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Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Key New Hampshire And Federal Statutes Regulating Health Care Delivery And Payment, Lucy Hodder Oct 2017

Key New Hampshire And Federal Statutes Regulating Health Care Delivery And Payment, Lucy Hodder

Law Faculty Scholarship

A summary of New Hampshire and federal regulations by subject matter, chart of New Hampshire state agency responsibilities, federal laws and regulation: An index


Covering The Care: Cost Sharing Reductions In Nh, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder Jun 2017

Covering The Care: Cost Sharing Reductions In Nh, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder

Law Faculty Scholarship

This brief uses national data to describe the NH population who received Cost Sharing Reductions for coverage on the NH Marketplace.


Covering The Care: A Focus On The Nh Marketplace, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder Jun 2017

Covering The Care: A Focus On The Nh Marketplace, Jo Porter, Lucy C. Hodder

Law Faculty Scholarship

The second brief uses national and state data to describe the NH population enrolled in the health insurance plans through the NH Marketplace.


Public Company Health Insurers And Medical Loss Ratios: An Event Study Of Dates Associated With The Affordable Care Act, Rachelle Quinn Mar 2017

Public Company Health Insurers And Medical Loss Ratios: An Event Study Of Dates Associated With The Affordable Care Act, Rachelle Quinn

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has proved to be a contentious regulatory and political topic. Although key features were established within the law the complexity of the new provisions and political opposition resulted in a series of federal and state governmental process changes, rule clarifications, and legal challenges. One component of the ACA is the introduction of a federal Medical Loss Ratio (MLR), which requires insurers to spend specified percentages of their premium revenue dollars on medical services and quality improvement actions. If thresholds are not met, insurers must refund premiums to their members, potentially removing millions of dollars from ...


Changing The Tax Code To Create Consumer-Driven Health Insurance Competition, Regina Herzlinger, Barak D. Richman Jan 2017

Changing The Tax Code To Create Consumer-Driven Health Insurance Competition, Regina Herzlinger, Barak D. Richman

Faculty Scholarship

Because current tax laws exclude employer-paid health insurance premiums from employees’ taxable wages and income, employer-sponsored insurance remains the primary source of health insurance for most employed Americans. Economists have long blamed the employer-based insurance tax exclusion for inflating health care costs, and, more recently, for constraining income growth and exacerbating income inequality.

We execute a simulation to test the effect of permitting employees to receive their employers’ premium contribution directly and then purchase health insurance themselves, using tax-free funds. Employees could deduct for income tax purposes the amount used for insurance and, if they spend less than the amount ...


N.C. Medicaid Reform: A Bipartisan Path Forward, Barak D. Richman, Allison Rice Jan 2017

N.C. Medicaid Reform: A Bipartisan Path Forward, Barak D. Richman, Allison Rice

Faculty Scholarship

The North Carolina Medicaid program currently constitutes 32% of the state budget and provides insurance coverage to 18% of the state’s population. At the same time, 13% of North Carolinians remain uninsured, and even among the insured, significant health disparities persist across income, geography, education, and race.

The Duke University Bass Connections Medicaid Reform project gathered to consider how North Carolina could use its limited Medicaid dollars more effectively to reduce the incidence of poor health, improve access to healthcare, and reduce budgetary pressures on the state’s taxpayers.

This report is submitted to North Carolina’s policymakers and ...


Quantifying Wraparound Health Insurance Needs Among Employed People With Disabilities, Jack Gettens, Denise Hoffmann, Alexis D. Henry Jun 2015

Quantifying Wraparound Health Insurance Needs Among Employed People With Disabilities, Jack Gettens, Denise Hoffmann, Alexis D. Henry

Commonwealth Medicine Publications

A presentation about insurance coverage for health care services and supports for people with disabilities who work. “Wrap-around” coverage (or other policy) options may be a viable solution and support employment among people with disabilities.

Presentation for the 2015 Academy Health Disability Research Interest Group.


Health Care Spending And Financial Security After The Affordable Care Act, Allison K. Hoffman Jan 2015

Health Care Spending And Financial Security After The Affordable Care Act, Allison K. Hoffman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Health insurance has fallen notoriously short of protecting Americans from financial insecurity caused by health care spending. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) attempted to ameliorate this shortcoming by regulating health insurance. The ACA offers a new policy vision of how health insurance will (and perhaps should) serve to promote financial security in the face of health care spending. Yet, the ACA’s policy vision applies differently among insured, based on the type of insurance they have, resulting in inconsistent types and levels of financial protection among Americans.

To examine this picture of inconsistent financial protection, this Article ...


The Power To Block The Affordable Care Act: What Are The Limits?, John D. Kraemer, Lawrence O. Gostin Nov 2012

The Power To Block The Affordable Care Act: What Are The Limits?, John D. Kraemer, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Though Supreme Court upheld most parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Congress’ goals in enacting it could still be frustrated by non-implementation. During his campaign for president, Governor Romney promised “to issue Obamacare waivers to all fifty states.” While such blanket waivers would likely violate the Constitution’s Take Care Clause, the ACA does permit other waivers. To be lawful, however, they must meet certain requirements designed to enhance access and lower cost. A president who opposes the ACA might be able to limit its implementation by refusing to issue premium subsidies in federally operated insurance exchanges, and this ...


