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Bioethics and Medical Ethics

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Articles 1 - 30 of 333

Full-Text Articles in Health Law and Policy

Off With Their Heads! How China's Controversial Human Head-Transplant Procedure Exceeds The Parameters Of International Ethical Standards In Human Experimentation, Deena Agamy Jul 2019

Off With Their Heads! How China's Controversial Human Head-Transplant Procedure Exceeds The Parameters Of International Ethical Standards In Human Experimentation, Deena Agamy

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Guantánamo Bodies: Law, Media, And Biopower, Cary Federman, Dave Holmes Apr 2019

Guantánamo Bodies: Law, Media, And Biopower, Cary Federman, Dave Holmes

Cary Federman

The idea of the Guantánamo detainee as a Muselmann, the lowest order of concentration camp inmates, contains within it important implications for the new understanding of sovereignty in the era of Guantánamo, in an age of exception. The purpose of this article is to explain the status of those who are detained at Guantánamo Bay. Stated broadly, in assessing that status, we will emphasize the connection between the altered meaning of sovereignty that has accompanied the placing of prisoners in an American penal colony in Cuba and the biopolitical status of the prisoners who reside there. More particularly, we will ...


Law & Health Care Newsletter, Spring 2019 Apr 2019

Law & Health Care Newsletter, Spring 2019

Law & Health Care Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Biting The Hands That Feed “The Alligators”: A Case Study In Morbid Obesity Extremes, End-Of-Life Care, And Prohibitions On Harming And Accelerating The End Of Life, Michael J. Malinowski Mar 2019

Biting The Hands That Feed “The Alligators”: A Case Study In Morbid Obesity Extremes, End-Of-Life Care, And Prohibitions On Harming And Accelerating The End Of Life, Michael J. Malinowski

Michael J. Malinowski

Obesity, recognized as a disease in the U.S. and at times as a terminal illness due to associated medical complications, is an American epidemic according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”), American Heart Association (“AHA”), and other authorities. More than one third of Americans (39.8% of adults and 18.5% of children) are medically obese. This article focuses on cases of “extreme morbid obesity” (“EMO”)—situations in which death is imminent without aggressive medical interventions, and bariatric surgery is the only treatment option with a realistic possibility of success. Bariatric surgeries themselves are very high ...


Practice-Based Research Networks Ceding To A Single Institutional Review Board, Jeanette M. Daly, Tabria Weiner Harrod, Kate Judge, Leann C. Michaels, Barcey T. Levy, David L. Hahn, Lyle J. Fagnan, Donald E. Nease Jr. Oct 2018

Practice-Based Research Networks Ceding To A Single Institutional Review Board, Jeanette M. Daly, Tabria Weiner Harrod, Kate Judge, Leann C. Michaels, Barcey T. Levy, David L. Hahn, Lyle J. Fagnan, Donald E. Nease Jr.

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

Historically, a single research project involving numerous practice-based research networks (PBRNs) required multiple institutional review boards (IRBs) to be involved in approval of the project. However, to avoid redundancies, federal IRB regulations now allow cooperative research projects that involve more than one institution to use reasonable methods of cooperative IRB review and to cede authority for review and oversight of the project to a single lead IRB. Through ceding, a lead IRB has the authority for review and oversight of the project delegated by all participating sites’ IRBs and becomes the IRB of record for the ceded sites. In the ...


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2018 Oct 2018

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2018

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown Aug 2018

Health Care Referrals Out Of The Shadows: Recognizing The Looming Threat Of The Texas Patient Solicitation Act And Other Illegal Remuneration Statutes, Trenton Brown

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Informed Consent And The Role Of The Treating Physician, Eric Feldman, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Steven Joffe Jun 2018

Informed Consent And The Role Of The Treating Physician, Eric Feldman, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Steven Joffe

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In the century since Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo famously declared that “[e]very human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body,” informed consent has become a central feature of American medical practice. In an increasingly team-based and technology-driven system, however, who is — or ought to be — responsible for obtaining a patient’s consent? Must the treating physician personally provide all the necessary disclosures, or can the consent process, like other aspects of modern medicine, take advantage of specialization and division of labor? Analysis of Shinal v. Toms ...


