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Full-Text Articles in Religion

Apophatic Community: Yannaras On Relational Being, Fred Dallmayr Jan 2019

Apophatic Community: Yannaras On Relational Being, Fred Dallmayr

Comparative Philosophy

For Martin Heidegger the story of Western philosophy ended basically in egocentrism or the metaphysics of “subjectivity”; however, he acknowledged the possibility of another path in Greece: that of pre-Socratic thinking. Yet, there is a further path he did not acknowledge: the tradition of Orthodox philosophy and theology. The paper focuses on some key works of the prominent contemporary Greek philosopher Christos Yannaras, for a long time professor in Athens. Taking over the notions of “Being” and ontology, Yannaras construes them (with Heidegger) not as ontic “substances” amenable to epistemic knowledge, but as guideposts to “relational” or participatory experience. His ...


Nietzsche’S Critique Of Morality And Revaluation Of Values, Omar Bin Salamah Jan 2018

Nietzsche’S Critique Of Morality And Revaluation Of Values, Omar Bin Salamah

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

One of Nietzsche’s main projects was to critique morality and to invite a revaluation of our values. Neither secular nor religious interpretations of Nietzsche’s critique of morality do it justice. Each support their own interpretation by appealing to certain aspects of his writings. The former appeal to Nietzsche’s rejection of Christianity and Christian morality; while the latter appeal to Nietzsche’s anti-democratic and anti-egalitarian remarks. In actuality, Nietzsche was neither of the two: he argued that Western secular moralities are a modern manifestation of Christian morality, and that Christian morality is a manifestation of what he comes ...


Minority Report: Re-Reading Gilgamesh After Levinas, Francis Dominic Degnin Jul 2017

Minority Report: Re-Reading Gilgamesh After Levinas, Francis Dominic Degnin

Francis D. Degnin

The Epic of Gilgamesh attempts to answer the question of how, given the finality of death, one might find meaning and happiness in life. Many commentators argue that the text provides two separate, although ultimately unsatisfactory, alternatives. What these commentators appear to miss, however, is the possibility that these two solutions may not be separate. Using Levinas’s distinction between “need” and “desire,” I argue that, by the end of the Epic, they may in fact be synthesized into a single solution, one that suggests the priority of an affective moral grounding as prior to and more fundamental than intellectual ...


Minority Report: Re-Reading Gilgamesh After Levinas, Francis Dominic Degnin Jul 2016

Minority Report: Re-Reading Gilgamesh After Levinas, Francis Dominic Degnin

Faculty Publications

The Epic of Gilgamesh attempts to answer the question of how, given the finality of death, one might find meaning and happiness in life. Many commentators argue that the text provides two separate, although ultimately unsatisfactory, alternatives. What these commentators appear to miss, however, is the possibility that these two solutions may not be separate. Using Levinas’s distinction between “need” and “desire,” I argue that, by the end of the Epic, they may in fact be synthesized into a single solution, one that suggests the priority of an affective moral grounding as prior to and more fundamental than intellectual ...


A Critical Analysis Of Neural Buddhism's Explanation Of Moral Transformation, Jeffrey R. Dickson Dec 2015

A Critical Analysis Of Neural Buddhism's Explanation Of Moral Transformation, Jeffrey R. Dickson

Eleutheria

As non-theistic arguments for morality become increasingly sophisticated and complex, they are harder to criticize without first admiring their skillful design and near-artistry. One such argument involves a relatively new innovation that is the child of naturalism and eastern philosophy—Neural Buddhism. Like two world-renowned designers collaborating on a new garment, Naturalism and Buddhism have come together in this distinct program to offer something inventive, especially in its explanation of moral transformation. However, this critical analysis will ultimately reveal that Neural Buddhism’s explanation of moral transformation is incapable of providing good answers to several compelling criticisms.


A Taste Of Armageddon: When Warring Is Done By Drones And Robots, Brian Stiltner Jan 2015

A Taste Of Armageddon: When Warring Is Done By Drones And Robots, Brian Stiltner

Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Faculty Publications

Discusses the increasing use of drones and weaponized robots. Argues that the international community must put firm ethical guidelines in place before the technology becomes rampant.


