mexico to the United States, many Americans responded by associating this influx of foreigners with the use of cannabis, and thereby racializing and stigmatizing the drug. After the collapse of prohibition, the federal government repurposed its enormous enforcement bureaucracy to address the perceived problem of cannabis, despite the opposition of the American Medical Association to this new prohibition. Ultimately, both the states and the federal government classified cannabis as a dangerous ...


Nfib V. Sebelius At 5, Nicole Huberfeld Jun 2018

Nfib V. Sebelius At 5, Nicole Huberfeld

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Take This Job And Shove It: The Pragmatic Philosophy Of Johnny Paycheck And A Prayer For Strict Liability In Appalachia, Eugene "Trey" Moore Iii May 2018

Take This Job And Shove It: The Pragmatic Philosophy Of Johnny Paycheck And A Prayer For Strict Liability In Appalachia, Eugene "Trey" Moore Iii

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming


Accessing The Right To Choose: Factors Predicting The Enactment Of State-Level Abortion Clinic Access Laws, Hannah Gourdie May 2018

Accessing The Right To Choose: Factors Predicting The Enactment Of State-Level Abortion Clinic Access Laws, Hannah Gourdie

Undergraduate Honors Theses

During the 1980s and 1990s, anti-abortion violence and harassment targeted at reproductive health clinics spiked in response to religious and political mobilization around the national decriminalization of abortion. To combat violence, harassment, and mass protests at clinics, 16 states and DC enacted abortion clinic access laws. These laws typically prohibit certain activities, such as obstruction and vandalism, and some create no-protest buffer zones that restrict clinic protests. Most research on clinic access laws concentrates on how these laws affect levels of anti-abortion violence and disruption targeted at clinics. Other literature focuses on the tensions between pro-life speech and privacy/abortion ...


Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Pregnant: The Jurisprudence Of Abortion Exceptionalism In Garza V. Hargan, Kaytlin L. Roholt May 2018

Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Pregnant: The Jurisprudence Of Abortion Exceptionalism In Garza V. Hargan, Kaytlin L. Roholt

Texas A&M Law Review

Since a majority of Supreme Court justices created the abortion right in 1973, a troubling pattern has emerged: The Supreme Court has come to ignore—and even nullify—longstanding precedent and legal doctrines in the name of preserving and expanding the abortion right. And with a Supreme Court majority that is blithe to manipulate any doctrine or principle—no matter how deeply rooted in U.S. legal tradition—in the name of expansive abortion rights, it should come as no surprise that lower courts are following suit. Most recently, the D.C. Circuit fired up the “ad hoc nullification machine ...


Marijuana Agriculture Law: Regulation At The Root Of An Industry, Ryan Stoa Mar 2018

Marijuana Agriculture Law: Regulation At The Root Of An Industry, Ryan Stoa

Ryan B. Stoa

Marijuana legalization is sweeping the nation. Recreational marijuana use is legal in eight states. Medical marijuana use is legal in thirteen states. Only three states maintain an absolute criminal prohibition on marijuana use. Many of these legalization initiatives propose to regulate marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol, and many titles are variations of the "Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act." For political and public health reasons the analogy makes sense, but it also reveals a regulatory blind spot. States may be using alcohol as a model for regulating the distribution, retail, and consumption of marijuana, but marijuana is much more ...


Comparative Cannabis: Approaches To Marijuana Agriculture Regulation In The United States And Canada, Ryan Stoa Mar 2018

Comparative Cannabis: Approaches To Marijuana Agriculture Regulation In The United States And Canada, Ryan Stoa

Ryan B. Stoa

The United States and Canada may be friends and allies, but the two countries' approaches to the regulation of marijuana agriculture have not evolved in tandem. On the contrary, their respective paths toward legalization and regulation of marijuana agriculture are remarkably divergent. In the United States, where marijuana remains a federally prohibited and tightly-controlled substance, legalization and regulation have remained the province of state legislatures and their administrative agencies for decades. In Canada, a succession of court cases paving the way toward medicinal marijuana use has prompted the federal government to develop a national framework committed to "legalize, regulate, and ...


Consumers In Shock: How Federal Government Overregulation Led Mylan To Acquire A Monopoly Over Epinephrine Autoinjectors, Nicole O'Toole Mar 2018

Consumers In Shock: How Federal Government Overregulation Led Mylan To Acquire A Monopoly Over Epinephrine Autoinjectors, Nicole O'Toole

DePaul Business and Commercial Law Journal

The philosophy that federal government intervention increases costs and decreases options and values available to consumers can be analyzed across a plethora of markets. This Note will focus on the epinephrine autoinjector market, specifically looking at Mylan's epinephrine autoinjector known as the EpiPen. Today, the EpiPen is considered the “Kleenex” of epinephrine autoinjectors as it is estimated to control over ninety percent of the market share. From a Darwinist perspective it would appear that because the EpiPen controls most of the market, it must be the most superior product available to consumers. However, as this note will cover, this ...


