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Full-Text Articles in Religion

Reading The Story Of Miriai On Two Levels: Evidence From Mandaean Anti-Jewish Polemic About The Origins And Setting Of Early Mandaeism, James Mcgrath Feb 2011

Reading The Story Of Miriai On Two Levels: Evidence From Mandaean Anti-Jewish Polemic About The Origins And Setting Of Early Mandaeism, James Mcgrath

James F. McGrath

New Testament scholars, drawing on Mandaean sources to shed light on the Gospel of John, may have done more harm than good to both Johannine and Mandaean studies. Nonetheless, approaches to the Gospel of John developed over the past 50 years have shed light on the Gospel’s Jewish context and the clues its polemical emphases can provide about the time and setting in which it was written. J. L. Martyn’s suggestion that the Gospel of John can be read on “two levels”, telling us about the context in which it was written while telling a story set in ...


Was Jesus Illegitimate? The Evidence Of His Social Interactions, James Mcgrath Apr 2010

Was Jesus Illegitimate? The Evidence Of His Social Interactions, James Mcgrath

James F. McGrath

This article examines the social status of the historical Jesus in relation to recent studies that place Jesus into the social category of an illegitimate child. After surveying the evidence with respect to the situation of such individuals in first century Mediterranean and Jewish society, we shall proceed to examine whether Jesus' implied social status (as evidenced by accounts of his adult social interactions) coheres with what one would expect in the case of someone who bore the stigma of that status. Our study suggests that the scandal caused by Jesus' association with the marginalized clearly implies that he did ...


Was Jesus Illegitimate? The Evidence Of His Social Interactions, James F. Mcgrath Apr 2010

Was Jesus Illegitimate? The Evidence Of His Social Interactions, James F. Mcgrath

James F. McGrath

This article examines the social status of the historical Jesus in relation to recent studies that place Jesus into the social category of an illegitimate child. After surveying the evidence with respect to the situation of such individuals in first century Mediterranean and Jewish society, we shall proceed to examine whether Jesus' implied social status (as evidenced by accounts of his adult social interactions) coheres with what one would expect in the case of someone who bore the stigma of that status. Our study suggests that the scandal caused by Jesus' association with the marginalized clearly implies that he did ...