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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

The Production Of Law (And Cinema), Amnon Reichman Feb 2007

The Production Of Law (And Cinema), Amnon Reichman

ExpressO

The essay addresses the emergence of the law and cinema discourse, its methodological limits, and its intellectual and pragmatic potential. The essay suggests that current arguments within the discourse can be classified into structural arguments (referring to the manner in which cinematic and judicial practices are "structured" in society), methodological arguments (referring to law and cinema as methodological instruments for the examination of certain clashes of interests), and hermeneutic arguments (referring to law and cinema as engaged in interpretative functions that illuminate aspects of the human condition). Beyond taxonomy, the essay suggests that situating law alongside cinema is important because ...


A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp Oct 2006

A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

The trend of the eminent domain reform and "Kelo plus" initiatives is toward a comprehensive Constitutional property right incorporating the elements of level of review, nature of government action, and extent of compensation. This article contains a draft amendment which reflects these concerns.


Bond Repudiation, Tax Codes, The Appropriations Process And Restitution Post-Eminent Domain Reform, John H. Ryskamp Jun 2006

Bond Repudiation, Tax Codes, The Appropriations Process And Restitution Post-Eminent Domain Reform, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

This brief comment suggests where the anti-eminent domain movement might be heading next.


The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann Jun 2006

The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann

ExpressO

This Comment discusses how television shows such as CSI and Law & Order create heightened juror expectations. This will be published in the Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal's 2005-2006 issue.


Defamation, Antidiscrimination And The Incredible Shrinking Actress, Amrita Mallik Jun 2006

Defamation, Antidiscrimination And The Incredible Shrinking Actress, Amrita Mallik

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Final Offer Arbitration In The New Era Of Major League Baseball, Spencer B. Gordon May 2006

Final Offer Arbitration In The New Era Of Major League Baseball, Spencer B. Gordon

ExpressO

This article provides a comprehensive analysis of the economic, athletic, and social impact of final offer salary arbitration in Major League Baseball (“MLB”). The article delves into the motivations, fluctuations, and evolution of the player-owner relationship and free agency. The commentary then focuses on the distinguishing features and intricacies of final offer arbitration. Although salary arbitration in the context of Major League Baseball is a topic oft discussed in the law review setting, the analysis rarely reaches the level exhibited in this article. Moreover, most articles on the subject were written between 1996 and 2000 when the 1994 players’ strike ...


Harry Potter And The Three-Second Crime: Are We Vanishing The De Minimis Defense From Copyright Law?, Julie Cromer Sep 2005

Harry Potter And The Three-Second Crime: Are We Vanishing The De Minimis Defense From Copyright Law?, Julie Cromer

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Utility Of A Bright-Line Rule In Copyright Law: Freeing Judges From Aesthetic Controversy And Conceptual Separability In Leicester V. Warner Bros., John B. Fowles Mar 2005

The Utility Of A Bright-Line Rule In Copyright Law: Freeing Judges From Aesthetic Controversy And Conceptual Separability In Leicester V. Warner Bros., John B. Fowles

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


The Rave Act: A Specious Solution To The Serious Problem Of Increased Ecstasy Distribution Within The United States That Is Unconstitutionally Overbroad, Erin Treacy Sep 2004

The Rave Act: A Specious Solution To The Serious Problem Of Increased Ecstasy Distribution Within The United States That Is Unconstitutionally Overbroad, Erin Treacy

ExpressO

The RAVE Act amends the 1986 "Crackhouse Statute" on the assumption that electronic music concerts are comparable to crackhouses. This article submits that the rationale behind the former Crackhouse statute does not logically support the RAVE Act and that the new law, as enacted, is unconstitutionally overbroad, infringing upon First Amendment rights. This article shows that the “rave culture,” its associated drug use and electronic music performances (sometimes known as raves) are not inextricably linked. The article also explores policy arguments that may be asserted against the RAVE Act and provides suggestions on how to amend the existing statute to ...


Something Fishy, Tamara R. Piety Mar 2004

Something Fishy, Tamara R. Piety

ExpressO

The story of how one law professor encountered "Moby-Dick" and found therein a reading that offered an opportunity to introduce students to several general themes that resound in the study of law including the question of the function of law, the role of interpretation by analogy, formalism and many others.


All The Lizards Stand And Say “Yes Yes Yes” : The Element Of Play In Legal Actions Against Animals And Inanimate Objects, Anna Pervukhin Oct 2003

All The Lizards Stand And Say “Yes Yes Yes” : The Element Of Play In Legal Actions Against Animals And Inanimate Objects, Anna Pervukhin

ExpressO

Legal actions against non-humans (whether animals or objects) were once widespread. They were viewed seriously and undoubtedly served important social functions. This article considers the possibility that some of these actions may have been playful as well. Certain aspects of legal actions against animals and objects-- occasional moments of levity, a preoccupation with formal rules, and a strong emphasis on imaginative transformation-- suggest that these actions had elements of play. The possibility is worth considering for two reasons. First, it may shed some light on a practice that has perplexed and disturbed commentators for centuries. Second, an examination of play ...