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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja Jan 2017

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article considers the current licensing regime used to control the exploitation of copyright protected works within the online interactive entertainment sector—particularly virtual worlds including multiplayer online games—to further author new copyrightable works. This article aims to identify the gaps that have arisen on account of the nature of these subsequently authored works and the potential for their exploitation under the said licensing regime. Users and the proprietors of virtual worlds often end up in conflict over the monetization and commercialization of user generated content on account of contradictory yet overlapping rights created by copyright law when controlled ...


Living To See His Glory Days: Why Hamilton's Lin Manuel Miranda Is Not Liable For Copyright Infringement, But Other Writers And Composers Are, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 92 (2017), Deidre Davis Jan 2017

Living To See His Glory Days: Why Hamilton's Lin Manuel Miranda Is Not Liable For Copyright Infringement, But Other Writers And Composers Are, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 92 (2017), Deidre Davis

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This comment discusses the idea of individuals receiving preliminary permissions of copyrighted works before using the work as a component of their own. By doing so, an individual has a better opportunity to avoid copyright infringement. Lin Manuel Miranda, the writer of the musical Hamilton, took preliminary measures to avoid copyright infringement, and these measures will be examined throughout this comment. Copyright infringement cases and other infringement cases will be addressed, as well as a proposal to simplify obtaining preliminary permissions in copyrighted works.


Restoring Rogers: Video Games, False Association Claims, And The “Explicitly Misleading” Use Of Trademarks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 306 (2017), William K. Ford Jan 2017

Restoring Rogers: Video Games, False Association Claims, And The “Explicitly Misleading” Use Of Trademarks, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 306 (2017), William K. Ford

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Courts have long struggled with how to balance false association claims brought under the Lanham Act with the protections for speech under the First Amendment. The leading approach is the Rogers test, but this test comes in multiple forms with varying degrees of protection for speech. A substantial portion of the litigation raising this issue now involves video games, a medium that more so than others, likely needs the benefit of a clear rule that protects speech. The original version of the test is the simplest and the one most protective of speech. In 2013, the Ninth Circuit endorsed the ...


The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein Jan 2017

The Ambush At Rio, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 350 (2017), Adam Epstein

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The purpose of this article is to explore the role of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) codified marketing policy known as Rule 40 which emerged to prevent ambush marketing of its biennial events. Rule 40 has quickly evolved into a controversial rule for athletes, coaches and sponsors alike who are involved in the Olympic Movement. The IOC believes that social media is a ubiquitous threat to its intellectual property during the Olympic Games akin to traditional print and television ambush marketing campaigns. As a result, the 2016 Rio De Janeiro (Rio) Summer Olympic Games represented the most intense clash ...


If The Shoe Fits: The Effects Of A Uniform Copyright Design Test On Local Fashion Designers, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 262 (2017), Elise Ruff Jan 2017

If The Shoe Fits: The Effects Of A Uniform Copyright Design Test On Local Fashion Designers, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 262 (2017), Elise Ruff

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Fashion design is a revolutionary walking art form, becoming increasingly accessible to consumers. The increase in accessibility is, in part, due to the presence of technology and social media platforms. While this allows the consumer to have access to a designer’s goods at unprecedented levels, this has led to an increase in claims of copyright infringement against large fashion corporations. This comment discusses how local-based fashion designers have lodged complaints against large fashion corporations of stealing their designs. Additionally, this comment discusses a recent United States Supreme Court case Star Athletica, L.L.C., v. Varsity Brands, Inc., and ...


If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor Jan 2017

If It's In The Game: Is There Liability For User-Generated Characters' Likeness?, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 291 (2017), Jason Zenor

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In cases like Keller and No Doubt v. Activision, the federal courts held that the use of celebrity's likeness was a violation of the right of publicity. In response, EA Sports suspended production of college sports games. But most games still allow for gamers to create their own avatars. With game systems now being connected, gamers can download user-created content many of which will have the likeness of famous people, thus circumventing the holdings in Keller and No Doubt. Accordingly, this article examines how this type of user generated content fits within the law of appropriation. First, this article ...


