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Canning Jars And Patterns Of Canning Behavior: A Study Of Households On The Hector Backbone, New York. 1850-1940, Jayne Ann Michaels Aug 2015

Canning Jars And Patterns Of Canning Behavior: A Study Of Households On The Hector Backbone, New York. 1850-1940, Jayne Ann Michaels

Master's Theses

Typically, late 19th or early 20th century domestic sites contain fragments of a common item: canning jars. Such is the case regarding 21 sites along the Hector Backbone in New York State. These sites, investigated by the Finger Lakes National Forest Farmstead Archaeology Project, produced a rich sample of over 250,000 artifacts and thousands related to canning.

The objective of this thesis is to explore the potential of these common artifacts to yield important information about these Backbone households. Specifically, my questions include: when did these households adopt canning and who were they?

The intentional decision to ...


Careers In Aging: Increasing Interest And Investigating Career Paths, Paul Cunnington May 2015

Careers In Aging: Increasing Interest And Investigating Career Paths, Paul Cunnington

Master's Theses

This qualitative study explored the perspective of young professionals on how to increase interest in choosing a career in the field of aging and how their own career path led to their current employment in the field of aging. Fifteen professionals in the field of aging, ranging in age from 23 to 34, participated in semi-­‐structured interviews. Data were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Results confirmed prior research that professionals working in the field of aging come from a variety of disciplines. Participants noted attractive aspects of a career in the field of aging, including flexibility and mobility. To ...


The Allocation Of Time And Goods: Three Essays On American Household Shopping Behavior, Jing Cai Dec 2010

The Allocation Of Time And Goods: Three Essays On American Household Shopping Behavior, Jing Cai

Dissertations

Consumers’ shopping behavior connects market goods expenditure with the out of- market time allocation in their daily time use. This study is composed of three essays. In the first essay, data are collected from the American Time Use Survey and it is found that an individual’s time devoted to shopping is positively determined by opportunity cost of time. Grocery shopping and other shopping, as two distinct types of shopping, react differently to a series of individual and household characteristics as well as by seasons. The corresponding marginal effects also differentiate between shopping time, leisure time, and home production time ...


The Effects Of Immediacy To Parenthood On The Perceptions Of Importance Of Parent Education Topics, Nancy Mauro Gerard Aug 1984

The Effects Of Immediacy To Parenthood On The Perceptions Of Importance Of Parent Education Topics, Nancy Mauro Gerard

Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to determine how immediacy to parenthood affects one's perception of what should be learned in a parent education class. Differences were sought among groups of individuals at four levels of immediacy to parenthood on the perceived importance of 11 parenting topics. These topics were Pregnancy and Childbirth, Infancy, Early Childhood, Late Childhood, Adolescence, Health and Safety, Social Issues Related to Parenthood, Family Relations and Communication, Guiding the Behavior of Children, Parenting Patterns, and Career-Related Concerns. In order to determine if there were differences, the data, collected through the use of a parent education ...


A Study Of Aging In An Old Order Amish Mennonite Community, Louise Chahbazi Jan 1962

A Study Of Aging In An Old Order Amish Mennonite Community, Louise Chahbazi

Master's Theses

Introduction

The Old Order Amish Mennonites, undoubtedly the plainest of the "plain people," have a high regard for the beliefs and customs of their forebears. Their forefathers had no telephones, automobiles, electric lights, radios, or church buildings, so the Amish of today work the land with horses, travel in buggies, burn gas lights, gather in homes for worship services, and wear styles of dress which were common in seventeenth and eighteenth century Europe.

Estimates made on the basis of recorded church membership in the Mennonite Yearbook place the Amish population of the United States at approximately 57,000. Their high ...