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Full-Text Articles in Religion

Towards A Preliminary Portrait Of An Evangelical Missionary To The Jews: The Many Faces Of Alexander Mccaul (1799-1863), David B. Ruderman Dec 2015

Towards A Preliminary Portrait Of An Evangelical Missionary To The Jews: The Many Faces Of Alexander Mccaul (1799-1863), David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

We live in a time of prolific scholarly output on the history of Jews and Judaism where most inhibitions about what are appropriate subjects for study and what are not have disappeared. This is especially apparent with regard to the study of converts who opted to leave the Jewish faith and community both in the pre-modern and modern eras. Labelled disparagingly in the Jewish tradition as meshumadim (apostates), many earlier Jewish scholars treated them in a negative light or generally ignored them as not properly belonging any longer to the community and its historical legacy. When they were mentioned in ...


Are Jews The Only True Monotheists? Some Critical Reflections In Jewish Thought From The Renaissance To The Present, David B. Ruderman Jan 2015

Are Jews The Only True Monotheists? Some Critical Reflections In Jewish Thought From The Renaissance To The Present, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

Monotheism, by simple definition, implies a belief in one God for all peoples, not for one particular nation. But as the Shemah prayer recalls, God spoke exclusively to Israel in insisting that God is one. This address came to define the essential nature of the Jewish faith, setting it apart from all other faiths both in the pre-modern and modern worlds. This essay explores the positions of a variety of thinkers on the question of the exclusive status of monotheism in Judaism from the Renaissance until the present day. It first discusses the challenge offered to Judaism by the Renaissance ...


Can “Law” Be Private? The Mixed Message Of Rabbinic Oral Law, Natalie B. Dohrmann Jan 2015

Can “Law” Be Private? The Mixed Message Of Rabbinic Oral Law, Natalie B. Dohrmann

Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

A great deal of ink has been spilled on the question of early rabbinic literary culture and the rabbinic dedication to the development of an explicitly oral legal tradition. In this essay I will argue that given that the manifest content of early rabbinic discourse is law, it is productive to look to the very public practices of communication inscribed, literally and figuratively, in the Roman legal culture of the east. Within this context, the rabbinic legal project makes sense as a form of provincial shadowing of a dominant Roman legal culture. This paper will explore the paradoxical rabbinic deployment ...


Opening The Book Of Marwood: English Catholics And Their Bibles In Early Modern Europe, Daniel Joseph Manuel Cheely Jan 2015

Opening The Book Of Marwood: English Catholics And Their Bibles In Early Modern Europe, Daniel Joseph Manuel Cheely

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

In Reformation studies, the printed Bible has long been regarded as an agent of change. This dissertation interrogates the conditions in which it did not Reform its readers. As recent scholarship has emphasized how Protestant doctrine penetrated culture through alternative media, such as preaching and printed ephemera, the revolutionary role of the scripture-book has become more ambiguous. Historians of reading, nevertheless, continue to focus upon radical, prophetic, and otherwise eccentric modes of interaction with the vernacular Bible, reinforcing the traditional notion that the conversion of revelation to print had a single historical trajectory and that an adversarial relationship between textual ...