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American Sign Language

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Full-Text Articles in Sign Languages

Disfluent Pausing Effects On Listener Judgments Of An Asl-English Interpretation, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Kim A. Purdy Apr 2019

Disfluent Pausing Effects On Listener Judgments Of An Asl-English Interpretation, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Kim A. Purdy

Stephen Fitzmaurice

Although not all spoken language pauses are purposeful or functional, there is general agreement on the function and appropriate length and placement of pauses in English. Failing to conform to this agreement constitutes a pausing disfluency. In an interpreted environment, pauses do not generally detract from the discourse event, nor do they negatively impact the participants’ perception of one another, as long as the interpreter maintains generally acceptable pausing parameters (Fors, 2011; Heldner & Edlund, 2010; Krivokapi, 2007). Listeners of any communication event invariably form opinions about the speaker’s personality and make judgments about their character and background, forming a favorable or ...


Best Practices For Educational Interpreters In South Carolina, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Karen Chamness, Diane Formhals, Terri Gross, Beth Ann Kluft, Maureen Irons, Susie Spainhour, Anita Steichen-Mcdaniel, Eric Weber, Sara J. Mckay Apr 2019

Best Practices For Educational Interpreters In South Carolina, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Karen Chamness, Diane Formhals, Terri Gross, Beth Ann Kluft, Maureen Irons, Susie Spainhour, Anita Steichen-Mcdaniel, Eric Weber, Sara J. Mckay

Stephen Fitzmaurice

The purpose of this reference is to provide districts, charter schools, and state operated programs with best practices for working with educational interpreters including, but not limited to, roles and responsibilities, code of professional conduct, and suggested credentialing. It is not required by regulation but is simply the most up-to-date recommendation from the field.


Pronouns In Asl-English Simultaneous Interpretation, David Quinto-Pozos, Kierstin Muroski, Emily Saunders Mar 2019

Pronouns In Asl-English Simultaneous Interpretation, David Quinto-Pozos, Kierstin Muroski, Emily Saunders

Journal of Interpretation

Pronominal systems across languages mark grammatical categories in different ways, and this can pose challenges for simultaneous interpretation. Pronouns can also be ambiguous, for example, by collapsing distinctions in some forms or by resembling demonstratives. We examine pronouns produced by a Deaf signer of American Sign Language (ASL) within a TEDx talk and how they are interpreted (simultaneously) by an ASL-English interpreter. Pronouns from both languages were coded and scrutinized for semantic correspondence across the two languages. Robust correspondences were found with some personal pronouns, especially first-person forms. However, mismatches across languages, in particular third-person forms and demonstratives, provide evidence ...


Impact Of American Sign Language On Early Development, Haley W. Gilreath Nov 2018

Impact Of American Sign Language On Early Development, Haley W. Gilreath

Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference (GURC)

Abstract

Exposure to language during prenatal and early post-natal advancement is crucial to cognitive and emotional development. Deaf newborns who are born to hearing parents are deprived of language exposure during these vital months, simply because the parents have not had prior exposure to American Sign Language (ASL) and are unable to introduce even the most elemental signs. Despite the strong campaign to push for awareness of the developmental advantages of ASL on early development, previous studies have been unable to establish credible evidence that fully supports the benefits of exposing all children to the signed language. This is because ...


American Sign Language Interpreters And Their Influence On The Hearing World, Madison Groat Oct 2018

American Sign Language Interpreters And Their Influence On The Hearing World, Madison Groat

Senior Honors Theses

This honors thesis is going to discuss the hearing community’s perception of American Sign Language and by association the hearing community’s perception of the Deaf community. For most of the hearing community their only interaction with American Sign Language is through watching an interpreter perform at their job. They personally have no physical interactions with the language. Even though they have never personally used the language or attempted to interact with the Deaf community they will draw their own conclusions about sign language and the Deaf community. The conclusions that are assumed tend to be incorrect. Early on ...


South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center Annual Report, Stephen Fitzmaurice Sep 2018

South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center Annual Report, Stephen Fitzmaurice

Publications

Clemson University and its partners at the South Carolina State Department of Education and the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind manage the South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center (SCEIC) at the University Center in Greenville, South Carolina. The SCEIC provides national performance and knowledge assessments, mentoring and educational opportunities for South Carolina Educational Interpreters. This annual report details the SCEIC outputs and outcomes for Educational Interpreters in the state for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Achieving Immersive Gameplay: Interpreters And Video Game Accessibility, Rebekah Cheeley Jun 2018

Achieving Immersive Gameplay: Interpreters And Video Game Accessibility, Rebekah Cheeley

Honors Senior Theses/Projects

ASL/English interpreters (ASLEI) are exploring their influence and how they impact the communities they work with. Sensitive to oppression and marginalization of the needs of the d/Deaf community, interpreters and interpreting students are looking at how they can best support greater accessibility for people with who identify as d/Deaf or hard of hearing. Video games are one such area where accessibility is lacking. Problems include reliance on sound cues for crucial survival information...


