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Gender Equity in Education Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Gender Equity in Education

Slis Student Research Journal, Vol. 9, Iss. 1 Jun 2019

Slis Student Research Journal, Vol. 9, Iss. 1

School of Information Student Research Journal

No abstract provided.


The More You Know, The More You Owe, Megan Price Jun 2019

The More You Know, The More You Owe, Megan Price

School of Information Student Research Journal

No abstract provided.


Finding Aid To The Collection Of Mary Low Carver Materials, Mary Low Carver, Colby College Special Collections Jan 2018

Finding Aid To The Collection Of Mary Low Carver Materials, Mary Low Carver, Colby College Special Collections

Finding Aids

Mary Caffrey Low (later Carver), born on March 22, 1850, in Waterville, Maine, was the first woman to graduate from Colby College. In 1871, she enrolled as the college's first female student, to graduate four years later in 1875. She was one of the first women in New England to receive a regular A.B. degree. Low was the only female student at Colby until the fall of 1873, when she was joined by four other women, among them Louise Helen Coburn. In 1874, Low co-founded the Sigma Kappa Sorority. Low was the first woman to appear on the ...


Collections Decoded, Ala Annual Conference 2017, Aisha Conner-Gaten, Tracy Drake, Kristyn Caragher May 2017

Collections Decoded, Ala Annual Conference 2017, Aisha Conner-Gaten, Tracy Drake, Kristyn Caragher

Aisha Conner-Gaten

How are collections processed and presented in regards to race and ethnicity? What is not collected and why? Who gets to say what is worth collecting? Operating from three distinct but interlocking perspectives, we will facilitate a discussion about navigating collection development and collection development policies while centering marginalized voices. The discussion will include practical strategies for developing anti-racist collection development practices and how anti-racist accomplices can both support and follow the lead of Black women librarians and archivists.