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Full-Text Articles in Sign Languages

Collaboration With Interpreters In K-12 Education, Karen E. Brimm May 2018

Collaboration With Interpreters In K-12 Education, Karen E. Brimm

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

Educational interpreting for students who are Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH), like other interpreting specializations, involves much more than linguistic competence, message management skills, and cultural competence. An educational interpreter uses those skills and competencies within the K-12 environment populated by other educational professionals (e.g., related services personnel and teachers). Best practices in educational interpreting suggest that collaboration between the interpreter and the rest of the IEP team is fundamental. However, strategies for such collaboration are not outlined in the literature. This two-phase study examined collaboration in the K-12 school setting between educational interpreters and other educational professionals ...


Meeting The Interpreting Needs Of Deaf And Hard Of Hearing High School Students, Ursula P. Dierauer May 2018

Meeting The Interpreting Needs Of Deaf And Hard Of Hearing High School Students, Ursula P. Dierauer

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

This small scale pilot study asked how deaf and hard of hearing high school students currently perceive the effectiveness of their educational interpreting services and how those same students suggest interpreting services could be improved. In order to do so data was collected via survey and focus group from deaf and hard of hearing students attending a large Midwestern school district. Results yielded themes regarding student comfort with interpreters, student satisfaction with interpreters, logistical issues with an interpreted education, interpreter attributes, and ways in which students could work alongside interpreters. From these results recommendations to the school district and educational ...


Effectiveness Compared: Asl Interpretation Vs. Transliteration, Sue Livingston, Bonnie Singer, Theodore Abramson Apr 1994

Effectiveness Compared: Asl Interpretation Vs. Transliteration, Sue Livingston, Bonnie Singer, Theodore Abramson

Publications and Research

Two kinds of interpretation are currently used to make the spoken language accessible to deaf students in regular college programs; namely, ASL Interpretation and Transliteration. To test the effectiveness of each kind, 43 students from several colleges of the City University of New York were divided into two groups by their preference for one or the other kind, and the groups divided according to level of education. Matched groups then received a narrative presentation and a lecture presentation, interpreted either one way or the other by experienced certified interpreters, and then answered questions on the material so received. The results ...


An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part Ii, Lil Brannon, Sue Livingston Jul 1986

An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part Ii, Lil Brannon, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

How might deaf children acquire one of the primary goals of education literacy in English? This article suggests that literacy in English as well as knowledge of the English language can be acquired concomitantly through developmental reading and writing activities that reflect principles of first language acquisition if students bring to these activities relatable experiences which they have already linguistically represented. Such activities engage students in reading and writing where content and context support them in their attempts to actively understand and convey meaning in English. The end product of, rather than the prerequisite for, this meaningful reading and writing ...


An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part I, Sue Livingston Mar 1986

An Alternative View Of Education For Deaf Children: Part I, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

Quigley and Kretschmer (1982) asserted that the primary goal of education for deaf children should be literacy in English. This article presents an alternative view that there be two primary goals: (a) thinking and learning through the development of meaning-making and meaning-sharing capacities and (b) the acquisition of literacy in English. In this article, the first of these goals is viewed as the more fundamental since it facilitates the acquisition of knowledge while it simultaneously serves as the prerequisite for the acquisition of literacy in English. Because neither direct language instruction nor the exclusive use of English in sign will ...


Levels Of Development In The Language Of Deaf Children: Asl Grammatical Processes, Signed English Structures, Semantic Features, Sue Livingston Oct 1983

Levels Of Development In The Language Of Deaf Children: Asl Grammatical Processes, Signed English Structures, Semantic Features, Sue Livingston

Publications and Research

This study describes the spontaneous sign language of six deaf children (6 to 16 years old) of hearing parents, who were exposed to Signed English when after the age of six they first attended a school for the deaf. Samples of their language taken at three times over a 15-month period were searched for processes and structures representative or not representative of Signed English. The nature of their developing semantics was described as the systematic acquisition of features of meaning in signs from selected lexical categories (kinship terms, negation, time expression, wh-questions, descriptive terms, and prepositions/conjunctions).

Processes not representative ...