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Full-Text Articles in Religion

Pusey's Sermons At St. Saviour's, Leeds, Robert Ellison Oct 2015

Pusey's Sermons At St. Saviour's, Leeds, Robert Ellison

Robert Ellison

"E . B. Pusey as a Preacher." It would not be surprising to find such a phrase as the title of a nineteenth-century work. Authors in both Britain and America used it in books and articles about numerous ministers, literary figures, the Apostle Paul, and even Jesus himself.1 Edward Bouverie Pusey, in fact, was the subject of one such piece: a review of Sermons for the Church's Seasons from Advent to Trinity, published in the Spectator on 11 August 1883. Such a scope would, however, be too broad for a scholarly study in the twenty-first century. Pusey's canon ...


Evangelicalism And Religious Pluralism In Contemporary America: Diversity Without, Diversity Within, And Maintaining The Borders, William Vance Trollinger Aug 2015

Evangelicalism And Religious Pluralism In Contemporary America: Diversity Without, Diversity Within, And Maintaining The Borders, William Vance Trollinger

William Vance Trollinger Jr.

Not that many people need convincing, but the 2008 American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) provides confirming evidence that evangelicalism in America is alive and well. In this survey, which involved 54,461 telephone interviews, the 76% of respondents who identified themselves as Christians were asked a follow-up question: "Do you identify as a Born Again or Evangelical Christian?" Forty-five percent answered yes. This number obviously includes a fair number of folks within "mainline" denominations and within predominately African-American churches; more surprising, perhaps, 18.9% of American Catholics identified themselves as "born again" or "evangelical." If one were to depend solely ...


Protestantism And Fundamentalism, William Vance Trollinger Aug 2015

Protestantism And Fundamentalism, William Vance Trollinger

William Vance Trollinger Jr.

The term "fundamentalism" has been used to describe a host of religious movements across the globe that are militantly antimodernist, aggressively patriarchal, literalist in their reading of sacred texts, and assiduous in their efforts to draw boundaries between themselves and outsiders. While "Islamic fundamentalism" has received the most attention, particularly after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, scholars and journalists have also applied the term to movements within such disparate traditions as Judaism, Sikhism, and Hinduism, as well as to various Christian groups. There are benefits to understanding fundamentalism as a global movement that grows out of deep-seated and intense ...


How John Nelson Darby Went Visiting: Dispensational Premillennialism In The Believers Church Tradition And The Historiography Of Fundamentalism, William Vance Trollinger Aug 2015

How John Nelson Darby Went Visiting: Dispensational Premillennialism In The Believers Church Tradition And The Historiography Of Fundamentalism, William Vance Trollinger

William Vance Trollinger Jr.

In the United States the history of John Nelson Darby's dispensational premillennialism is intimately tied up with the history of fundamentalism. It is difficult to talk about dispensational premillennialism in the believers church tradition in the twentieth century without making some reference to the fundamentalist movement. In fact, the two distinguishing marks of fundamentalist theology have been the doctrine of biblical inerrancy and the eschatological schema known as dispensationalism. It is thus rather surprising that historians have de-emphasized dispensational premillennialism in explaining the history of fundamentalism. I think that this is a mistake. But to explain why I think ...


Lions In The Desert: The Significance And Symbolism Of Lions In Early Egyptian Monastic Literature, Kyler Williamsen May 2015

Lions In The Desert: The Significance And Symbolism Of Lions In Early Egyptian Monastic Literature, Kyler Williamsen

Kyler Williamsen

Early monastic literature is filled with symbolism and employs allegory to instruct future generations of faithful ascetics. Animals are regularly used in these writings to demonstrate the spiritual power and prowess of the monk. While works such as Waddell’s Beasts and Saints or O’Malley’s The Animals of St. Gregory present a wonderful summary of animals in monastic literature, an analysis of the possible symbolic nature of these animals’ behavior in monastic literature is sorely lacking. My paper, entitled Lions in the Desert, explores the symbolic roles which played charting a monk’s progress in the ascetic life ...


The First Crusade, Was It Christian?, David C. Taylor Jr Mar 2015

The First Crusade, Was It Christian?, David C. Taylor Jr

David C Taylor Jr

On February 5th, 2015, President Barack Obama addressed the audience at the National Prayer Breakfast. During this breakfast he made comments about the Islamic State and the Crusades that sent waves throughout the religious world. In his speech, he claimed that just like the Islamic State is doing things, terrible things, in the name of Islam, we should remember that terrible things were done in the name of Christ during the Crusades. While it did not sit well with members of the church, the question must be asked. Was he right? This paper will examine the First Crusade, its cause ...


Nature Is My Home, Harold Mushenheim, Cecilia Mushenheim Jan 2015

Nature Is My Home, Harold Mushenheim, Cecilia Mushenheim

Cecilia A Mushenheim

Figures depicting the nativity of Jesus, created by Harold Mushenheim in 2010. The heads are sculpted clay, and the bodies are cloth-wrapped wire armature. The clothing was sewn by Cecilia Mushenheim. Exhibition label originally written by Fr. Johann G. Roten, S.M. for exhibit entitled "At The Manger: No Place Like Home" held at Roesch Library, University of Dayton.


The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager Dec 2014

The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager

Dan Rager

This article examines the Evolution and Antithesis of Western Music from early Biblical Times (3500 B.C.) through the Baroque Period (1600-1750 A. D.). The material presented encompasses many different cultures from around the world. Herein, the Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Jews, Romans, and other cultures are examined. Religious and cultural ideologies clash while similarities parallel these mediums exposing juxtapositions that transcend throughout the ages.
The article discusses early musical systems, periodical musical practices, musical elements (voices vs. instruments) permitted and forbidden by the church, the use of sacred and secular music and the development of these “musical forms” which include ...