Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Community College Leadership Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Community College Leadership

Using Positive Psychology To Bolster Student Success At Gateway Community College, Erik Otto Driessen, Adam Burgoon, Devon Tomasulo, Esther Chewning Apr 2018

Using Positive Psychology To Bolster Student Success At Gateway Community College, Erik Otto Driessen, Adam Burgoon, Devon Tomasulo, Esther Chewning

Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) Service Learning Projects

Supported by a situational analysis and review of positive psychological literature, this paper outlines an application plan to support GateWay Community College’s ‘experiential learning with a purpose' vision which focuses on infusing meaning into students’ career development and learning. This vision was articulated by Kerry Sanderson, Director of Career Services, and Jessica Brosilo, Service Learning Center Coordinator, in the form of three guiding principles for our work: 1) accessing large student populations, 2) developing students' personal meaning and understanding of purpose through career goals, and 3) cultivating a broader view of success beyond career goals. Future-mindedness and self-efficacy emerged ...


Institutional Governance For A Shared Glocal Engagement Mission, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2017

Institutional Governance For A Shared Glocal Engagement Mission, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Governing bodies can and should play essential roles in advancing a glocal agenda. Governance is essential because glocal work is strategic, includes an accountability dimension and relies on the talents and perspectives governance participants can bring to the university. Boards should leverage their traditional oversight and accountability functions and their strategic work. However, to be most useful in this work, boards should also add a leadership function, in which they make sense of a dynamic environment and raise key issues for the university to address.


A Failing Safety Net: Declining Community College Affordability, Ben Williams, Joni E. Finney, Sarah Torres Dec 2016

A Failing Safety Net: Declining Community College Affordability, Ben Williams, Joni E. Finney, Sarah Torres

GSE Publications

The nation’s community colleges serve as the educational safety net for millions of students. While the safety net is showing signs of wear, it can be restored within current state and federal policies guiding higher education. Bipartisan support can and should be developed for this agenda because it cuts across the desire within both major political parties to create opportunities for those left behind.


What Presidents Really Think About Their Boards, Peter D. Eckel Nov 2013

What Presidents Really Think About Their Boards, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Takeaways

Contrary to many recent headlines of tensions between presidents and boards, the clear majority of presidents report that their boards have a positive impact on the institution, they are satisfied overall with the baord, and they think boards are engaged at the right levels.

Understanding higher education better may help to increase board engagement...as well as micromanaging if boards, board leaders, and presidents don't have ongoing conversations about the appropriate role of the board.

Presidents and boards must work together to get governance right. Such goals require effort, intentionality, and candor.


The Last 100 Days Of A Presidency: What Boards Need To Know And Do, Sandra S. Johnson, Peter D. Eckel May 2013

The Last 100 Days Of A Presidency: What Boards Need To Know And Do, Sandra S. Johnson, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Takeaways

It is just as important for a board to plan the transition of the outgoing president as it is to plan the transition of the incoming president.

Boards should help departing presidents fashion a to-do list, as well as a not-to-do list.

Boards should recognize that the departure of the president can present significant procedural and emotional issues for senior staff members awaiting the arrival of the new president.


Prescriptions For Change: Can Ideas From Health Care Cure Higher Education's Ills?, Peter D. Eckel Jul 2012

Prescriptions For Change: Can Ideas From Health Care Cure Higher Education's Ills?, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Takeaways

Higher education shares some important characteristics with the health-care sector. Both are dominated by large cadres of highly educated staff, have complex bottom lines, are market-driven and strongly influenced by public policy, and are made up of value-driven organizations.

Health care appears to be one or two decades ahead of higher education in its transformation into an industry that is more outcomes-based, cost- and price-sensitive, and responsive to customer needs.

Some of the insights that higher education can gain from health care include: Flawed systems generate flawed results; the focus should be on needs, costs, and undervalued services; wisdom ...


Presidents Leading: The Dynamics And Complexities Of Campus Leadership, Peter D. Eckel, Adrianna Kezar Jan 2011

Presidents Leading: The Dynamics And Complexities Of Campus Leadership, Peter D. Eckel, Adrianna Kezar

GSE Publications

While the work of academics—teaching, research, and service—is the core of an institution, they need someone who can attend to the following:

1. Manage their finances and budgets and provide key services, such as payroll, and health and retirement benefits

2. Serve as a go-between to the scholars from different disciplines and coordinate individual course offerings to create a coherent curriculum

3. Act as a conduit to outside councils, government agencies, alumni, donors, and communities when representing, as well as defending, the academics

4. Steward, but more importantly increase, the available financial resources

5. Oversee facilities and ensure ...


Closing Academic Programs: Pitfalls And Possibilities, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2010

Closing Academic Programs: Pitfalls And Possibilities, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Takeaways

1 Closures of academic programs can have lasting negative fallout and the savings may not be as great as anticipated, but at certain points—and if done well—closures can provide an opportunity to refocus the institution.

