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Full-Text Articles in Religion

Spirituality Among Black Americans: A Hierarchical Classification Of The Family Strengths Model, Genese Clark Dec 2017

Spirituality Among Black Americans: A Hierarchical Classification Of The Family Strengths Model, Genese Clark

Public Access Theses and Dissertations from the College of Education and Human Sciences

There is a need for disaggregate data pertaining to the perceived strengths of Black American families. This study identified which traits are salient and dominant among African-American families according to the Family Strengths Model. Utilizing this model, a mixed methods study was conducted among Black Americans living in Connecticut who identify with belonging to a family (N=59) to investigate the importance of six family strength domains. Results found the hierarchical rank (from most important to least important) to be commitment, spirituality/ spiritual wellbeing, appreciation and affection, positive communication, time together, and the ability to manage stress and crisis effectively ...


Spirituality Among African American Christian Women Who Have Contemplated, Marilyn Wiley Jan 2017

Spirituality Among African American Christian Women Who Have Contemplated, Marilyn Wiley

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that African American women had the lowest recorded number of suicide completions among all ethnic and gender groups in the United States. In addition, the number of suicides among African American women continued to soar without a clear reason or understanding of their lowest completion rates. Further research in the area of spirituality among African American women may be critical in understanding why African American women's rates of completed suicides are statistically lower than other ethnic groups and how to prevent future rate increases. A phenomenological framework was used to examine ...


A Cross-Cultural Qualitative Study: The Differences In Attitudes And Opinions On Advance Care Planning Among African, Caucasian, And Latino Americans, Jennifer Sims Jan 2015

A Cross-Cultural Qualitative Study: The Differences In Attitudes And Opinions On Advance Care Planning Among African, Caucasian, And Latino Americans, Jennifer Sims

International ResearchScape Journal

The purpose of this study is to identify African American and Latino Americans’ beliefs and attitudes about advance care planning (ACP) and compare these with beliefs held by Caucasian Americans. The objectives are to identify if there are differences in opinions between racial groups and to provide relevant information for health and social service providers. African American and Latino American participants in this study indicated many factors that affect their hesitation to utilize ACP services: spiritual and religious beliefs; family caregiving; and lack of knowledge about ACP services. Implications for practice include providing easy-to-understand information about ACP to clients of ...


How Spiritual Values Correlate With Hospice Use For African Americans, Latrina Dion Frazier Jan 2015

How Spiritual Values Correlate With Hospice Use For African Americans, Latrina Dion Frazier

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

End of life hospice services have consistently been underused by African Americans. This disproportionate use of hospice has contributed to poor quality of life and a lack of cost-effective care for patients with terminal illness. Driven by the theory of reasoned action, the purpose of this quantitative study was to test associations between African Americans' perceptions of hospice, decisions to use hospice, and religiosity. A convenience sample of 154 African American adults was surveyed online. The survey instrument combined the AARP End of Life survey, Perception of Hospice survey, and the Religiousness Measure survey. The results of a multiple linear ...


A Theodicy Of Redemptive Suffering In African American Involvement Led By Absalom Jones And Richard Allen In The Philadelphia Yellow Fever Epidemic Of 1793, Kyle Boone Apr 2013

A Theodicy Of Redemptive Suffering In African American Involvement Led By Absalom Jones And Richard Allen In The Philadelphia Yellow Fever Epidemic Of 1793, Kyle Boone

Undergraduate Student Scholarship – History

This paper is a historical investigation into the involvement of African Americans during the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793. It explores key figures, details, medical realities, and media representation. The particular focus lies on the dilemma of suffering in the world and how the African American understanding of evil in this community led to their decision of involvement. Their understanding of theodicy will be weighed against modern philosophical and theological attempts to deal with theodicy.