Discourse Features In An Asl Catholic Homily: Pausing, Listing, And Mouthing, Nancy Dekorte Sullivan May 2018

Discourse Features In An Asl Catholic Homily: Pausing, Listing, And Mouthing, Nancy Dekorte Sullivan

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

This paper describes an initial discourse analysis of a homily (sermon) given in American Sign Language (ASL) at a Catholic mass in the presence of a Deaf congregation. The data for the analysis was obtained using a digital video recording made as the homily was being presented. Using ELAN, a program developed for linguistic analysis, the homily was transcribed. Discourse features that make this homily coherent, interesting, and engaging were noted. While many features were observed, three were chosen for analysis: pausing, listing, and the prolific presence of mouthing English words throughout the ASL discourse. The structure of the Catholic ...


Exploring Deaf Physicians’ And Physician Trainees’ Experiences With Designated Interpreters, Todd S.K. Agan May 2018

Exploring Deaf Physicians’ And Physician Trainees’ Experiences With Designated Interpreters, Todd S.K. Agan

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

The term “designated interpreter,” introduced by Hauser, Finch, and Hauser (2008), continues to be an emerging concept in the field of signed language interpretation. Whereas this role has been discussed by deaf professional and designated interpreter teams, or by interpreters themselves, there is a lack of perspective on this role exclusively from those deaf professionals who work with interpreters. Using a demographic survey and an ethnographic interview, deaf physicians and physician trainees were asked about their experiences with interpreters for this pilot study, and to conceptualize what a designated interpreter is and does. Results of this study suggest that a ...


Language Preferences Of Deaf Employees At The Department Of Defense, Trisha H. Montgomery May 2018

Language Preferences Of Deaf Employees At The Department Of Defense, Trisha H. Montgomery

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

In the last 10 years, the workplace setting has become a new research topic in the field of signed language interpreting. This research, an adapted study from Birr (2010), looked at the language preferences among Deaf employees at the Department of Defense (DoD). Participants assessed an interpretation from spoken English to American Sign Language (ASL) and a transliteration from spoken English to contact sign. They then provided feedback regarding the two language models and which language model they preferred for each of eight specific settings commonly found in the federal government environment. This study considered various factors influencing the language ...


Collaboration With Interpreters In K-12 Education, Karen E. Brimm May 2018

Collaboration With Interpreters In K-12 Education, Karen E. Brimm

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

Educational interpreting for students who are Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH), like other interpreting specializations, involves much more than linguistic competence, message management skills, and cultural competence. An educational interpreter uses those skills and competencies within the K-12 environment populated by other educational professionals (e.g., related services personnel and teachers). Best practices in educational interpreting suggest that collaboration between the interpreter and the rest of the IEP team is fundamental. However, strategies for such collaboration are not outlined in the literature. This two-phase study examined collaboration in the K-12 school setting between educational interpreters and other educational professionals ...


Exploring The Racial Microaggressions American Sign Language–English Interpreters Commit, Cheryl Gallon May 2018

Exploring The Racial Microaggressions American Sign Language–English Interpreters Commit, Cheryl Gallon

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

This phenomenological case study explores the racial microaggression committed by ASL– English interpreters. Data regarding microaggression events were collected by documenting experiences of Deaf People of Color through semi-structured interviews. To date, there is not any identified research investigating this topic. The field of professional sign language interpretation has a historical praxis of centering White epistemologies, while marginalizing the lived experiences of both Deaf and hearing People of Color in both formative interpreter education, as well as professional trainings. The growing interest in topics relating to social justice in the field of sign language interpretation has brought about an increase ...


Meeting The Interpreting Needs Of Deaf And Hard Of Hearing High School Students, Ursula P. Dierauer May 2018

Meeting The Interpreting Needs Of Deaf And Hard Of Hearing High School Students, Ursula P. Dierauer

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

This small scale pilot study asked how deaf and hard of hearing high school students currently perceive the effectiveness of their educational interpreting services and how those same students suggest interpreting services could be improved. In order to do so data was collected via survey and focus group from deaf and hard of hearing students attending a large Midwestern school district. Results yielded themes regarding student comfort with interpreters, student satisfaction with interpreters, logistical issues with an interpreted education, interpreter attributes, and ways in which students could work alongside interpreters. From these results recommendations to the school district and educational ...