Cold Genocide: Falun Gong In China, Maria Cheung, Torsten Trey, David Matas, Richard An Jun 2018

Cold Genocide: Falun Gong In China, Maria Cheung, Torsten Trey, David Matas, Richard An

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

The article explores patterns of a cold genocide in the eradication campaign against Falun Gong. Falun Gong is a spiritual practice that has been targeted for eradication by the Chinese regime since 1999. In comparison to the documented cases of genocide, the genocide of Falun Gong stands out as anomalous because it is virtually ignored. The article seeks to elucidate the multi-faceted nature of this concealed genocide from an interdisciplinary perspective encompassing social work, medicine and law, In particular, the article demonstrates that the eradication campaign against Falun Gong is distinguishable as a cold genocide as it is: (1) multi-dimensional ...


A Leap To Hybrid Governance For European Union Healthcare On Organ Donations, Tasnim Ahmed May 2018

A Leap To Hybrid Governance For European Union Healthcare On Organ Donations, Tasnim Ahmed

Journal of Law and Health

This article evaluates two proposals that the Organs Directive along with the commission’s Action Plan 2009-2015 can be viewed as a form of hybrid governance. The Organs Directive is the first legally-binding supranational risk regulation devised in the field of organ donation and transplantation. The Directive is modelled on the earlier Directive dealing with blood, tissue, and cells. The Action Plan, which is soft law, will complement the Directive. The Directive and Action Plan requires additional administration procedures from the Member States with the EU Commission regularly monitoring the implementation of the work programme to ensure it is manageable ...


The Ethics In Synthetics: Statistics In The Service Of Ethics And Law In Health-Related Research In Big Data From Multiple Sources, Sharon Bassan Ph.D., Ofer Harel Ph.D. May 2018

The Ethics In Synthetics: Statistics In The Service Of Ethics And Law In Health-Related Research In Big Data From Multiple Sources, Sharon Bassan Ph.D., Ofer Harel Ph.D.

Journal of Law and Health

An ethical advancement of scientific knowledge demands a delicate equilibrium between benefits and harms, in particular in health-related research. When applying and advancing scientific knowledge or technologies, Article 4 of UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, ethically justifiable research requires maximizing direct and indirect benefits and minimizing possible harms. The National Institution of Health [NIH] Data Sharing Policy and Implementation Guidance similarly states that data necessary for drawing valid conclusions and advancing medical research should be made as widely and freely available as possible (in order to share the benefits) while safeguarding the privacy of participants from ...


Roe V. Wade Case Study Assignment, Barbara Andraka-Christou Apr 2018

Roe V. Wade Case Study Assignment, Barbara Andraka-Christou

Faculty Scholarship and Creative Works

No abstract provided.


Ethical Dilemma Of Alzheimer's Disease And Informed Consent, Daenia La Rodé Apr 2018

Ethical Dilemma Of Alzheimer's Disease And Informed Consent, Daenia La Rodé

Augustana Center for the Study of Ethics Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Spring 2018 Apr 2018

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Spring 2018

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Baby M Turns 30: The Law And Policy Of Surrogate Motherhood, Eric A. Feldman Jan 2018

Baby M Turns 30: The Law And Policy Of Surrogate Motherhood, Eric A. Feldman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This article marks the 30th anniversary of the Supreme Court of New Jersey’s Baby M decision by offering a critical analysis of surrogacy policy in the United States. Despite fundamental changes in both science and society since the case was decided, state courts and legislatures remain bitterly divided on the legality of surrogacy. In arguing for a more uniform, permissive legal posture toward surrogacy, the article addresses five central debates in the surrogacy literature.

First, should the legal system accommodate those seeking conception through surrogacy, or should it prohibit such arrangements? Second, if surrogacy is permitted, what steps can ...


Patent Infringement In Personalized Medicine: Limitations Of The Existing Exemption Mechanisms, Jiyeon Kim Jan 2018

Patent Infringement In Personalized Medicine: Limitations Of The Existing Exemption Mechanisms, Jiyeon Kim

Washington University Law Review

Mr. X suffers from recurrent glioblastoma, a type of deadly brain cancer. One of his physicians reads a study reporting a novel immunotherapy, which uses the chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) technology, leading to regression of glioblastoma in a small number of patients. Although the therapy has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is now offered by two major pharmaceutical companies, it is only approved for certain hematological cancers. In addition, Mr. X’s cancer does not express the biomarker that is necessary for the CAR-T therapy used in the published glioblastoma ...