Gotta Catch . . . A Lawsuit? A Legal Insight Into The Intellectual, Civil, And Criminal Battlefield Pokémon Go Has Downloaded Onto Smartphones And Properties Around The World, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 329 (2017), Andrew Rossow Jan 2017

Gotta Catch . . . A Lawsuit? A Legal Insight Into The Intellectual, Civil, And Criminal Battlefield Pokémon Go Has Downloaded Onto Smartphones And Properties Around The World, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 329 (2017), Andrew Rossow

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Our society, and its millennials, have entered the digital age, whereby almost everything is conducted and perpetuated through electronic devices. Smartphones have dominated the mobile device market and have allowed its users to download mobile applications and games to the device. Pokémon Go, is the latest trend in mobile gaming and the start to a bright future of augmented reality. But what happens when augmented reality meets the physical world? Do our modern-day statutes and laws extend into the cyberspace that it is augmented reality? What happens when a user of an augmented reality game enters onto the property of ...


Trying On Trade Dress: Using Trade Dress To Protect The Look And Feel Of Video Games, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 109 (2017), Benjamin Lockyer Jan 2017

Trying On Trade Dress: Using Trade Dress To Protect The Look And Feel Of Video Games, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 109 (2017), Benjamin Lockyer

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

With the creation of video games for smart phones, video games are some of the most accessible forms of entertainment on the market. What was once only an attraction inside the designated location of arcade halls, is now within the grip of nearly every smart phone user. With new game apps for smart phones going viral on a regular basis, the video game industry has become one of the most profitable in the entertainment realm. However, the industry's overall success has also led to increased competition amongst game developers. As a result, competing developers create near exact copies of ...


Candidates Shouldn’T “Cruz” Through Political Campaigns: Why Asking For Permission To Use Music Is Becoming So Important On The Campaign Trail, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 457 (2017), Courtney Willits Jan 2017

Candidates Shouldn’T “Cruz” Through Political Campaigns: Why Asking For Permission To Use Music Is Becoming So Important On The Campaign Trail, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 457 (2017), Courtney Willits

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Music has always been used by candidates running for political office as a way to advertise themselves to potential voters. Throughout the years, a battle between political candidates and musicians has grown due to problems caused by music licensing. Currently, an issue in law exists between politicians who obtain proper music licenses versus musicians who have a right of publicity, stating they do not want to be associated with certain candidates' political views. This comment analyzes the recent copyright case against former 2016 presidential candidate Ted Cruz, and the role it could play in this area of law. Additionally, this ...


The Depiction Of Trademarked Landmarks In Fictional Films: Protecting Filmmakers From Infringement And Dilution Liability, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 676 (2016), Joel Timmer Jan 2016

The Depiction Of Trademarked Landmarks In Fictional Films: Protecting Filmmakers From Infringement And Dilution Liability, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 676 (2016), Joel Timmer

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Many well-known landmarks, like the Empire State Building, are protected as trademarks. This trademark status may be used by trademark holders to attempt to control or limit the depictions of those landmarks in artistic works like feature films. Using the trademarked Hollywood Sign as an example, this article examines the status of landmarks as trademarks as well as the protections trademark holders have over unauthorized depictions of trademarked landmarks through actions for trademark infringement or trademark dilution. Concluding that trademark dilution is more likely the proper cause of action for the unauthorized depiction of trademarks in films, this article then ...


That Old Familiar Sting: Tattoos, Publicity, And Copyright, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 762 (2016), Matthew Parker Jan 2016

That Old Familiar Sting: Tattoos, Publicity, And Copyright, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 762 (2016), Matthew Parker

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Tattoos have experienced a significant rise in popularity over the last several decades, and in particular an explosion in popularity in the 2000s and 2010s. Despite this rising popularity and acceptance, the actual mechanics of tattoo ownership and copyright remain very much an issue of first impression before the courts. A series of high-priced lawsuits involving famous athletes and celebrities have come close to the Supreme Court at times, but were ultimately settled before any precedent could be set. This article describes a history of tattoos and how they might be seen to fit in to existing copyright law, and ...


