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2014

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Articles 1 - 30 of 53

Full-Text Articles in Slavic Languages and Societies

The Wolf Attacks: A History Of The Russo-Chechen Conflict, Christina E. Baxter Dec 2014

The Wolf Attacks: A History Of The Russo-Chechen Conflict, Christina E. Baxter

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In the 1990s and early 2000s, the Chechens fought against the Russians for independence. The focus in the literature available has been on the wars and the atrocities caused by the wars. The literature then hypothesizes that the insurgency of today is just a continuation of the past. They do not focus on a major event in Chechen history: the Soviet liquidation of the Chechen-Ingush Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic in 1944. It is this author’s assertion that the liquidation of the Chechen-Ingush ASSR forever changed the mindset of the people because it fractured a society that was once unified ...


Double Consciousness, Scott Abbott Nov 2014

Double Consciousness, Scott Abbott

Scott Abbott

David Albahari's two books newly available in English translations (Yale UP and Dalkey Archive) both portray emigrants from the former Yugoslavia in terms of identity flux, a condition that might be called "double consciousness."


Is Russia A Block Of Ice Floating Back Into The 16th Century, Marko Dumančić Nov 2014

Is Russia A Block Of Ice Floating Back Into The 16th Century, Marko Dumančić

History Faculty Publications

Editorial published in The Moscow Times and The Huffington Post


Is Russia A Block Of Ice Floating Back Into The 16th Century, Marko Dumancic Oct 2014

Is Russia A Block Of Ice Floating Back Into The 16th Century, Marko Dumancic

Marko Dumančić

Editorial published in The Moscow Times and The Huffington Post


Faith, Doubt, And Chiasmus In Krzysztof Kieslowski's Decalogue I, William Bartley Oct 2014

Faith, Doubt, And Chiasmus In Krzysztof Kieslowski's Decalogue I, William Bartley

Journal of Religion & Film

This article proposes a reinterpretation of Krzysztof Kieslowski’s exploration of the first commandment in Decalogue I. It argues that the narrative structure of the story is chiastic—i.e., inversely parallel—which follows from recognizing for the first time the crucial role that Irena, the devoutly Catholic sister of Krzysztof, a professor and religious skeptic, plays in the story. The pattern of inverse parallelism (chiasmus) emerges as Krzysztof and Irena respond separately to the tragic death of Krzysztof’s son, Pawel: as Krzysztof’s skepticism gives way to a new faith in God, inversely and unexpectedly Irena’s faith ...


Baba Yaga: The Wild Witch Of The East In Russian Fairy Tales, Sibelan Forrester, Helena Goscilo, And Martin Skoro, Eds. & The Russian Folktale By Vladimir Yakovlevich Propp (Review), Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby Oct 2014

Baba Yaga: The Wild Witch Of The East In Russian Fairy Tales, Sibelan Forrester, Helena Goscilo, And Martin Skoro, Eds. & The Russian Folktale By Vladimir Yakovlevich Propp (Review), Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby

Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet Oct 2014

Nabokov's Silverfish, Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

I discuss silverfish, of Lepisma—a strange insect that crawls through many of Nabokov’s pages.


Invited Talk: Suspending The Bomb: War And Peace In Russian Protest Art, Julia Chadaga Sep 2014

Invited Talk: Suspending The Bomb: War And Peace In Russian Protest Art, Julia Chadaga

Julia Bekman Chadaga

No abstract provided.


The Rainbow Edges: The Legacy Of Communist Mass Housing And The Colorful Future Of Czech Cities, Kimberly E. Zarecor Sep 2014

The Rainbow Edges: The Legacy Of Communist Mass Housing And The Colorful Future Of Czech Cities, Kimberly E. Zarecor

Kimberly E. Zarecor

Almost twenty years after the end of Communism in Czechoslovakia, more than 30% of the inhabitants of the Czech Republic still live in structural panel buildings—the anonymous concrete apartment blocks that occupy the edges of teh country's towns and cities. In these fully prefabricated buildings, constructed by the thousands from the mid-1950s until the end of the 1980s, every wall, floor, and ceiling panel is structural. Massive stair towers provide additional stability in the absence of structural skeletons. The first post-Communist president, Vaclav Havel, famously referred to them as 'rabbit warrens' since the interiors are a series of ...