The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act: Why It Is Important For Women’S Health, Mary Fanning Oct 2012

The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act: Why It Is Important For Women’S Health, Mary Fanning

Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought

President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on March 23, 2010 ending the long history of disparity in access to health care services between insured and uninsured persons. Disparity between women and men in obtaining health insurance coverage is also corrected in the act. Women’s organizations that have focused attention on women’s distinctive health needs over the past century and a half laid the foundation for provisions in the legislation that address women’s health. This article addresses health insurance coverage, its impact on health, the particular challenges women have confronted ...


Justice Roberts’ America, Robin West Jul 2012

Justice Roberts’ America, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Less than a week after the Roberts Court issued its decision in National Federation of Independent Business v Sebelius, Jeffrey Toobin, writing in The New Yorker, compared the first part of Chief Justice John Roberts's opinion, in which he found that the Commerce Clause did not authorize Congress to enact the "individual mandate" section of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that requires all individuals to buy health insurance, with an Ayn Rand screed, noting that the pivotal sections of the argument were long on libertarian rhetoric but short on citations of authority. Roberts held (although "held" might be stating ...


Affordable Care Act Litigation: The Supreme Court And The Future Of Health Care Reform, Lawrence O. Gostin, Kelli K. Garcia Jan 2012

Affordable Care Act Litigation: The Supreme Court And The Future Of Health Care Reform, Lawrence O. Gostin, Kelli K. Garcia

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In Florida v. HHS, a lawsuit brought on behalf of 26 states challenging the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Supreme Court will determine the future direction of health care reform in the United States. During the unprecedented 5-1/2 hours of oral arguments, the Court will hear 4 issues: the individual purchase mandate, severability, the Medicaid expansion and the Anti-Injunction Act.

The states challenging the ACA maintain that the purchase mandate uniquely penalizes individuals for failing to purchase insurance. Uninsured individuals, however, rarely do nothing. Instead, they self-insure, rely on family, and cost-shift to ...


Three Models Of Health Insurance: The Conceptual Pluralism Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act, Allison K. Hoffman Jan 2011

Three Models Of Health Insurance: The Conceptual Pluralism Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act, Allison K. Hoffman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

What risks should health insurance mitigate? American health scholars, politicians, and the public at large answer this question ambivalently. This Article defines three dominant conceptions of health insurance that weave throughout popular and academic discourse and that echoed in the 2010 health reform debates. The first conception is that health insurance should primarily serve to mitigate harms to health. This “Health Promotion” theory relies on using health insurance to pay for medical care that most cost-effectively preserves and improves health. Alternately, health insurance might primarily mitigate risks to wealth from high medical care costs. This “Financial Security” theory demands that ...


Trust And Betrayal In The Medical Marketplace, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 2002

Trust And Betrayal In The Medical Marketplace, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author argues in this Comment that disingenuity as first resort is an unwise approach to the conflict between our ex ante and our later, illness-endangered selves. Not only does rationing by tacit deceit raise a host of moral problems, it will not work, over the long haul, because markets reward deceit's unmasking. The honesty about clinical limit-setting that some bioethicists urge may not be fully within our reach. But more candor is possible than we now achieve, and the more conscious we are about decisions to impose limits, the more inclined we will be to accept them without ...


Race And Discretion In American Medicine, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 2001

Race And Discretion In American Medicine, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author’s focus in this article is on racial disparities in medical care provision--that is, on differences in the services that clinically similar patients receive when they present to the health care system. Racial disparities in health status, which is not greatly influenced (on a population-wide basis) by medical care, are beyond his scope here. Disparities in medical care access-potential patients' ability, financial and otherwise, to gain entry to the health care system in the first place, are also outside his focus. The author begins this article by putting the problem of racial disparities in medical care provision within ...


Rights And Efficiency In American Health Law, Maxwell Gregg Bloche Jan 1998

Rights And Efficiency In American Health Law, Maxwell Gregg Bloche

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

During the 1960s and 1970s, the individual rights revolution that swept through American society remade much of the nation's health law in its image. Sick people acquired the right to be told of the risks and benefits of proposed treatments and then to give thumbs-up or thumbs-down to their doctors' decisions. Successful suits for medical negligence went from rare to commonplace. Elderly and poor Americans achieved statutory rights of access to publicly funded healthcare, and courts burnished these rights with myriad procedural protections. The critically ill and their families won the right to refuse aggressive, life-sustaining treatments. Psychiatric patients ...


Foreword: Health Care Reform In The United States—The Presidential Task Force, Lawrence O. Gostin Jan 1993

Foreword: Health Care Reform In The United States—The Presidential Task Force, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay serves as the foreword to Implementing U.S. Health Care Reform, a symposium held in 1993.

The exact specifications of the new health care system depend on the package that President Clinton will send to Capitol Hill and the changes that Congress will make in the reform package. Some of the basic structures and organizing principles of the new system that are being considered by the President are already the subject of intense public scrutiny.

The design being considered would involve new relations between the federal government and the states, between the public and private sectors, and between ...