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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Religion

Abraham Lincoln's Religion: The Case For His Ultimate Belief In A Personal, Sovereign God., Samuel W. Calhoun, Lucas E. Morel Jan 2013

Abraham Lincoln's Religion: The Case For His Ultimate Belief In A Personal, Sovereign God., Samuel W. Calhoun, Lucas E. Morel

Samuel W. Calhoun

None available.


Conviction Without Imposition: A Response To Professor Greenawalt, Samuel W. Calhoun Jan 2013

Conviction Without Imposition: A Response To Professor Greenawalt, Samuel W. Calhoun

Samuel W. Calhoun

None available.


May The President Appropriately Invoke God? Evaluating The Embryonic Stem Cell Vetoes, Samuel W. Calhoun Jan 2013

May The President Appropriately Invoke God? Evaluating The Embryonic Stem Cell Vetoes, Samuel W. Calhoun

Samuel W. Calhoun

President George W. Bush twice vetoed measures to provide federal funds for embryonic stem cell research requiring the destruction of human embryos. Each veto was premised in part upon his religious beliefs. President Bush’s reliance upon his faith provoked a strong negative reaction. This essay argues that this criticism is baseless. The essay demonstrates that important political leaders spanning three centuries— including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr.—have invoked religious beliefs in explaining their positions. The principle of “separation of church and state,” properly understood, is not a persuasive basis for criticizing this religious heritage ...


Getting The Framers Wrong: A Response To Professor Geoffrey Stone, Samuel W. Calhoun Jan 2013

Getting The Framers Wrong: A Response To Professor Geoffrey Stone, Samuel W. Calhoun

Samuel W. Calhoun

Professor Geoffrey Stone’s Essay, The World of the Framers: A Christian Nation?, seeks to state “the truth about . . . what [the Framers] believed, and about what they aspired to when they created this nation.” Doing so will accomplish Professor Stone’s main objective, helping us to understand what “the Constitution allows” on a host of controversial public policy issues.3 Regrettably, Professor Stone’s effort is unsuccessful. Although he clearly tried to be fair in his historical account,4 the Essay ultimately presents a misleading view of the Framers’ perspective on the proper relationship between religion and the state.