The Invisible Defense Against Music Piracy, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 297 (2016), Paige Clark Jan 2016

The Invisible Defense Against Music Piracy, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 297 (2016), Paige Clark

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Music piracy has continued to affect the music industry. Specifically, music-streaming service providers that thought they were protected, such as Spotify, have suffered from music piracy as a result of innovative illegal downloading websites. Music pirates have created illegal downloading websites that provide detailed and efficient ways to download and sync music from Spotify without paying for the premium services or membership fees. As a result, illegal downloading has had an adverse impact on various music-streaming service providers’ copyrights. To obtain protection and diminish music piracy and liability to music artists and labels, these music-streaming sites should give thought to ...


Blurring The Line: An Examination Of Technological Fact-Finding In Music Copyright Law, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 115 (2016), Jeremy Aregood Jan 2016

Blurring The Line: An Examination Of Technological Fact-Finding In Music Copyright Law, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 115 (2016), Jeremy Aregood

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The result of Williams v. Bridgeport Music, Inc. highlights a major issue in musical plagiarism factfinding. Different circuits employ different tests for fact-finding, however all the tests involve some form of objective criteria that is guided by expert witnesses who perform musical analyses. Because expert witnesses influence their analysis with their own subjective interpretations of the music, and because juries are not fully aware of the distinction between objective and subjective analysis, juries have a distinct possibility of returning a verdict that contradicts the evidence and public policy. New advancements in technology and computation may assist courts in evaluating the ...


The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith Jan 2016

The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage: A Crime Against Property Or A Crime Against People?, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 336 (2016), Patty Gerstenblith

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The destruction of cultural heritage has played a prominent role in the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Iraq and in the recent conflict in Mali. This destruction has displayed the failure of international law to effectively deter these actions. This article reviews existing international law in light of this destruction and the challenges posed by the issues of non-international armed conflict, non-state actors and the military necessity exception. By examining recent developments in applicable international law, the article proposes that customary international law has evolved to interpret existing legal instruments and doctrines concerning cultural heritage in light of the principles ...


From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris Jan 2016

From Tragedy To Triumph In The Pursuit Of Looted Art: Altmann, Benningson, Portrait Of Wally, Von Saher And Their Progeny, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 394 (2016), Donald Burris

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article is a broad and approachable overview of American law regarding the potential repatriation of Nazi-looted art—an area which the author and his now-retired partner, Randy Schoenberg, helped develop from the ground up starting with the development of the Altmann case, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2004, and continuing on through a number of fascinating looted-art cases of a more recent vintage. Parts of the article read as much like a detective story as a summary of cases and Mr. Burris has been kind enough to share both his approach to these cases and his ...


Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline Jan 2016

Where Are We And Where Are We Going: Legal Developments In Cultural Property And Nazi Art Looting, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 435 (2016), Thomas Kline

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi Jan 2016

Illusory Borders: The Myth Of The Modern Nation-State And Its Impact On The Repatriation Of Cultural Artifacts, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 486 (2016), Lubna El-Gendi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

While the current world order of independent nation-states may seem like a natural state that has existed for centuries, in reality, it is a relatively new development that was forged after the demise of imperial rule. Yet, the nation-state is the foundational entity of our current international political and legal framework. International treaties and relations are structured around the nation-state, which is recognized as the core entity in which rights are vested and on which obligations are imposed. This prioritization of the nation-state leads to issues when we consider the repatriation of cultural heritage, particularly in light of the history ...


Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes Jan 2016

Cultural Plunder And Restitution And Human Identity, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 460 (2016), Ori Soltes

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Student-Athletes Put Full-Court Pressure On The Ncaa For Their Rights, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 276 (2016), Taylor Riskin Jan 2016

Student-Athletes Put Full-Court Pressure On The Ncaa For Their Rights, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 276 (2016), Taylor Riskin

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The struggle between the NCAA and student-athletes is one that will not slow down. The issue is whether the mandatory student-athlete agreement is reasonable and, further, if student-athletes should be compensated for the use of their likeness? The answers to these questions are crucial with over a century of tradition on the line. This comment analyzes the recent Ninth Circuit decision through an antitrust and right of publicity lens. Additionally, this comment proposes a solution that allows student-athletes to receive some type of compensation while the NCAA preserves amateurism.


Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray Jan 2016

Nagpra And Its Limitations: Repatriation Of Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 472 (2016), Kevin Ray

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The historical conditions under which indigenous (and specifically Native American) cultural heritage objects have been collected present tremendous difficulties, since collecting efforts were frequently influenced, or even directed, by racist or colonialist ideologies. Recent decades have seen efforts to redress past wrongs, as well as to correct misunderstandings and misrepresentations. The restitution and repatriation processes of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, enacted as human rights legislation, provide powerful, but imperfect tools for the protection of Native American cultural heritage. The challenges are both domestic and international. Recent French auction sales of Hopi, Zuni, and Navajo ...


Let It Go? A Comparative Analysis Of Copyright Law And Enforcement In The United States Of America And China, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 584 (2016), Kevin Fleming Jan 2016

Let It Go? A Comparative Analysis Of Copyright Law And Enforcement In The United States Of America And China, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 584 (2016), Kevin Fleming

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Cheap, knockoff designer items have flooded the streets of China for years. These products infringe on the copyrights of the manufacturers but are rarely enforced. China has attempted to revise their copyright laws to offer more protection to copyright owners, but this has not yet occurred. This comment examines two recent occurrences of copyrighted works in the United States of America being infringed upon in China. This comment examines the how a court or tribunal would rule applying American copyright law and Chinese Copyright law, while also examining the possible remedies that could result. This comment also proposes possible solutions ...


Did Copyright Kill The Radio Star? Why The Recorded Music Industry And Copyright Act Should Welcome Webcasters Into The Fold, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 292 (2015), Patrick Koncel Jan 2015

Did Copyright Kill The Radio Star? Why The Recorded Music Industry And Copyright Act Should Welcome Webcasters Into The Fold, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 292 (2015), Patrick Koncel

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The Copyright Act has not kept pace with the times, and the next revolution is going full stream ahead. Rather than adapt, entrenched interests at the Copyright table push for more protection, while new technologies are demonized and underrepresented. The resulting Copyright Act’s provisions relating to internet-based radio, ranging from passive over-the-air broadcasts to fully interactive music hosting sites, are a patchwork of accommodations and concessions to these interests. For all non-interactive services, licensing music typically occurs within the Copyright Act’s compulsory licensing system. For interactive webcasters, licensing negotiations take place with the copyright holders directly. These negotiations ...


On Art Attacks: At The Confluence Of Shock, Appropriation, And The Law, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 392 (2015), Rachel Buker Jan 2015

On Art Attacks: At The Confluence Of Shock, Appropriation, And The Law, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 392 (2015), Rachel Buker

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Does the law adequately recognize the expansive nature of art, especially in scenarios involving controversial acts of appropriation art? Of particular curiosity is just how the law should treat acts of artistic appropriation involving the creation of artwork on top of other original works of art, or art attacks. This is an issue that has been largely unaddressed by the courts outside the realm of criminal proceedings. However, the legal implications of such acts reach far beyond crimes and property torts, involving copyright, moral rights, freedom of expression, and the preservation of cultural heritage. Indeed, the issues are not just ...


The Next Great Copyright Act And The Future Of Radio, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 378 (2015), Christopher Doval, Don Anque, Maesea Mccalpin Jan 2015

The Next Great Copyright Act And The Future Of Radio, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 378 (2015), Christopher Doval, Don Anque, Maesea Mccalpin

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

With the advancement of digital broadcasting technologies, the lack of a revision to copyright law has created a creative and distribution bottleneck for artists by companies. The current range for compulsory licensing agreements does not protect the interests of artists through modern digital transmission tools, and leaves them fending for themselves if they wish to have access to new digital platforms. Moreover organizations, such as the Recording Industry Association of America, are in greater positions of power when applying existing copyright laws and definitions to new technologies that innovators never intended to be analogous to pre-existing technologies to begin with ...


