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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

The Blue Devil's In The Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work, David A. Grenardo Apr 2019

The Blue Devil's In The Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work, David A. Grenardo

Pepperdine Law Review

Everyone involved in the business of major college athletics, except the athletes, receives compensation based on a free market system. The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) cap on athlete compensation violates antitrust law, and athletes should be allowed to earn their free market value as everyone else does in this country. This Article provides a detailed approach to compensating college athletes under a free market model, which includes a salary cap, the terms of a proposed standard player’s contract, a discussion of who can represent players, and payment simulations for football and basketball teams. A free market approach ...


Is The Ncaa Finally Loosening Its Iron Grip On College Basketball By Allowing Underclassmen The Opportunity To Return To College After Declaring For The Nba Draft?, Neil Patel Jun 2017

Is The Ncaa Finally Loosening Its Iron Grip On College Basketball By Allowing Underclassmen The Opportunity To Return To College After Declaring For The Nba Draft?, Neil Patel

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Oversight Committee has proposed a new rule that allows undergraduate college basketball players to reject the National Basketball Association (NBA) and return to school after they have submitted their name for the draft. This rule represents a great change in the policies that regulate college sports, specifically college basketball. The NCAA has ruled college basketball with an iron fist, but with this new proposal, it seems that it is beginning to help our college athletes sustain some semblance of a normal life after their playing days are over. Importantly, the rule is merely a ...


The End Of An Era: The Mounting Challenges To The Ncaa’S Model Of Amateurism, John Niemeyer Jul 2015

The End Of An Era: The Mounting Challenges To The Ncaa’S Model Of Amateurism, John Niemeyer

Pepperdine Law Review

In the six years between 2006 and 2012, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), a nonprofit organization made up of universities, doubled its net assets to its current, unprecedented level of over $566 million. In 2012 alone, the organization retained a $71 million surplus after it disbursed a majority of its revenue to the NCAA member universities. It was able to make this much money largely because of the television revenue earned from the highly popular and entertaining sports of men’s football and men’s basketball. One would think that if a nonprofit organization could retain $71 million at ...


Head Injuries, Student Welfare, And Saving College Football: A Game Plan For The Ncaa, Rodney K. Smith Apr 2014

Head Injuries, Student Welfare, And Saving College Football: A Game Plan For The Ncaa, Rodney K. Smith

Pepperdine Law Review

This article sets forth a challenging but viable game plan for protecting the health and well-being of intercollegiate football players. Acting proactively will help revitalize the NCAA's brand of competitive, student-centered athletics. This article consists of three parts: The Problem of Head Injuries in College Football; Solving the Problem of Head Injuries in College Football; and Conclusion.


A Modest Proposal For Taming The Antitrust Beast, Gabe Feldman Apr 2014

A Modest Proposal For Taming The Antitrust Beast, Gabe Feldman

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


An Antitrust Exemption For The Ncaa: Sound Policy Or Letting The Fox Loose In The Henhouse?, Daniel E. Lazaroff Apr 2014

An Antitrust Exemption For The Ncaa: Sound Policy Or Letting The Fox Loose In The Henhouse?, Daniel E. Lazaroff

Pepperdine Law Review

This Article focuses on the issues presented by the debate over granting the NCAA an exemption from federal antitrust law. Part II briefly describes the history of antitrust litigation involving the NCAA. Part III discusses some of the proposals for affording some type of antitrust immunity to the NCAA. Part IV explains the rationales utilized for some of the numerous antitrust exemptions Congress and the Supreme Court have created for some businesses and forms of commercial activity. Part V addresses the question of whether any of those rationales justifies providing the NCAA with a legislative or judicial antitrust exemption and ...


A Channel Worth Changing? The Individual Regional Sports Network: Proliferation, Profits, Parity, And The Potential Administrative And Antitrust Issues That Could Follow, Stephen Dixon Nov 2013

A Channel Worth Changing? The Individual Regional Sports Network: Proliferation, Profits, Parity, And The Potential Administrative And Antitrust Issues That Could Follow, Stephen Dixon

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.