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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Health Information Technology In The United States: The Information Base For Progress, David Blumenthal, Catherine M. Desroches, Karen Donelan, Sara J. Rosenbaum, Timothy Ferris Oct 2006

Health Information Technology In The United States: The Information Base For Progress, David Blumenthal, Catherine M. Desroches, Karen Donelan, Sara J. Rosenbaum, Timothy Ferris

Health Policy and Management Faculty Publications

Health information technology (HIT) has the potential to advance health care quality by helping patients with acute and chronic conditions receive recommended care, diminishing disparities in treatment and reducing medical errors. Nevertheless, HIT dissemination has not occurred rapidly, due in part to the high costs of electronic health record (EHR) systems for providers of care—including the upfront capital investment, ongoing maintenance and short-term productivity loss. Also, many observers are concerned that, if HIT follows patterns observed with other new medical technologies, HIT and EHRs may diffuse in ways that systematically disadvantage vulnerable patient populations, thus increasing or maintaining existing ...


Health And Foreign Policy, David P. Fidler, Nick Drager Jan 2006

Health And Foreign Policy, David P. Fidler, Nick Drager

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Subsidizing Addiction: Do State Health Insurance Mandates Increase Alcohol Consumption?, Jonathan Klick, Thomas Stratmann Jan 2006

Subsidizing Addiction: Do State Health Insurance Mandates Increase Alcohol Consumption?, Jonathan Klick, Thomas Stratmann

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

A model of addiction in which individuals are forward looking implies that as the availability of addiction treatment options grows, individuals will consume more of an addictive good. We test this implication using cross-state variation in the adoption of mental health parity mandates that include substance abuse treatments. We examine the effects of these mandates on the consumption of alcohol and find that parity legislation leads to an increase in alcohol consumption. To account for the possible endogeneity of the adoption of mental health parity mandates, we perform an instrumental variables analysis and find that the ordinary least squares estimation ...


Mandatory Waiting Periods For Abortions And Female Mental Health, Jonathan Klick Jan 2006

Mandatory Waiting Periods For Abortions And Female Mental Health, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Calibrating The Wealth And Health Of Nations: Trade, Health, And Foreign Policy After The Wto's First Decade, David P. Fidler Jan 2006

Calibrating The Wealth And Health Of Nations: Trade, Health, And Foreign Policy After The Wto's First Decade, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

One of the most important themes to emerge from the relationship between trade and health in the first ten year's of the WTO's existence is the challenge of achieving policy coherence. This task is a foreign policy challenge for WTO Members, which requires looking at the relationship between trade and health against the backdrop of the making and implementing of foreign policy. Policy coherence has generally become a major concern for foreign policymakers because post-Cold War trends, such as accelerating globalization, seriously challenge traditional foreign policy assumptions, practices, and institutions. Part of this new context for foreign policy ...


Contesting Anticompetitive Actions Taken In The Name Of The State: State Action Immunity And Health Care Markets, Clark C. Havighurst Jan 2006

Contesting Anticompetitive Actions Taken In The Name Of The State: State Action Immunity And Health Care Markets, Clark C. Havighurst

Faculty Scholarship

The so-called state action doctrine is a judicially created formula for resolving conflicts between federal antitrust policy and state policies that seem to authorize conduct that antitrust law would prohibit. Against the background of recent commentaries by the federal antitrust agencies, this article reviews the doctrine and discusses it's application in the health care sector, focusing on the ability of states to immunize anticompetitive actions by state licensing and regulatory boards, hospital medical staffs, and public hospitals, as well as anticompetitive mergers and agreements. Although states are free, as sovereign governments, to restrict competition, the state action doctrine requires ...


Policy Challenges From The "White" Senate Inquiry Into Workplace-Related Health Impacts Of Toxic Dusts And Nanoparticles, Thomas A. Faunce, Haydn Walters, Trevor Williams, David Bryant, Martin Jennings, Bill Musk Dec 2005

Policy Challenges From The "White" Senate Inquiry Into Workplace-Related Health Impacts Of Toxic Dusts And Nanoparticles, Thomas A. Faunce, Haydn Walters, Trevor Williams, David Bryant, Martin Jennings, Bill Musk

Thomas A Faunce

On 22 June 2005 the Senate of the Commonwealth of Australia voted to establish an inquiry into workplace harm related to toxic dust and emerging technologies (including nanoparticles). The inquiry became known as the "White" Inquiry after Mr Richard White, a financially uncompensated sufferer of industrial sandblasting-induced lung disease who was instrumental in its establishment. The "White" Inquiry delivered its final report and recommendations on 31 May 2006. This paper examines whether these recommendations and their implementation may provide a unique opportunity not only to modernize relevant monitoring standards and processes, but related compensation systems for disease associated with workplace-related ...