Finding A Right To Abortion Coverage: The Ppaca, Intersectionality, And Positive Rights, Courtney Olson Feb 2018

Finding A Right To Abortion Coverage: The Ppaca, Intersectionality, And Positive Rights, Courtney Olson

Seattle University Law Review

During a floor debate in 1976, Representative Henry Hyde explained, “I would certainly like to prevent, if I could legally, anybody having an abortion, a rich woman, a middle class woman, or a poor woman. Unfortunately, the only vehicle available is the [Medicaid] bill.” For a short time after the Supreme Court of the United States established the right to abortion in Roe v. Wade, Medicaid did not distinguish between coverage for abortion and other medical services. That all changed when Congress passed the Hyde Amendment to the Medicaid Act in 1976. This Note will argue that a right to ...


How Commonsense Consumption Acts Are Preventing “Big Food” Litigation, Grace Thompson Feb 2018

How Commonsense Consumption Acts Are Preventing “Big Food” Litigation, Grace Thompson

Seattle University Law Review

This Note takes a critical look at Commonsense Consumption Acts and how they are detrimental to the possibility of “Big Food” litigation. The tobacco industry was held accountable through the effective use of tort litigation (commonly referred to as “Big Tobacco” litigation), and the food industry could theoretically be held similarly accountable, but CCAs are preventing the possibility of similar reform. Therefore, in order for health reform to be as effective as tobacco reform, CCAs must be repealed in the states where they exist. Part I of this Note discusses why the food industry needs tort reform. Specifically, it argues ...


The Affordable Care Act And The Chronic Challenge Of Cost Control, Isaac D. Buck Feb 2018

The Affordable Care Act And The Chronic Challenge Of Cost Control, Isaac D. Buck

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Tax Constitutional Questions In Obamacare Continued: Nfib V. Sebelius In Light Of Citizens United V. Fec, Speiser V. Randall, Windsor V. United States, Lawrence V. Texas, Et Al., John R. Dorocak Feb 2018

Tax Constitutional Questions In Obamacare Continued: Nfib V. Sebelius In Light Of Citizens United V. Fec, Speiser V. Randall, Windsor V. United States, Lawrence V. Texas, Et Al., John R. Dorocak

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Saving Construction At 5 Years, Josh Blackman Feb 2018

The Saving Construction At 5 Years, Josh Blackman

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Challenges Of Conscience In A World Of Compromise, Amy J. Sepinwall Jan 2018

The Challenges Of Conscience In A World Of Compromise, Amy J. Sepinwall

Legal Studies and Business Ethics Papers

The process of crafting and passing legislation might be thought to be the locus of compromise par excellence.1 Yet, where the law that results impinges upon moral or religious belief or practice, the issue of compromise arises anew, in both senses of the word: Individuals who oppose the law on moral or religious grounds believe that their political obedeience will compromise them in a fundamental way. Their plea for an exemption from the objectionable legal requirement is, then, a bid for further compromise.2 Compromise in the first sense concerns an undercutting of the self, while compromise in the ...


Decriminalization Of Prostitution: The Soros Effect, Jody Raphael Jan 2018

Decriminalization Of Prostitution: The Soros Effect, Jody Raphael

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

This article explores the activities of George Soros and his charitable organization, Open Society Foundations (OSF), in advocating for the full decriminalization of the sex trade industry. Research finds that OSF spends only a small amount of money on grass roots “sex worker” groups around the world advocating for full decriminalization, but the foundation awards larger amounts of funds to large human rights groups whose reports and policies have a wider reach. OSF’s rationale for full decriminalization fails to consider violence and coercion in the sex trade industry, misreads research, and does not include research from venues where full ...


Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger Jan 2018

Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Special International Zones In Practice And Theory, Tom W. Bell Dec 2017

Special International Zones In Practice And Theory, Tom W. Bell

Tom W. Bell

The French Republic had a problem. Foreign nationals had flown into the Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport near Paris and claimed the right to stay as refugees seeking asylum. Unwilling to have the supposed refugees imposed upon it, France resolved to process their claims without letting them into the country. How? By keeping them in the airport’s international transit zone—the area between the exit doors of airplanes arriving from abroad and the far side of customs and immigration clearance. This split border allowed France to summarily process and (typically) deport the foreigners while keeping them outside the country’s ...