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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

Gender Equity In College Athletics: Women Coaches As A Case Study, Deborah L. Rhode, Christopher J. Walker Feb 2007

Gender Equity In College Athletics: Women Coaches As A Case Study, Deborah L. Rhode, Christopher J. Walker

ExpressO

As Title IX celebrates its 35th anniversary, many have noted the positive impact it has had on women sports. But there is also an unintended (and oft-neglected) byproduct: as opportunities for female students have increased, opportunities for female professionals have declined. This Article focuses on the barriers that still confront women in college athletics, particularly those who seek professional positions in coaching and administration. Part I presents a brief overview of Title IX, which makes clear its limitations in securing gender equity. Part II.A discusses the declining representation and lower success rate of women coaches, while Part II.B ...


A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp Oct 2006

A Complete Property Right Amendment, John H. Ryskamp

ExpressO

The trend of the eminent domain reform and "Kelo plus" initiatives is toward a comprehensive Constitutional property right incorporating the elements of level of review, nature of government action, and extent of compensation. This article contains a draft amendment which reflects these concerns.


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Lucky: The Sequel, Martha Chamallas May 2005

Lucky: The Sequel, Martha Chamallas

The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law Working Paper Series

Lucky: The Sequel is a review essay based on Alice Sebold’s 1999 memoir Lucky in which Sebold describes her own rape as a college student, her experiences as a rape victim and her navigation of the legal system. Chamallas uses Sebold’s rape narrative to explore themes of particular interest to feminist legal scholars. She discusses the intersection of race and rape, the continuing controversy surrounding the categorization of rape as a crime of violence versus a sex crime and the usefulness of considering the social and cultural dimensions of the trauma of rape.


Revisiting Title Ix's Feminist Legacy: Moving Beyond The Three-Part Test, Deborah L. Brake Jan 2004

Revisiting Title Ix's Feminist Legacy: Moving Beyond The Three-Part Test, Deborah L. Brake

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

This essay addresses three issues surrounding Title IX’s application to women’s sports that have been largely eclipsed by the recent controversy over Title IX’s three-part test: the increasingly male composition of athletic leadership positions; the focus on cutting men’s sports as a remedy to discrimination against women; and the role of revenue and massive spending on men’s elite sports in justifying gender inequality in sports. The essay links each of these issues to broader questions and concerns in discrimination law more generally, and concludes that deeper cultural change is necessary to fulfill Title IX’s ...


The Secretary's Commission On Opportunity In Athletics Squandered Its Opportunity: Commercial College Sports And Why Title Ix Cannot Achieve Full Gender Equality Or Prevent The Elimination Of Minor Men's Teams, Suzanne Sangree Aug 2003

The Secretary's Commission On Opportunity In Athletics Squandered Its Opportunity: Commercial College Sports And Why Title Ix Cannot Achieve Full Gender Equality Or Prevent The Elimination Of Minor Men's Teams, Suzanne Sangree

ExpressO

The Department of Education recently announced that it would not revise the regulations which apply Title IX to athletics, thus rejecting the recommendations of its Commission on Opportunity in Athletics. The Commission’s recommendations would have drastically undercut Title IX’s efficacy and established a Bush Administration model for turning civil rights protections on their heads. Fortunately, the Administration heeded the public critique of the Commission’s recommendations and retreated from its previously stated intention to implement them. Instead, it reiterated its support for the principles of gender equality embodied in Title IX. We thus narrowly averted a civil rights ...