Exploring The Work Of K-12 Interpreters At One School For The Deaf, Lena K. Stavely May 2018

Exploring The Work Of K-12 Interpreters At One School For The Deaf, Lena K. Stavely

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

Emergent signers are Deaf students with a spoken language foundation who are learning within educational environments where ASL is the shared and dominant language. Emergent signers’ growing presence within Deaf school classrooms has created a new opportunity in educational interpreting research because they require spoken language interpreting services while learning within these settings. Interpreting is produced primarily from ASL to spoken English. This pilot case study illuminates the factors that influence interpreters’ decision-making in an ASL-dominant K-12 educational setting, at one school for the Deaf. Furthermore, the study documents strategies used by interpreters in response to those factors. This project ...


The Evolution Of Coda Interpreters, Athena Crosby-Martin May 2018

The Evolution Of Coda Interpreters, Athena Crosby-Martin

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity Thesis or Action Research Project

Hearing children born to deaf parents, known as Codas are born into a world where they are bimodal bilingual, as well as bicultural. They must navigate the distinct differences between spoken and signed languages and hearing and Deaf communities, often acting as interpreters for situations well beyond their maturity level. Codas simultaneously belong to both worlds, but to neither. Many Codas go on to become professional interpreters, and their unique childhood experience and identities create a space of complexity within the interpreting community. Older Codas grew up in a time before technological aids to the Deaf were available, or professional ...


Understanding Deaf Culture, Meghan Flanagan May 2018

Understanding Deaf Culture, Meghan Flanagan

Senior Honors Projects

Culture defines people and gives them a sense of identity. It provides a community for individuals with similar beliefs and values to communicate with one another using a shared language. Deaf Culture encompasses these principles, but it is unique in that it has it’s own fully developed language known as American Sign Language (ASL). ASL is a verbal language that incorporates all of the linguistic components of a spoken language such as syntax, idioms, and dialect variation. It allows the deaf community to have a distinct sense of humor along with their own traditions, literature, and theater. All of ...


The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly: Students Report On Experiences With Instructors In Interpreter Education Programs, Ann Adamiak Mar 2018

The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly: Students Report On Experiences With Instructors In Interpreter Education Programs, Ann Adamiak

Master's of Arts in Interpreting Studies (MAIS) Theses

This research study was exploratory in nature, seeking to gather and document the experiences and perceptions of current and former students in interpreter education programs with the focus of interpreting between signed language and spoken language in the United States. Data was collected through an online survey for a three-week period, resulting in 514 consenting respondents from 40 states and 126 distinct interpreter education programs. The mixed methods study included quantitative and qualitative questions. The qualitative responses were coded, and emergent themes were identified in a grounded theory approach (Corbin & Strauss, 1990; McMilan & Schumacher, 2009; Strauss & Corbin, 1994, 1998). In this study, the data-driven themes have been limited to two top 10 lists for the most prevalent categories of positive and negative experiences with instructors. The findings show that the top 10 negative categories of student-reported experiences with faculty are: Personality; Feedback/Grading; Classroom Management; Intolerance for Others; Lack ...


Bridging The Communication Gap: Using Asl To Improve Communication With Students With Disabilities, Jamie Kane, Kaitlyn O’Hara, Scott Miles Jan 2018

Bridging The Communication Gap: Using Asl To Improve Communication With Students With Disabilities, Jamie Kane, Kaitlyn O’Hara, Scott Miles

Academic Festival Posters

Children with disabilities, including Down Syndrome and Autism, can often face challenges when communicating with their peers in the early childhood classroom. Communication is essential in order for children to develop cognitively and socially, both in the classroom and at home. There are various methods and strategies to improve a child’s communication. One prominent technique is to use American Sign Language (ASL). ASL has been shown to improve communication in early childhood, ranging from student-to-student and student-to-teacher/parent interactions. Using ASL in early childhood is an important, initial step at bridging the communication gap, because young children learn to ...


South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center Annual Report, Stephen Fitzmaurice Sep 2017

South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center Annual Report, Stephen Fitzmaurice

Publications

Clemson University has partnered with the South Carolina State Department of Education and the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind to open the South Carolina Educational Interpreting Center (SCEIC) at the University Center in Greenville, South Carolina. The SCEIC provides national performance and knowledge assessments, mentoring and educational opportunities for South Carolina Educational Interpreters. This annual report details the SCEIC outputs and outcomes for Educational Interpreters in the state for the 2016- 2017 academic year.


