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Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet Mar 2018

Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet

Victor Fet

No abstract provided.


Verses And Versions, Victor Fet Nov 2017

Verses And Versions, Victor Fet

Victor Fet

A review of the book: Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry Selected and Translated by Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Brian Boyd & Stanislav Shvabrin. Harcourt, 2008, 441 pp.

Резюме:

рецензия на книгу набоковских стихотворных переводов, Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry Selected and Translated by Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Brian Boyd & Stanislav Shvabrin. Harcourt, 2008, 441 pp.


Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet Sep 2017

Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet

Victor Fet

I discuss silverfish, of Lepisma—a strange insect that crawls through many of Nabokov’s pages.


Beheading First: On Nabokov's Translation Of Lewis Carroll, Victor Fet Sep 2017

Beheading First: On Nabokov's Translation Of Lewis Carroll, Victor Fet

Victor Fet

Anya v Strane chudes, young Nabokov’s 1923 Russian translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, contains an intentionally shifted statement “beheading first, sentence later” compared to Lewis Carroll’s “sentence first, verdict later”. The shift is fitting for the 1920s children émigré audience.


An Anti-Locust Campaign In Nabokov (And Pushkin), Victor Fet Sep 2017

An Anti-Locust Campaign In Nabokov (And Pushkin), Victor Fet

Victor Fet

Pushkin’s non-apocryphal anti-locust campaign is reflected in Nabokov’s unpublished sequel to The Gift.


Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet Jan 2016

Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

No abstract provided.


A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers Dec 2015

A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "A Theory of Genre Formation in the Twentieth Century" Michael Rodgers explores the relationship between Vladimir Nabokov's Invitation to a Beheading and magical realism in order to theorize about genre formation in the twentieth century. Rodgers argues not only that specific twentieth-century narrative forms are bound intrinsically with literary realism and socio-political conditions, but also that these factors can produce formal commonalities.


Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet Oct 2014

Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

I discuss silverfish, of Lepisma—a strange insect that crawls through many of Nabokov’s pages.


Eugene Onegin The Cold War Monument: How Edmund Wilson Quarreled With Vladimir Nabokov, Tim Conley Jan 2014

Eugene Onegin The Cold War Monument: How Edmund Wilson Quarreled With Vladimir Nabokov, Tim Conley

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

The tale of how Edmund Wilson quarreled with Vladimir Nabokov over the latter’s 1964 translation of Eugene Onegin can be instructively read as a politically charged event, specifically a “high culture” allegory of the Cold War. Dissemination of anti-Communist ideals (often in liberal and literary guises) was the mandate of the Congress for Cultural Freedom, whose funding and editorial initiatives included the publication of both pre-Revolution Russian literature and, more notoriously, the journal Encounter (1953-1990), where Nabokov’s fiery “Reply” to Wilson appeared. This essay outlines the propaganda value of the Onegin debate within and to Cold War mythology.


And Then, He Folds His Patterned Rug: Repressive Reality And The Eternal Soul In Vladimir Nabokov, Elizabeth Cook Apr 2012

And Then, He Folds His Patterned Rug: Repressive Reality And The Eternal Soul In Vladimir Nabokov, Elizabeth Cook

Masters Theses

While Vladimir Nabokov has deservedly earned fame as a stylist of the strange, most critics who study his novels approach his absurd and beautiful characters as little more than fractured victims of a wholly subjective reality. Compounding the misunderstanding is the tired debate over whether or not Lolita is literary, pornographic, or some cruel game of cat-and-mouse in which Nabokov seizes control of his readers' sense of morality. However, critics who read Nabokov as nothing more than a manipulative stylist neglect to realize that his characters suffer such absurd distortions of spirit and mind because their environment--the "average" reality of ...


Beheading First: On Nabokov's Translation Of Lewis Carroll, Victor Fet Jan 2009

Beheading First: On Nabokov's Translation Of Lewis Carroll, Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

Anya v Strane chudes, young Nabokov’s 1923 Russian translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, contains an intentionally shifted statement “beheading first, sentence later” compared to Lewis Carroll’s “sentence first, verdict later”. The shift is fitting for the 1920s children émigré audience.


