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Elementary Education and Teaching

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

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Full-Text Articles in Other Teacher Education and Professional Development

Reading: The Conferences, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch Sep 2015

Reading: The Conferences, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

The theme of this issue of Reading Horizons is exemplary practice, and as I recall, several of the sessions from the annual conference of the International Reading Association it becomes clear how central the concept of teacher as professional is to exemplary practice. One session in particular — Teacher Preparation and Staff Development: Lessons from New Zealand — presented by Debra Elliot and colleagues provided some food for thought in considering the teacher as professional. In discussing current models of student teaching, which is of course a critical component to the development of the teacher as professional, Stephanie Steffey from San Jose ...


Reviews: Professional Materials, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Sherry R. Myers, Paul Bright, Jeanne M. Jacobson Sep 2015

Reviews: Professional Materials, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Sherry R. Myers, Paul Bright, Jeanne M. Jacobson

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

Reviews of the following: Basic Reading Inventory (Jerry L. Johns) Merry Christmas, Amanda and April (Bonnie Pryor) Chicken Man (Michelle Edwards) All the Lights in the Night (Arthur A. Levine) Jack and the Beanstalk (Steven Kellogg) The Swineherd (Hans Christian Andersen) The Worst Person’s Christmas (James Stevenson) That’s Exactly the Way it Wasn’t (James Stevenson) An Auto Mechanic; A Carpenter; A Potter (Douglas Florian) Meredith’s Mother Takes the Train (Deborah Lee Rose)


Coaching For Metacognitive Instructional Practice, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch Sep 2015

Coaching For Metacognitive Instructional Practice, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

One way to identify students who are becoming accomplished readers and writers is to observe the degree to which the examples of coaching presented in this chapter are taken from my research as a participant in a statewide literacy professional development initiative: the Literacy Specialist Project (Kinnucan-Welsch, 2003a, 2003b; Rosemary, Grogan, et al., 2002). The central aim of the Literacy Specialist Project, launched in 2000 by the Ohio Department of Education, is to provide professional development to educators in the state of Ohio that supports enhanced understanding in the teaching of reading and writing. The professional development incorporates foundational knowledge ...


Conversation And The Development Of Learning Communities, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Patrick Jenlink Sep 2015

Conversation And The Development Of Learning Communities, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Patrick Jenlink

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

The process of designing social systems, including educational systems, is most likely to contribute to sustainable systems if the context for the design process is that of community. From a systems perspective, the people who serve the system and those who are served and affected by the system constitute the designing community (Banathy, 1996). The concept of design of professional learning communities for educators is particularly critical as we face the 21st century, given the historically dismal prospects for meaningful, substantive, professional development for teachers and other practitioners (Wilson & Berne, 1999). The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ...


Women Scholars, Integration, And The Marianist Tradition: Learning From Our Culture And Ourselves, Mary Ellen Seery, Shauna M. Adams, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Connie L. Bowman, Patricia R. Grogan, Laurice J. Joseph Sep 2015

Women Scholars, Integration, And The Marianist Tradition: Learning From Our Culture And Ourselves, Mary Ellen Seery, Shauna M. Adams, Kathryn Kinnucan-Welsch, Connie L. Bowman, Patricia R. Grogan, Laurice J. Joseph

Kathryn A. Kinnucan-Welsch

In the fall of 1997, a group of junior tenure-track women faculty in the Department of Teacher Education at the University of Dayton decided to meet regularly in order to support each other’s scholarly endeavors in the process of achieving promotion and tenure. The group of subsequently became known as the Writing-Writers’ Support Group (WWSG). In 2000, the group conducted a self-study of its group process to determine how the formation of women’s WWSG fit with the mission and characteristics of a Marianist university. The results suggest that, although each of the characteristics could be identified in the ...