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2013

Occupy Movement

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Art Education

Anonymous: The Occupy Movement And The Failure Of Representational Democracy, Jan Jagodzinski Jan 2013

Anonymous: The Occupy Movement And The Failure Of Representational Democracy, Jan Jagodzinski

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

In this essay I try to make the case that the Occupy Movement can be thought through as a Post-Situationist art event which requires that it be thought of in terms of its pragmatic effects and what it can ‘do’ in relation to its viral spreading around major urban centers of the globe. I further try to make my case by utilizing the conceptual tool kit of Deleuze and Guattari; hence such ideas as sense-event, territory, virtual, and actual are part of this repertoire. I then try to further the complexity of Post-Situationism by including hacktivism and exploring the importance ...


Poetic Occupations: Artists As Narrator-Protagonists, Jack Richardson Jan 2013

Poetic Occupations: Artists As Narrator-Protagonists, Jack Richardson

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

What does it mean to “occupy” space? Referencing the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) protests of 2011, this paper articulates a type of public art practice that can be understood as poetic occupation. The paper further suggests that shifting one’s understanding of public art practice provokes a reconsideration of the role of the artist. To this end, Miwon Kwon’s (2002) term “narrator-protagonist” is useful for expressing this alternative role. The paper proceeds with an exploration of the work of the artist collective Lone Twin, supported by Michel de Certeau’s (1984) theories associating walking with speaking, and illustrated with ...


This Is What Democracy Looks Like: Art And The Wisconsin Uprising, Kim Cosier Jan 2013

This Is What Democracy Looks Like: Art And The Wisconsin Uprising, Kim Cosier

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

In February of 2011, an enormous popular political movement came to life in Wisconsin. For many people who were engaged in the month-long occupation of the Capitol in Madison, the Wisconsin Uprising was their first experience with direct political action. For the artists who are the focus of this article, taking part in the Wisconsin Uprising seemed like a natural outgrowth of their many years of socially engaged artmaking. In this article, I offer a brief overview of the Wisconsin Uprising followed by a discussion of the contributions of the artists in the protests in the context of their larger ...