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Articles 31 - 39 of 39

Full-Text Articles in Sign Languages

Using Sign Language With Hearing Preschool Children, Jamie E. Johnson Jan 2009

Using Sign Language With Hearing Preschool Children, Jamie E. Johnson

Graduate Research Papers

The purposed of this review is to examine the effects of using American Sign Language (ASL) with hearing preschool children without disabilities. The research examined the effects on cognitive skills, fine motor skills, IQ, student behavior, and memory when American Sign Language is implemented into a preschool classroom. A variety of sources were examined and synthesized to provide the reader with informational data and recommendations.


Using Space To Describe Space: American Sign Language And The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Cindee Calton Jan 2005

Using Space To Describe Space: American Sign Language And The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Cindee Calton

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

My study sought to combine two topics that have recently generated much interest among anthropologists. One of these topics is American Sign Language, the other is linguistic relativity. Although both topics have been a part of the literature for some time, neither has been studied extensively until the recent past. Both present exciting new horizons for understanding culture, particularly language and culture.

The first of these two topics is the study of American Sign Language. The reason for its previous absence from the literature has to do with unfortunate prejudice which, for a long time, kept ASL from being recognized ...


Active Learning Techniques To Teach Spanish Vocabulary, Sara E. Janssen Jan 2003

Active Learning Techniques To Teach Spanish Vocabulary, Sara E. Janssen

Graduate Research Papers

The journal article, "Pictures, John Travolta moves, and Sign Language: Active Learning Techniques to Teach Spanish Vocabulary," discusses the experiences 8th grade Spanish students had while using three instructional practices for learning vocabulary. Active learning strategies are a popular method for educators, especially those at the middle level. Educators can get their students active in learning by doing many different things. Pictures, "silly signs," and sign language were used to engage my students in learning fourteen Spanish vocabulary words.

Three groups of Spanish exploratory classes were the subjects in this study. Each of the three groups received instruction using one ...


Effectiveness Compared: Asl Interpretation Vs. Transliteration, Sue Livingston, Bonnie Singer, Theodore Abramson Apr 1994

Effectiveness Compared: Asl Interpretation Vs. Transliteration, Sue Livingston, Bonnie Singer, Theodore Abramson

Publications and Research

Two kinds of interpretation are currently used to make the spoken language accessible to deaf students in regular college programs; namely, ASL Interpretation and Transliteration. To test the effectiveness of each kind, 43 students from several colleges of the City University of New York were divided into two groups by their preference for one or the other kind, and the groups divided according to level of education. Matched groups then received a narrative presentation and a lecture presentation, interpreted either one way or the other by experienced certified interpreters, and then answered questions on the material so received. The results ...


The Tempest In Translation: Shakespeare And American Sign Language, Peter Novak Jan 1993

The Tempest In Translation: Shakespeare And American Sign Language, Peter Novak

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part Ii, Lil Brannon, Sue Livingston Jul 1986

An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part Ii, Lil Brannon, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

How might deaf children acquire one of the primary goals of education literacy in English? This article suggests that literacy in English as well as knowledge of the English language can be acquired concomitantly through developmental reading and writing activities that reflect principles of first language acquisition if students bring to these activities relatable experiences which they have already linguistically represented. Such activities engage students in reading and writing where content and context support them in their attempts to actively understand and convey meaning in English. The end product of, rather than the prerequisite for, this meaningful reading and writing ...


An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part I, Sue Livingston Mar 1986

An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part I, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

Quigley and Kretschmer (1982) asserted that the primary goal of education for deaf children should be literacy in English. This article presents an alternative view that there be two primary goals: (a) thinking and learning through the development of meaning-making and meaning-sharing capacities and (b) the acquisition of literacy in English. In this article, the first of these goals is viewed as the more fundamental since it facilitates the acquisition of knowledge while it simultaneously serves as the prerequisite for the acquisition of literacy in English. Because neither direct language instruction nor the exclusive use of English in sign will ...


Levels Of Development In The Language Of Deaf Children: Asl Grammatical Processes, Signed English Structures, Semantic Features, Sue Livingston Oct 1983

Levels Of Development In The Language Of Deaf Children: Asl Grammatical Processes, Signed English Structures, Semantic Features, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

This study describes the spontaneous sign language of six deaf children (6 to 16 years old) of hearing parents, who were exposed to Signed English when after the age of six they first attended a school for the deaf. Samples of their language taken at three times over a 15-month period were searched for processes and structures representative or not representative of Signed English. The nature of their developing semantics was described as the systematic acquisition of features of meaning in signs from selected lexical categories (kinship terms, negation, time expression, wh-questions, descriptive terms, and prepositions/conjunctions).

Processes not representative ...


Increasing Staff Use Of Sign Language, Melanie Hepworth Neville Jan 1983

Increasing Staff Use Of Sign Language, Melanie Hepworth Neville

University of the Pacific Theses and Dissertations

This study examined the effectiveness of two procedures, a visual cue and performance posting, to modify the use of sign language by psychiatric technicians. The visual cue was first introduced alone, then paired with performance posting to encourage staff use of sign language with the developmentally disabled children in their charge. Application of the visual cue alone produced little change in staff sign useage. The visual cue plus performance posting condition increased staff use of sign language during mealtimes. Four weeks of follow-up data indicated that the use of sign language remained at a level well above baseline.