Biting The Hands That Feed “The Alligators”: A Case Study In Morbid Obesity Extremes, End-Of-Life Care, And Prohibitions On Harming And Accelerating The End Of Life, Michael J. Malinowski Jan 2018

Biting The Hands That Feed “The Alligators”: A Case Study In Morbid Obesity Extremes, End-Of-Life Care, And Prohibitions On Harming And Accelerating The End Of Life, Michael J. Malinowski

Journal Articles

Obesity, recognized as a disease in the U.S. and at times as a terminal illness due to associated medical complications, is an American epidemic according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”), American Heart Association (“AHA”), and other authorities. More than one third of Americans (39.8% of adults and 18.5% of children) are medically obese. This article focuses on cases of “extreme morbid obesity” (“EMO”)—situations in which death is imminent without aggressive medical interventions, and bariatric surgery is the only treatment option with a realistic possibility of success. Bariatric surgeries themselves are very high ...


If We Pay Football Players, Why Not Kidney Donors, Philip J. Cook, Kimberly D. Krawiec Jan 2018

If We Pay Football Players, Why Not Kidney Donors, Philip J. Cook, Kimberly D. Krawiec

Faculty Scholarship

Ethicists who oppose compensating kidney donors claim they do so because kidney donation is risky for the donor’s health, donors may not appreciate the risks and may be cognitively biased in other ways, and donors may come from disadvantaged groups and thus could be exploited. However, few ethical qualms are raised about professional football players, who face much greater health risks than kidney donors, have much less counseling and screening concerning that risk, and who often come from racial and economic groups deemed disadvantaged. It thus seems that either ethicists—and the law—should ban both professional football and ...


Depression: The Often Overlooked Sequela Of Head Trauma, Samuel D. Hodge Jr., Jack E. Hubbard Dec 2017

Depression: The Often Overlooked Sequela Of Head Trauma, Samuel D. Hodge Jr., Jack E. Hubbard

Cleveland State Law Review

Depression is a common sequela of head trauma. Approximately half of all individuals with a cranial injury will experience depression within the first year, regardless of the severity of the injury. The ailment is characterized clinically as a mood disorder, often associated with intense feelings of sadness. However, depression is more complex than mood disorders, as many mental and bodily complaints—such as insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, appetite changes, aches and pains, and lack of interest in previously enjoyable activities—are associated with depression. These intense feelings, particularly when combined with despair and hopelessness, can lead to suicide, a dreaded potential ...


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2017 Oct 2017

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2017

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis Sep 2017

A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis

Browne C Lewis

This Article is divided into four parts. Part I discusses the history and evolution of the "right to die movement" in the United States. The current legal landscape in the United States is examined in Part II. In Part III, I analyze some of the relevant ethical concerns caused by the availability of physician-assisted suicide. My analysis primarily focuses on the Oregon statutes because it is the oldest physician-assisted suicide law in the United States and has served as a model for laws in the United States and abroad. For example, Lord Falconer's Bill, which was defeated by the ...


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Summer 2017 Jul 2017

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Summer 2017

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Germ-Line Gene Editing And Congressional Reaction In Context: Learning From Almost 50 Years Of Congressional Reactions To Biomedical Breakthroughs, Russell A. Spivak, J.D., I. Glenn Cohen, J.D., Eli Y. Adashi, M.D., M.S. Jul 2017

Germ-Line Gene Editing And Congressional Reaction In Context: Learning From Almost 50 Years Of Congressional Reactions To Biomedical Breakthroughs, Russell A. Spivak, J.D., I. Glenn Cohen, J.D., Eli Y. Adashi, M.D., M.S.

Journal of Law and Health

On December 18, 2015, President Obama signed into law a policy rider forestalling the therapeutic modification of the human germ line. The rider, motivated by the science’s potential unethical ends, is only the most recent instance in which the legislature cut short the ongoing national conversation on the acceptability of a developing science. This essay offers historical perspective on what bills were proposed and passed surrounding four other then-developing scientific breakthroughs—Recombinant DNA, in vitro fertilization, Cloning, Stem Cells—to better analyze how Congress is, and should, regulate this exciting and promising science.