A Rose By Any Other Name: How An Illusionist Used Copyright Law As A Patent, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 357 (2015), Sydney Beckman Jan 2015

A Rose By Any Other Name: How An Illusionist Used Copyright Law As A Patent, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 357 (2015), Sydney Beckman

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Teller is a famous illusionist who, in recent years, has been performing a stage act with Penn Jillete in Las Vegas, Nevada. Teller’s signature trick, known as “Shadows,” was copied by a magician in Belgium who offered to sell the method. The Belgian’s trick, titled “The Rose and Her Shadow,” was virtually identical to Teller’s illusion. That which we call a rose by any other name . . . Teller wanted the Belgian magician to stop offering the trick for sale. After an unsuccessful attempt to negotiate, Teller took his dispute to federal court. His goal? To protect that which ...


Who's The Vandal? The Recent Controversy Over The Destruction Of 5pointz And How Much Protection Does Moral Rights Law Give To Authorized Aerosol Art?, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2015), Susanna Frederick Fischer Jan 2015

Who's The Vandal? The Recent Controversy Over The Destruction Of 5pointz And How Much Protection Does Moral Rights Law Give To Authorized Aerosol Art?, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 326 (2015), Susanna Frederick Fischer

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This paper considers the extent to which federal moral rights law protects authorized graffiti and aerosol art against destruction, in the context of the controversy over the destruction of 5Pointz. 5Pointz, a sprawling complex of warehouse buildings in Queens, was a Mecca for aerosol art. The buildings’ owners ordered the demolition of 5Pointz after the November 2013 order by New York federal district judge Frederic Block denying the artists a preliminary injunction to stop destruction under the federal moral rights statute, the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA). This paper argues that Judge Block erred in finding that the transient nature ...


The Law As Art Material, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 418 (2015), Daniel Mellis Jan 2015

The Law As Art Material, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 418 (2015), Daniel Mellis

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Daniel Mellis is an artist who incorporates the law and legal language into his work. This article discusses four such works: I. A postcard that predicts when its copyright will expire. II. A performance piece that uses the Visual Artists Rights Act to turn money into Art. III. An installation about the fourth amendment on the paper bags at a liquor store. IV. A bureaucratic entity that allows people to renounce, not their citizenship, but rather their symbolic attachment in a nation state or empire.


Bad News Birkins: Counterfeit In Luxury Brands, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 249 (2015), Colleen Jordan Orscheln Jan 2015

Bad News Birkins: Counterfeit In Luxury Brands, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 249 (2015), Colleen Jordan Orscheln

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The luxury fashion industry spends millions of dollars each year fighting counterfeits, yet a fake Louis Vuitton bag is easily purchased on street corners around the world. Proponents of the counterfeits argue that the fakes translate to advertising for the brands, while the luxury brands argue that it damages the future of their brand. The counterfeit market has been linked to child labor, human trafficking, organized crime, and some terrorist groups. The current federal civil and criminal statutes exclude purchasers from prosecution and instead focus on the distributors of the goods. This comment proposes the strengthening of these laws by ...


How Law Defines Art, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 314 (2015), Derek Fincham Jan 2015

How Law Defines Art, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 314 (2015), Derek Fincham

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Defining art is both hard and subjective. But in lots of contexts the law must arrive at a just solution to hard and subjective questions. The art community has largely neglected the task of defining artworks. This neglect has crept into legal disputes, particularly those involving conceptual art which has loosened the limits of aesthetics, form, function, and composition. This makes crafting a definition of art even more challenging. Yet the Law has an important part to play in resolving art disputes—courts end up defining art no matter how cautiously they approach the question. They do not set out ...


The Conflict Between An Athlete’S Right Of Publicity And The First Amendment, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 117 (2015), Edward Kuester Jan 2015

The Conflict Between An Athlete’S Right Of Publicity And The First Amendment, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 117 (2015), Edward Kuester

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The recent rise of fantasy sports has created a conflict between an athlete’s right of publicity and the First Amendment of the Constitution. The legal question being discussed is whether athletes have a right of publicity in their identity, specifically their performance statistics and biographical information. If a right of publicity violation does exist, courts will have to determine whether a fantasy provider’s First Amendment privilege can prevail against an athlete’s publicity rights. This comment examines recent litigation surrounding athletes’ identities and the problems courts have in balancing the conflict between an athlete’s right of publicity ...