Infrastructural Thinking: Urban Housing In Former Czechoslovakia From The Stalin Era To Eu Accession, Kimberly E. Zarecor Sep 2014

Infrastructural Thinking: Urban Housing In Former Czechoslovakia From The Stalin Era To Eu Accession, Kimberly E. Zarecor

Kimberly E. Zarecor

In contemporary conversations about urban housing, the cities of the former Eastern Bloc rarely come to mind as potential models for future development. Images persist of vast, grey, treeless expanses of space occupied by repetitive apartment blocks that dwarf their human inhabitants. This view does capture something about the experience of living in what came to be known as the “socialist city,” yet the cities had many other kinds of spaces—older urban fabric, small apartment blocks, green spaces, village remnants, and neighborhood shopping corridors. Often the existing and the new were integrated into a synthetic whole. The ambitious master ...


Bigness Of Another Sort: The Challenge Of A Mass Housing Inventory In The Czech Republic, Kimberly E. Zarecor Sep 2014

Bigness Of Another Sort: The Challenge Of A Mass Housing Inventory In The Czech Republic, Kimberly E. Zarecor

Kimberly E. Zarecor

No abstract provided.


Marriage In The Short Stories Of Chekhov, Mark Richard Purves Sep 2014

Marriage In The Short Stories Of Chekhov, Mark Richard Purves

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Marriage in the Short Stories of Chekhov" Mark Richard Purves explores Anton Chekhov's often occurring depiction of marriage. Purves posits that Chekhov's depiction of the experience of marriage raises important ontological questions about the core features of family life such as what it means to be a husband, what it means to be a wife, and the degree of relatedness between them. Chekhov elaborates on what he sees as matrimony's central antinomy, namely that the wedding of one individual to another produces loneliness, an absence of intimacy, and a kind of alienation so acute ...


Hotel Bukovyna, Rebecca Ann Bosshart Aug 2014

Hotel Bukovyna, Rebecca Ann Bosshart

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This collection of short stories and first chapter of a novella take place in the historical area of Bukovyna, the beech tree land, partly located in Chernivetska region, western Ukraine. On the edge of it, or under it, or traveling to and from it, in contemporary time. I've been occupied with "the outsider," represented here, and where the seven stories reside, by the giant grande dame tourist hotel on Main Street, across from Shevchenko Park, in Chernivtsi, the region's city center. The occupants: the outsider looking in and around. Outsiders looking at other outsiders. An outsider being welcomed ...


Driving Force Of The Ukraine Crisis, Mark Mccarthy Jul 2014

Driving Force Of The Ukraine Crisis, Mark Mccarthy

Faculty Work Comprehensive List

"For many people in North America, trying to understand what is taking place in Eastern Europe between Russia and Ukraine can be a bit confusing. Even Winston Churchill once described this part of Europe as a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. "

Posting about the crisis in Ukraine from In All Things - an online hub committed to the claim that the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ has implications for the entire world.

http://inallthings.org/the-driving-force-of-the-ukraine-crisis/


Book Review: Katherine Marsengill, Portraits And Icons: Between Reality And Spirituality In Byzantine Art. Byzantios, 5. Turnhout, Bropols 2013., Jelena Bogdanović Jul 2014

Book Review: Katherine Marsengill, Portraits And Icons: Between Reality And Spirituality In Byzantine Art. Byzantios, 5. Turnhout, Bropols 2013., Jelena Bogdanović

Architecture Publications

In this thought-provoking and controversial book, which develops from her prize-winning doctoral dissertation from Princeton University (2010), art historian Katherine Marsengill examines multiple and complex relations between portraits and holy icons in Byzantine art.


