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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Billy-Bob Teeth Saves Porn Star: Coping With Defective Work-For-Hire Registrations, Thomas G. Field May 2011

Billy-Bob Teeth Saves Porn Star: Coping With Defective Work-For-Hire Registrations, Thomas G. Field

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “This paper begins by briefly reviewing statutory provisions that determine initial copyright ownership, govern title transfers, establish requisites to infringement litigation, and bar untimely suits.

It then examines Billy-Bob Teeth and Jules Jordan Video and explains how, in the latter case, the Ninth Circuit applied rationales adopted by the Seventh Circuit in the former case to overturn a JMOL unfavorable to an "adult film" star.

The third part of the paper reviews use of the copyright statute of limitations to resolve competing ownership claims.

The last part of the paper, flagging important differences between § 201(b) and § 204(a ...


Drawing A Line In The Sand: When A Curator Becomes A Creator, Megan M. Carpenter Mar 2011

Drawing A Line In The Sand: When A Curator Becomes A Creator, Megan M. Carpenter

Law Faculty Scholarship

Over the last twenty years, audience attendance at museums, galleries, and performing arts institutions in the United States has decreased dramatically. Major museums and galleries are considering ways to add engaging and meaningful value to the user experience with technology, from incorporating user-generated content to creating multimedia installations billed as “collaborative” works.

In 2010, the Dallas Museum of Art’s Coastlines: Images of Land and Sea exhibition featured landscapes from 1850 to the present, as well as a sound installation composed by students and faculty in the Arts and Technology program at the University of Texas at Dallas, which played ...


Antitrust, Governance, And Postseason College Football, Michael Mccann Jan 2011

Antitrust, Governance, And Postseason College Football, Michael Mccann

Law Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the compatibility of the Bowl Championship Series (“BCS”) with federal antitrust law and the appropriateness of the federal government using its formal and informal powers to encourage a new format for postseason college football. The Article begins by examining the legality of the BCS under Sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Antitrust Act. It then discusses the appropriateness of government actors concerning themselves with, and expending taxpayer dollars on, the scheduling of college football games. The Article concludes by offering possible changes to the scheduling structure of postseason college football, with an emphasis on voluntary, efficiency-promoting ...