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Full-Text Articles in Community College Leadership

Remedial/Developmental Education And The Cost Of Community College Transfer: A Los Angeles County Sample, Tatiana Melguizo, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Scott Cypers Dec 2007

Remedial/Developmental Education And The Cost Of Community College Transfer: A Los Angeles County Sample, Tatiana Melguizo, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Scott Cypers

Linda Serra Hagedorn

This study calculates and explores the total costs of a community college education prior to transfer to a four-year college. Included are all courses both at and below the college level by 411 students who attended one of the nine community colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) and who successfully transferred to a four-year institution. The main finding is that students with deep developmental needs averaged five years at the community college before transferring, and transferred only one year's worth of college-level courses. Of concern is the great number of African American and Latino students in ...


Transitions Within The Community College: Pathways To Access And Inclusion., Linda S. Hagedorn, George M. Prather Dec 2005

Transitions Within The Community College: Pathways To Access And Inclusion., Linda S. Hagedorn, George M. Prather

Linda Serra Hagedorn

Community colleges are often criticized for the low numbers of students who ostensibly appear successful. This article takes a unique look a the pathways many community college students take and redefines success as transition. Using the full population of the Los Angeles Community College District, this article examines the intra-institutional transitions of 1) remedial to college level, 2) English as a second language to traditional college courses, and 3) lower to higher academic goals. Analyses revealed that: 1) those students at the lowest levels of developmental English and Math were much less likely to transition than those who began their ...


Transcript Analyses As A Tool To Understand Community College Student Academic Behaviors., Linda S. Hagedorn Dec 2004

Transcript Analyses As A Tool To Understand Community College Student Academic Behaviors., Linda S. Hagedorn

Linda Serra Hagedorn

Community colleges are truly an American invention that, despite many documented successes, remains controversial. There is a large body of research that criticizes these institutions citing non-successes (Dougherty, 1987, 1994; Brint & Karabel, 1989). Debates whirl not only about the overall outcomes of these institutions, but also about how to measure community college student progress and outcomes. This article specifically promotes the utilization of transcript analysis to document and understand the complex academic behaviors of community college students. Transcripts or the records of student activities that include enrollments, course drops, and grades are important, yet ignored documents that tell the stories ...


The Academic And Occupational Outcomes Of Private Residential High School Student Instruction, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Hye Sun Moon, Shawn M. Kanaiaupuni, Katherine A. Tibbetts Dec 2004

The Academic And Occupational Outcomes Of Private Residential High School Student Instruction, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Hye Sun Moon, Shawn M. Kanaiaupuni, Katherine A. Tibbetts

Linda Serra Hagedorn

Using a population of graduates from a large high school with both residential and commuter students serving specifically students with Native Hawaiian ancestry, the study compares outcomes such as high school graduation, college attendance, college graduation, occupational status, and overall life happiness to determine the effects of residential status. Results indicated that the strongest variable that separated the college completers from the non-completers was receipt of college financial aid. Other important variables included Hawaiian culture, locus of control, family predominance of standard English, and beginning college at a community college


Research On Urban Community College Transfer And Retention: The Los Angeles Truccs Project, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Bill Maxwell Dec 2001

Research On Urban Community College Transfer And Retention: The Los Angeles Truccs Project, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Bill Maxwell

Linda Serra Hagedorn

This is a report on the Los Angeles Transfer and Retention of Urban Community College Students (TRUCCS) Project, which tracks approximately 5,000 community college students from nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in order to gather information on retention and persistence. The project also investigates urban community college student patterns of reverse transfer, remediation, and social integration. The report indicates that the student ethnic and age diversity in the TRUCCS project reflects the total ethnic and age diversity of the Los Angeles Community College District, with Hispanic and African-American students representing a majority of the total ...


Unite For Success: Creating Business And Community College Partnerships For Economic Development, Linda Serra Hagedorn Mar 2001

Unite For Success: Creating Business And Community College Partnerships For Economic Development, Linda Serra Hagedorn

Linda Serra Hagedorn

While community colleges have historically been a source of training for many people, the latest trend is a drift from their vocational focus to one of a more scholarly focus: transfer to four-year institutions. At the same time, business and industry are demanding more highly-trained workers as many employment opportunities remain open due to a lack of appropriately trained individuals. This white paper posits a confluence of the missions and needs of community colleges and local businesses and describes scenarios where long-term united efforts will assist local residents to engage the jobs and opportunities in Los Angeles and to strengthen ...


Final Report Of The Community College Chancellor And Presidential Seminar, June 30 2000, Linda Serra Hagedorn Aug 2000

Final Report Of The Community College Chancellor And Presidential Seminar, June 30 2000, Linda Serra Hagedorn

Linda Serra Hagedorn

As part of the Higher Education for a New Century Conference held at the University of Southern California, we convened an invited one-day seminar for community college presidents and chancellors. The invitation list included the chancellors from Los Angeles and Orange County as well as all of the campus presidents from Los Angeles, Orange County, and San Bernardino County. The purpose of the day was to discuss the future of community colleges in southern California and to share ideas, concerns, and best practices. The following provides the minutes and conclusions from the one-day seminar attended by 18 Southern California Community ...


Does Community College Versus Four-Year College Attendance Influence Students' Educational Plans?, Ernest T. Pascarella, Marcia Edison, Amaury Nora, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Patrick T. Terenzini Feb 1998

Does Community College Versus Four-Year College Attendance Influence Students' Educational Plans?, Ernest T. Pascarella, Marcia Edison, Amaury Nora, Linda Serra Hagedorn, Patrick T. Terenzini

Linda Serra Hagedorn

In this study researchers tested the hypothesis that community college attendance lowers students' precollege plans to obtain a bachelor of arts degree. In the presence of controls for precollege plans, other background factors, and college academic and nonacademic experiences, community college students initially planning to obtain a bachelor of arts degree were between 20% and 31% more likely than similar four-year college students to lower their plans below a bachelor of arts degree by the end of the second year of college.


Cognitive Effects Of Community Colleges And Four-Year Colleges: Further Evidence From The National Study Of Student Learning., Ernest Pascarella, Marcia Edison, Amaury Nora, Linda S. Hagedorn, Patrick Terenzini Nov 1995

Cognitive Effects Of Community Colleges And Four-Year Colleges: Further Evidence From The National Study Of Student Learning., Ernest Pascarella, Marcia Edison, Amaury Nora, Linda S. Hagedorn, Patrick Terenzini

Linda Serra Hagedorn

The two-year community college has become one of the major institutional configurations in the American postsecondary system. It has undoubtedly increased both the access to higher education and the social mobility of numerous individuals whose education world otherwise have ended with high school (Cohen & Brawer, 1989; Nunley & Breneman, 1988). However, critiques of the community college posit that, although it may largely guarantee equality of opportunity for access to higher education, it has not, in relationship to four-year colleges and universities, provided equal opportunity in terms of the outcomes or benefits of higher education (Brint & Karabel, 1989; Grubb, 1984; Karabel, 1986).