2 While campus leaders typically are the primary drivers of the initial decisions to close programs and to craft the processes of doing so, boards of trustees have important roles to fulfill that can advance the efforts.

3 The current economic uncertainties may have shortened the time it takes for some campuses to recognize that the only way forward is to close ...


Redefining Competition Constructively: The Challenges Of Privatisation, Competition And Market-Based State Policy In The United States, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2007

Redefining Competition Constructively: The Challenges Of Privatisation, Competition And Market-Based State Policy In The United States, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

In the United States, the relationship between state governments and public colleges and universities is being redefined with new notions of autonomy and accountability, and with funding policies that are highly market-driven (often referred to as "privatisation") as the centerpieces. Situations and institutional strategies unthinkable only a few years ago are becoming increasingly commonplace. For instance, a few business and law schools at public institutions are moving toward privatisation, distancing themselves from both the states and their parent universities.

While American higher education has traditionally been competitive and market driven, emerging state market-based policies, which will clearly benefit some types ...


The Dilemma Of Presidential Leadership, Robert Birnbaum, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2005

The Dilemma Of Presidential Leadership, Robert Birnbaum, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Every decade, about five thousand persons serve as college or university presidents. Over a term of office averaging less than seven years, the president is expected to serve simultaneously as the chief administrator of a large and complex bureaucracy, as the convening colleague of a professional community, as a symbolic elder in a campus culture of shared values and symbols, and (in some institutions) as a public official accountable to a public board and responsive to the demands of other governmental agencies. Balancing the conflicting expectations of these roles has always been difficult; changing demographic trends, fiscal constraints, the complexity ...


Counsel On Program Elimination, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2003

Counsel On Program Elimination, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

This book has provided case illustrations and discussed the costs and savings of program elimination, the role of leadership, the ability of shared governance to make hard decisions, and the use of criteria. The concluding chapter brings together the findings to provide counsel on program elimination. It presents rationale for why decisions must be defensible; discusses the tradeoffs regarding savings, tenure, and program elimination; and makes suggestions both for campus leaders seeking to eliminate programs and for those seeking to fight off program closures. Additionally, it suggests empirically based modifications to the Association of American University Professors (AAUP) policies concerning ...


Navigating The Currents Of Change, Barbara Hill, Madeleine Green, Peter D. Eckel Jan 2001

Navigating The Currents Of Change, Barbara Hill, Madeleine Green, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Colleges and universities are constantly undergoing change of some sort. Each new academic year brings computer software upgrades, fresh scheduling issues, new courses, and an influx of faculty and staff members.

But some institutional change is more ambitious, penetrating into the fabric of the institution. Many call this change "transformational"—meaning that it affects culture, structures, policies, attitudes, and behaviors.


Learning For Organizing: Institutional Reading Groups As A Strategy For Change, Peter D. Eckel, Adrianna Kezar, Devorah Lieberman Nov 1999

Learning For Organizing: Institutional Reading Groups As A Strategy For Change, Peter D. Eckel, Adrianna Kezar, Devorah Lieberman

GSE Publications

Organizing for learning is an important emphasis for AAHE, and rightly so. Colleges and universities should make institutional changes that promote better and more effective learning. Our experiences — from a national perspective at the American Council on Education (ACE) and ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education and from a campus-based perspective at Portland State University — suggest that before institutions can organize for learning, they must first learn for organizing.


Core Values And The Road To Change, Madeleine F. Green, Peter D. Eckel, Barbara Hill Jul 1998

Core Values And The Road To Change, Madeleine F. Green, Peter D. Eckel, Barbara Hill

GSE Publications

Higher education draws much of the vocabulary and many of the concepts about change from the corporate sector. Corporations "downsized" and "restructured" in the early 1990s in response to competitive and financial pressures; higher education currently is experiencing similar pressures. Yet change and renewal in higher education are not just about money and becoming more cost-effective. Although these are important objectives, higher education must incorporate changes that improve student learning, foster closer connections with their communities, and adapt to the demands of an increasingly technological society. Reorganizing and cutting costs alone do not suggest how colleges and universities might become ...


Are They Singing From The Same Hymn Book?, Peter D. Eckel Jan 1998

Are They Singing From The Same Hymn Book?, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

A fact of academic life is that faculty and presidents primarily concern themselves with different institutional tasks, attend different institutional meetings, and pursue different institutional goals. In short, faculty do "faculty things" and presidents do "presidential things." They have different perceptions of institutional life (Peterson and White 1992). Differing perspectives can easily lead to standoffs between the two powers in academe—those who teach and those who administer—and those standoffs happen quite frequently (American Council on Education & Pew Higher Education Roundtable 1996; Schuster et al. 1994). Faculty-administrator differences are not a new phenomenon; examples exist at Williams and Dartmouth Colleges from 100 years ago ...