Best Practices For Educational Interpreters In South Carolina, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Karen Chamness, Diane Formhals, Terri Gross, Beth Ann Kluft, Maureen Irons, Susie Spainhour, Anita Steichen-Mcdaniel, Eric Weber, Sara J. Mckay Jan 2017

Best Practices For Educational Interpreters In South Carolina, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Karen Chamness, Diane Formhals, Terri Gross, Beth Ann Kluft, Maureen Irons, Susie Spainhour, Anita Steichen-Mcdaniel, Eric Weber, Sara J. Mckay

Publications

The purpose of this reference is to provide districts, charter schools, and state operated programs with best practices for working with educational interpreters including, but not limited to, roles and responsibilities, code of professional conduct, and suggested credentialing. It is not required by regulation but is simply the most up-to-date recommendation from the field.


Disfluent Pausing Effects On Listener Judgments Of An Asl-English Interpretation, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Kim A. Purdy Jan 2015

Disfluent Pausing Effects On Listener Judgments Of An Asl-English Interpretation, Stephen Fitzmaurice, Kim A. Purdy

Publications

Although not all spoken language pauses are purposeful or functional, there is general agreement on the function and appropriate length and placement of pauses in English. Failing to conform to this agreement constitutes a pausing disfluency. In an interpreted environment, pauses do not generally detract from the discourse event, nor do they negatively impact the participants’ perception of one another, as long as the interpreter maintains generally acceptable pausing parameters (Fors, 2011; Heldner & Edlund, 2010; Krivokapi, 2007). Listeners of any communication event invariably form opinions about the speaker’s personality and make judgments about their character and background, forming a favorable or ...


"Visual Asl": An American Sign Language Computer-Assisted Instruction Software, Heather Carter Jan 2011

"Visual Asl": An American Sign Language Computer-Assisted Instruction Software, Heather Carter

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Visual ASL is a computer-assisted instruction software for teaching beginner ASL (American Sign Language). The purpose of this software is to guide users through interactive lessons and quizzes in order to teach this language. In current state of the software, it covers material taught in a level one ASL class. It will teach similar content as the lessons from the ASL instruction book, Signing Naturally.


The Relationship Among Beginning And Advanced American Sign Language Students And Credentialed Interpreters Across Two Domains Of Visual Imagery: Vividness And Manipulation, Linda Stauffer May 2010

The Relationship Among Beginning And Advanced American Sign Language Students And Credentialed Interpreters Across Two Domains Of Visual Imagery: Vividness And Manipulation, Linda Stauffer

Theses and Dissertations

Given the visual-gestural nature of ASL it is reasonable to assume that visualization abilities may be one predictor of aptitude for learning ASL. This study tested a hypothesis that visualization abilities are a foundational aptitude for learning a signed language and that measurements of these skills will increase as students progress from beginning ASL students to advanced language learners and, ultimately to credentialed interpreters. Participants in this study consisted of 90 beginning and 66 advanced ASL students in five interpreter education programs in four southern states along with 68 credentialed interpreters. Students and interpreters were administered the Vividness of Visual ...


Using Space To Describe Space: American Sign Language And The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Cindee Calton Jan 2005

Using Space To Describe Space: American Sign Language And The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Cindee Calton

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

My study sought to combine two topics that have recently generated much interest among anthropologists. One of these topics is American Sign Language, the other is linguistic relativity. Although both topics have been a part of the literature for some time, neither has been studied extensively until the recent past. Both present exciting new horizons for understanding culture, particularly language and culture.

The first of these two topics is the study of American Sign Language. The reason for its previous absence from the literature has to do with unfortunate prejudice which, for a long time, kept ASL from being recognized ...


Increasing Staff Use Of Sign Language, Melanie Hepworth Neville Jan 1983

Increasing Staff Use Of Sign Language, Melanie Hepworth Neville

University of the Pacific Theses and Dissertations

This study examined the effectiveness of two procedures, a visual cue and performance posting, to modify the use of sign language by psychiatric technicians. The visual cue was first introduced alone, then paired with performance posting to encourage staff use of sign language with the developmentally disabled children in their charge. Application of the visual cue alone produced little change in staff sign useage. The visual cue plus performance posting condition increased staff use of sign language during mealtimes. Four weeks of follow-up data indicated that the use of sign language remained at a level well above baseline.