Pavel Tretiakov’S Icons, Wendy Salmond Jun 2014

Pavel Tretiakov’S Icons, Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Books and Book Chapters

"Between 1890 and his death in 1898, the Moscow art collector Pavel Tretiakov acquired sixty-two icons of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. With this comparatively late entry into the world of icons, Tretiakov laid the foundation for one of the world’s greatest collections of medieval Russian paintings. Why is it, then, that Tretiakov’s icons are today so rarely mentioned and so hard to find? The most practical explanation is that they were simply swallowed up into the vast repositories of the reorganized State Tretiakov Gallery in 1930, along with thousands of icons from churches and private collections nationalized ...


Cultural Discourse Analysis Of Russian Alcohol Consumption, Elena V. Nuciforo May 2014

Cultural Discourse Analysis Of Russian Alcohol Consumption, Elena V. Nuciforo

Doctoral Dissertations

The study uses cultural discourse analysis to explore alcohol consumption that is valued as normal and enjoyable, and to examine how alcohol consumption is viewed as a problem in both folk and official discourses in Russia. An event called “posidet’” (to sit) is deeply embedded in Russian cultural discourse in the form of a communication ritual with enjoyable alcohol consumption. The ritual has a structured sequence, commonly upheld norms, and a multilayered “sacred object” that provides access to cultural meanings of Russian personhood, relations, actions, emotions, and location in the nature of things. A ritualistic corrective sequence in case someone ...


The Moralist’S Perspective: An Analysis Of A Contemporary Reader’S Connection To Leo Tolstoy’S Themes Of Life As Presented In Five Selected Works, Kelly Almeter May 2014

The Moralist’S Perspective: An Analysis Of A Contemporary Reader’S Connection To Leo Tolstoy’S Themes Of Life As Presented In Five Selected Works, Kelly Almeter

Syracuse University Honors Program Capstone Projects

For my honors capstone I examined the development of Tolstoy’s philosophies and how they are illustrated throughout his literature. I have compared two of Tolstoy’s works written before his theological conversion: “The Cossacks” and Anna Karenina, to three short stories written after, “The Death of Ivan Ilych”, “The Kreutzer Sonata,” and “Master and Man”. As time passed, the moralistic undertones of Tolstoy’s works became more apparent. His literature, whether short story or novel, includes a vast number of complex themes ranging from topics such as death and infidelity to a spiritual awakening and nature. As a result ...


Panel 10: "Complex Social Memory: Revolving Social Roles In Holodomor Survivor Testimony, 1986-1988", Johnathon Vsetecka Apr 2014

Panel 10: "Complex Social Memory: Revolving Social Roles In Holodomor Survivor Testimony, 1986-1988", Johnathon Vsetecka

Phi Alpha Theta Nu Alpha & UW History Club

In 1932 and 1933, Ukraine experienced a man-made famine that destroyed between three and five million people in less than two years. Scholars, members of the Ukrainian diaspora, and others now refer to the event as the Holodomor (death by starvation). The collectivization process brought upon Ukraine by the Soviet Union intended to procure grain from Ukraine’s fertile soil and sell it to Western markets at an increased in price. The result was disastrous and the famine left many dead due to disease, hunger, and malnutrition. Furthermore, the famine disrupted Ukrainian social life and forced people out of their ...


Martin Luther: Vater Einer Allgemeinen Sprache? Martin Luther: Father Of A Common Language?, Annika Ewaldz, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor Apr 2014

Martin Luther: Vater Einer Allgemeinen Sprache? Martin Luther: Father Of A Common Language?, Annika Ewaldz, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

Martin Luther is well known for his 95 Theses, in which he rejects the Catholic practice of selling indulgences; but it was his groundbreaking translation of the Bible into German that instigated the standardization of the German language. After his excommunication, Luther was in hiding in the Wartburg Castle, where he translated his Bible into a vernacular and cohesive form of the German language. Many different dialects were spoken throughout Germany at the time making communication between regions difficult. Luther’s translation soon became the most influential Bible in Germany and was disseminated quickly due to the recently invented printing ...