Verses And Versions, Victor Fet Jan 2009

Verses And Versions, Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

A review of the book: Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry Selected and Translated by Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Brian Boyd & Stanislav Shvabrin. Harcourt, 2008, 441 pp.

Резюме:

рецензия на книгу набоковских стихотворных переводов, Verses and Versions: Three Centuries of Russian Poetry Selected and Translated by Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Brian Boyd & Stanislav Shvabrin. Harcourt, 2008, 441 pp.


An Anti-Locust Campaign In Nabokov (And Pushkin), Victor Fet Jan 2005

An Anti-Locust Campaign In Nabokov (And Pushkin), Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

Pushkin’s non-apocryphal anti-locust campaign is reflected in Nabokov’s unpublished sequel to The Gift.


Nabokov, Dostoevski, Proust: Despair , Timothy L. Parrish Jun 2004

Nabokov, Dostoevski, Proust: Despair , Timothy L. Parrish

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Although Nabokov criticism has long identified Despair with Dostoevski, critics have for the most part addressed Despair in terms of how it either attacks or validates Dostoevski and thus have understood Nabokov to be speaking primarily about Dostoevski's achievement as a novelist. As I argue, Despair revises Dostoevski as a sly assertion of Nabokov's paradoxical aesthetic independence, and does so through the medium of Marcel Proust. It predicts the more obvious Proustian influence that critics have noticed in Nabokov's later works. In Despair Proust gives Nabokov the fundamental modernist narrative that makes an artist's coming to ...


Nabokov's "Torpid Smoke", Leona Toker Jun 1988

Nabokov's "Torpid Smoke", Leona Toker

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Nabokov's short stories are polished self-contained works of art. However, like his novels and poems, they can be profitably read in the light of their place in his general canon. This place is determined by the time when each story was written and by the way in which other works enrich and elucidate the significance of its images.

The short fiction of Nabokov's Berlin period has been regarded largely as akin to studies that a painter makes in preparation for a big picture. In some cases, however, the stories seem to serve as safety valves for the urgent ...


Nabokov's Amphiphorical Gestures , S. E. Sweeney Jan 1987

Nabokov's Amphiphorical Gestures , S. E. Sweeney

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

In addition to using two primary kinds of metaphors (those that clarify descriptions, and those that develop into leitmotifs), Nabokov's fiction demonstrates a third kind that is characterized by extended analogies, baroque, seemingly uncontrolled imagery and rhetoric, and, most importantly, fundamental ambiguity. Although this inherent ambiguity is developed throughout the comparison, it is never resolved. Because of this distinguishing characteristic, I have named such metaphors "amphiphors," after one of Nabokov's own neologisms. Nabokov's comments in Nikolai Gogol and Lectures on Russian Literature, as well as direct allusions to Gogol embedded in a few amphiphors, suggest that this ...


Practicing Nostalgia: Time And Memory In Nabokov's Early Russian Fiction , Philip Sicker Jan 1987

Practicing Nostalgia: Time And Memory In Nabokov's Early Russian Fiction , Philip Sicker

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Nabokov's earliest Russian fiction reveals his lifelong preoccupation with time and his complex strategies for preserving heightened moments of experience. Dissatisfied with the brevity of involuntary (Proustian) recall, his émigré protagonists strive to inhabit their Russian past more fully through a painstaking process of aesthetic re-creation. Beginning with a handful of vivid recollections, the hero of Mary gradually fabricates a past that is more intensely real than the original. Nabokov's most mature characters, however, recognize the solipsistic danger and utility of living in a vanished mental paradise. Turning to the present, they find unexpected beauty in the arrangement ...


Inverted Reality In Nabokov's Look At The Harlequins!, D. Barton Johnson Jan 1984

Inverted Reality In Nabokov's Look At The Harlequins!, D. Barton Johnson

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Look at the Harlequins! presents itself as the autobiography of a famed Anglo-Russian writer who suffers from bouts of insanity that are connected with his feeling that he is the inferior copy of another, much better writer. The autobiography is devoted mainly to his four great loves and to his books. Close analysis suggests that the narrator's account is false and is essentially a record of his delusive life during periods of insanity. LATH is seen as an example of those of Nabokov's novels that have schizoid narrators, such as The Eye, Despair, and Pale Fire, and is ...