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Articles 31 - 35 of 35

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Institutionalized Word Taboo: The Continuing Saga Of Fcc Indecency Regulation, Christopher M. Fairman Feb 2013

Institutionalized Word Taboo: The Continuing Saga Of Fcc Indecency Regulation, Christopher M. Fairman

Christopher M Fairman

Indecency regulation by the Federal Communication Commission and Supreme Court is the product of word taboo—the subconscious, emotional, involuntary avoidance of certain words out of fear that some harm will occur if they are spoken. Acting in tandem, the Court and the Commissioners create institutionalized word taboo based upon the assumption that broadcast media’s pervasive and intrusive presence into the home endangers unsupervised children. Technological innovation renders this premise invalid today, but institutionalized word taboo remains. This article (1) traces the rise of indecency regulation, (2) explains the invalidity of the assumptions used to justify it, (3) introduces ...


Copyright Freeconomics, John M. Newman Feb 2013

Copyright Freeconomics, John M. Newman

John M. Newman

Innovation has wreaked creative destruction on traditional content platforms. During the decade following Napster’s rise and fall, industry organizations launched litigation campaigns to combat the dramatic downward pricing pressure created by the advent of zero-price, copyright-infringing content. These campaigns attracted a torrent of debate, still ongoing, among scholars and stakeholders—but this debate has missed the forest for the trees. Industry organizations have abandoned litigation efforts, and many copyright owners now compete directly with infringing products by offering licit content at a price of $0.

This sea change has ushered in an era of “copyright freeconomics.” Drawing on an ...


Ownership Is Nine-Tenths Of Possession: How Disparate Conceptions Of Ownership Influence Possession Doctrines, Martin Hirschprung Feb 2013

Ownership Is Nine-Tenths Of Possession: How Disparate Conceptions Of Ownership Influence Possession Doctrines, Martin Hirschprung

martin hirschprung

Possession is nine-tenths of ownership. And yet, the concept of possession remains woefully unclear in the law, thereby rendering the very idea of ownership too somewhat murky. This Article argues that there exists a reflexive relationship between possession and ownership, and that one’s understanding of ownership and its incidents influence the very concept of possession, rather than vice-versa. The Article further argues that given this reality, the application of the concept of stewardship to question of possession can aid significantly in resolving some of the most important contemporary disputes regarding possession and ownership in society, such as disputes between ...


Caution — Contains Extremely Offensive Material: David Wojnarowicz V. American Family Association, The Visual Artists Rights Act, And A Proposal To Expand Fair Use To Include Artists' Moral Rights, Sarah Leggin Jan 2013

Caution — Contains Extremely Offensive Material: David Wojnarowicz V. American Family Association, The Visual Artists Rights Act, And A Proposal To Expand Fair Use To Include Artists' Moral Rights, Sarah Leggin

Sarah Leggin

Although many artists build their careers by offending or challenging mainstream culture and live happily as outsiders, these and all artists still strive to protect their reputations and the integrity of their works. The importance of protecting the moral rights of artists has long been recognized by European law, but the United States has not embraced the value of artists’ rights in the same way. Today, U.S. copyright law recognizes moral rights for visual works that fall within narrow categories due to the enactment of the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990 (VARA). Even after VARA was enacted and ...


It's Only A Day Away: Rethinking Copyright Termination In A New Era, Shane D. Valenzi Jan 2013

It's Only A Day Away: Rethinking Copyright Termination In A New Era, Shane D. Valenzi

Shane D Valenzi

January 1, 2013 will mark the beginning of an important shift in US Copyright Law. On that day, for the first time, authors who signed over their creative rights to a producer, publisher, or other “litigation-savvy” grantee under the current Copyright Act will begin to enter a window of time within which they may terminate those prior grants of rights and reclaim their original copyrights. Of course, such actions are unlikely to go unchallenged, as many of these works generate billions of dollars of revenue for their current owners. This Article will examine the “new-works termination” provision of the Copyright ...