Patterns Of Language Use And Language Choice Among The Cuban Community In Russia, Maria Yakushkina Apr 2014

Patterns Of Language Use And Language Choice Among The Cuban Community In Russia, Maria Yakushkina

Open Access Theses

The multiculturalism of a modern society involves constant interrelations of minority and dominant linguistic communities, which are reflected in language. Within this context patterns of language use and choice, language attitudes and language and identity connection have received special attention from a sociolinguistic perspective to better understand the outcomes of such language contact

The aim of the present study is to analyze patterns of language use, language choice, and language identity issues of two groups of Cuban immigrants in Russian society: individuals born in Cuba with both parents of Cuban origin (CC group) and individuals born in Cuba from mixed ...


One State, One People, One Language: A Comparison Of Chinese And Soviet Langauge Policy In The 20th Century, Rachel Faith Apr 2014

One State, One People, One Language: A Comparison Of Chinese And Soviet Langauge Policy In The 20th Century, Rachel Faith

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In line with Michael Gorham’s argument in his monograph Speaking in Soviet Tongues that recent trends in the sociology of language have come to link language with issues of power and authority, this thesis argues that the cultural administrators in the Soviet Union and the PRC approached language culture and development with the intention of using it as a means of state building. A case study of the Mongolian language and its interaction with Soviet and Chinese policy shows this process in detail.


The Holy Fool In Late Tarkovsky, Robert O. Efird Mar 2014

The Holy Fool In Late Tarkovsky, Robert O. Efird

Journal of Religion & Film

This article analyzes the Russian cultural and religious phenomenon of holy foolishness (iurodstvo) in director Andrei Tarkovsky’s last two films, Nostalghia and Sacrifice. While traits of the holy fool appear in various characters throughout the director’s oeuvre, a marked change occurs in the films made outside the Soviet Union. Coincident with the films’ increasing disregard for spatiotemporal consistency and sharper eschatological focus, the character of the fool now appears to veer off into genuine insanity, albeit with a seemingly greater sensitivity to a visionary or virtual world of the spirit and explicit messianic task.


Tötösy De Zepetnek, Steven Curriculum Vitae, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Tötösy De Zepetnek, Steven Curriculum Vitae, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

No abstract provided.


Purdue University Press Monograph Series Of Books In Comparative Cultural Studies, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Purdue University Press Monograph Series Of Books In Comparative Cultural Studies, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

No abstract provided.


Cumulative Index Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture (1999-), Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Cumulative Index Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture (1999-), Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

No abstract provided.


Bibliography For Work In Digital Humanities And (Inter)Mediality Studies, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Bibliography For Work In Digital Humanities And (Inter)Mediality Studies, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

No abstract provided.


Annual Reports Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture 1999-, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Annual Reports Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture 1999-, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Dystopia: Isaiah Berlin And The Novels Of Huxley And Zamyatin, James Roney Mar 2014

The Role Of Dystopia: Isaiah Berlin And The Novels Of Huxley And Zamyatin, James Roney

Arts and Letters Conference

Dystopia remains an essential genre in modern and postmodern science fiction because it examines the tensions inherent in using science and technology either to stabilize progress or to create a perfect world. Stephen Toulmin’s account of the modern yearning for a stable, rational order beneath the surface variety of life and Isaiah Berlin’s analysis of the conceptual contradictions of utopian thought show the larger intellectual context of two famous dystopias: Evgeny Zamyatin’s We and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. We uses a fragmented, first-person narration to show the dissolution of the mind of its mathematician narrator ...


Unmasking The Protester: The Meanings And Myths Of Collective Civil Resistance Movements In African American And Polish Postresistance Prose Fiction, Agnieszka Herra Jan 2014

Unmasking The Protester: The Meanings And Myths Of Collective Civil Resistance Movements In African American And Polish Postresistance Prose Fiction, Agnieszka Herra

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

My contention is that the narrative framework of social movements, especially the ones deemed “successful” such as the American Civil Rights Movement and the Polish Solidarity Movement, reflects unity and collectivity within collective memory. During the period of the movements’ duration, this provides a clear rhetorical purpose: to give the appearance of unity in order to give effective voice to the demands. I argue that the voices that did not fit into the collective movements emerge subsequently to question this monologic language in literary form. This dissertation uses Bakhtin’s notion of dialogic language to argue that novels in the ...