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Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca Dec 2014

Work Made For Hire – Analyzing The Multifactor Balancing Test, Ryan G. Vacca

Ryan G. Vacca

Authorship, and hence, initial ownership of copyrighted works is oftentimes controlled by the 1976 Copyright Act’s work made for hire doctrine. This doctrine states that works created by employees within the scope of their employment result in the employer owning the copyright. One key determination in this analysis is whether the hired party is an employee or independent contractor. In 1989, the U.S. Supreme Court, in CCNV v. Reid, answered the question of how employees are distinguished from independent contractors by setting forth a list of factors courts should consider. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court did not give further ...


Attack Of The Cheerleaders! Allegations Of Violations Of The Flsa On An Uncertain Landscape, Adam Epstein Dec 2014

Attack Of The Cheerleaders! Allegations Of Violations Of The Flsa On An Uncertain Landscape, Adam Epstein

Adam Epstein

In 2013-14, several lawsuits were brought by National Football League (NFL) cheerleaders who claimed that their respective football clubs violated federal or state law with regard to violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the 1938 federal act that mandates the minimum wage, overtime provisions, and so on. Interestingly, and at the same time, national discourse manifest itself over possibly increasing the federal, state and local minimum wage with various states and cities voting in favor of increasing their minimum wage. The purpose of this article is to explore the recent claims by certain NFL cheerleaders and to analyze ...