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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Copyright And The Tragedy Of The Common, Tracy Reilly Dec 2013

Copyright And The Tragedy Of The Common, Tracy Reilly

Tracy Reilly

In his 1968 article, The Tragedy of the Commons, biologist Garret Hardin first described his theory on the ecological unsustainability of collective human behavior, claiming that commonly held real property interests would not ultimately be supportable due to the competing individual interests of all who use the property. In the legal field, Hardin’s article is frequently cited to support various theories related to real property and environmental law issues such as ownership, redistribution of wealth, pollution, over population, and global warming. Most scholars claim that a tragedy of the commons does not exist in intellectual property-related goods due to ...


The “Spiritual Temperature” Of Contemporary Popular Music: An Alternative To The Legal Regulation Of Death-Metal And Gangsta-Rap Lyrics, Tracy Reilly Dec 2008

The “Spiritual Temperature” Of Contemporary Popular Music: An Alternative To The Legal Regulation Of Death-Metal And Gangsta-Rap Lyrics, Tracy Reilly

Tracy Reilly

The purpose of this Article is to contribute to the volume of legal scholarship that focuses on popular music lyrics and their effects on children. This interdisciplinary cross-section of law and culture has been analyzed by legal scholars, philosophers, and psychologists throughout history. This Article specifically focuses on the recent public uproar over the increasingly violent and lewd content of death metal and gangsta -rap music and its alleged negative influence on children. Many legal scholars have written about how legal and political efforts throughout history to regulate contemporary genres of popular music in the name of the protection of ...


Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll Nov 2006

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll

Michael W. Carroll

Many participants in the music industry consider unauthorized downloading of music files over the Internet to be “theft” of their “property.” Many Internet users who exchange music files reject that characterization. Prompted by this dispute, this Article explores how those who create and distribute music first came to look upon music as their property and when in Western history the law first supported this view. By analyzing the economic and legal structures governing musicmaking in Western Europe from the classical period in Greece through the Renaissance, the Article shows that the law first granted some exclusive rights in the Middle ...