Medical Futility And Religious Free Exercise, Teneille R. Brown Jan 2017

Medical Futility And Religious Free Exercise, Teneille R. Brown

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

A tragic scenario has become all too common in hospitals across the United States. Dying patients pray for medical miracles when their physicians think that continuing treatment would render no meaningful benefit. This situation is unfortunately referred to as “medical futility.” In these cases, physicians, who are less likely than their patients to rely on God as a means of coping with major illness, are at an impasse. Their patients request everything be done so that they can have more time for God to intervene, but in the physician’s professional experience, everything will probably do nothing. What is the ...


A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis Jan 2017

A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article is divided into four parts. Part I discusses the history and evolution of the "right to die movement" in the United States. The current legal landscape in the United States is examined in Part II. In Part III, I analyze some of the relevant ethical concerns caused by the availability of physician-assisted suicide. My analysis primarily focuses on the Oregon statutes because it is the oldest physician-assisted suicide law in the United States and has served as a model for laws in the United States and abroad. For example, Lord Falconer's Bill, which was defeated by the ...


Healer, Witness, Or Double Agent? Reexamining The Ethics Of Forensic Psychiatry, Matthew U. Scherer Dec 2016

Healer, Witness, Or Double Agent? Reexamining The Ethics Of Forensic Psychiatry, Matthew U. Scherer

Journal of Law and Health

In recent years, psychiatrists have become ever more prevalent in American courtrooms. Consequently, the issue of when the usual rules of medical ethics should apply to forensic psychiatric encounters has taken on increased importance and is a continuing topic of discussion among both legal and medical scholars. A number of approaches to the problem of forensic psychiatric ethics have been proposed, but none adequately addresses the issues that arise when a forensic encounter develops therapeutic characteristics. This article looks to the rules governing the lawyer-client relationship as a model for a new approach to forensic psychiatric ethics. This new model ...


Quintavalle: The Quandary In Bioethics, Lisa Cherkassky Dec 2016

Quintavalle: The Quandary In Bioethics, Lisa Cherkassky

Journal of Law and Health

The case of R. (Quintavalle) v. Human Fertilisation Embryology Authority (and Secretary of State for Health) presents a handful of legal problems. The biggest legal query to arise from the case is the inevitable harvest of babies, toddlers and very young children for their bone marrow. This article unpacks the judicial story behind Quintavalle to reveal how the strict provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 - namely ‘suitable condition’ under schedule 2 paragraph 1(1)(a) and ‘treatment services’ and ‘assisting’ under section 2(1) - were widely misinterpreted to introduce the social selection of embryos into law. The ...


Quality Of Death People With Terminal Illnesses Are Turning To An Age-Old Method To End It All: Self-Starvation, Kazi E. Awal, Alyssa Pagano Dec 2016

Quality Of Death People With Terminal Illnesses Are Turning To An Age-Old Method To End It All: Self-Starvation, Kazi E. Awal, Alyssa Pagano

Capstones

Voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED) is getting more attention in the medical community. Though physician assisted dying legislation passed in two more states in 2016--there are now 7 states where it is legal--the practice, where doctors prescribe a lethal dose of sedatives so that terminally ill patients can end their own lives, is inaccessible to many. But fasting to death is a way for patients suffering from terminal illnesses or other debilitating diseases to end their lives on their own terms that is legal everywhere. As extreme as it sounds, research shows the process can be made comfortable with ...


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2016 Oct 2016

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2016

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Neuroethics: Neurolaw, Stephen J. Morse Sep 2016

Neuroethics: Neurolaw, Stephen J. Morse

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This is a pre-copyedited version of a chapter in the Oxford Handbooks Online (Philosophy) edited by Sandy Goldberg. In altered form, it was published online in February, 2017 and can be found at the Oxford Handbooks Online website. The entry discusses whether the findings of the new neuroscience based largely on functional brain imaging raise new normative questions and entail normative conclusions for ethical and legal theory and practice. After reviewing the source of optimism about neuroscientific contributions and the current scientific status of neuroscience, it addresses a radical challenge neuroscience allegedly presents: whether neuroscience proves persons do not have ...