The Reality Of Moral Imperatives In Liberal Religion, Howard Lesnick Jan 2013

The Reality Of Moral Imperatives In Liberal Religion, Howard Lesnick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This paper uses a classic one-liner attributed to Dostoyoevski’s Ivan Karamozov, "Without God everything is permitted," to explore some differences between what I term traditional and liberal religion. The expansive connotations and implications of Ivan’s words are grounded in the historic association of wrongfulness and punishment, and in a reaction against the late modern challenge to the inexorability of that association, whether in liberal religion or in secular moral thought. The paper argues that, with its full import understood, Ivan’s claim begs critical questions of the meaning and source of compulsion and choice, and of knowledge and ...


What Goes Around Comes Around: The Evolutionary Roots Of The Belief In Immanent Justice, Nicolas Baumard, Coralie Chevallier Jan 2012

What Goes Around Comes Around: The Evolutionary Roots Of The Belief In Immanent Justice, Nicolas Baumard, Coralie Chevallier

Goldstone Research Unit

The belief in immanent justice is the expectation that the universe is designed to ensure that evil is punished and virtue rewarded. What makes this belief so ‘natural’? Here, we suggest that this intuition of immanent justice derives from our evolved sense of fairness. In cases where a misdeed is followed by a misfortune, our sense of fairness construes the misfortune as a way to compensate for the misdeed. To test this hypothesis, we designed a set of studies in which we show that people who do not believe in immanent justice are nonetheless implicitly influenced by intuitions of immanent ...


Empiricism And Wesleyan Ethics, Kevin Twain Lowery Apr 2011

Empiricism And Wesleyan Ethics, Kevin Twain Lowery

Faculty Scholarship – Theology

In this article, the open-endedness of Wesleyan ethics is affirmed; attempts to articulate a system of Wesleyan ethics have been few, and it would be virtually impossible for any single expression of Wesleyan ethics to be regarded as definitive for the tradition as a whole. The fact that Wesleyan ethics is a relatively open field allows it to be developed in a number of ways that can still be regarded as Wesleyan or are at least consistent with basic Wesleyan commitments. Wesley’s allegiance to empiricism is then recalled, and the importance of addressing epistemological questions is stressed. An outline ...


Moral Foundation Theory And The Law, Colin Prince Jan 2010

Moral Foundation Theory And The Law, Colin Prince

Seattle University Law Review

Moral foundation theory argues that there are five basic moral foundations: (1) harm/care, (2) fairness/reciprocity, (3) ingroup/loyalty, (4) authority/respect, and (5) purity/sanctity. These five foundations comprise the building blocks of morality, regardless of the culture. In other words, while every society constructs its own morality, it is the varying weights that each society allots to these five universal foundations that create the variety. Haidt likens moral foundation theory to an “audio equalizer,” with each culture adjusting the sliders differently. The researchers, however, were not content to simply categorize moral foundations—they have tied the foundations ...


Galileo, Biotechnology, And Epistemological Humility: Moving Stewardship Beyond The Development-Conservation Debate, Charles C. Adams Mar 2007

Galileo, Biotechnology, And Epistemological Humility: Moving Stewardship Beyond The Development-Conservation Debate, Charles C. Adams

Pro Rege

This paper was presented, in modified form, at the sixty-first annual meeting of the American Scientific Affiliation, at Calvin College, July 28-31, 2006.


Nietzsche And The Religion Of The Future, Steven Michels Jan 2004

Nietzsche And The Religion Of The Future, Steven Michels

Government Faculty Publications

This article examines the place of religion in Nietzsche’s writings and how it fits with the task of a “new philosopher.” Although Nietzsche opposes all otherworldly, monotheistic religions, it is incorrect to say that Nietzsche proposes atheism as a solution. Religion, he contends, is an essential part of any healthy culture. Nietzsche’s new philosophy would fashion gods consistent with the natural order of rank and the highest aims of man.

Nietzsche conceives of modernity not as progress but an unhealthy and dangerous break with tradition that he seeks to set right. Consequently, he turns to the greatness of ...


Wittgenstein And The Recovery Of Virtue, G. Scott Davis Jan 2004

Wittgenstein And The Recovery Of Virtue, G. Scott Davis

Religious Studies Faculty Publications

Modern, scientific, man doesn't see miracles, only odd phenomena that call out for more thorough study. Ethics, like the miraculous, doesn't defy scientific explanation; it just doesn't exist. In what follows I hope to do two things., On the one hand, I want to embrace Wittgenstein's rejection of ethics as theory, in the sense of a systematic body of knowledge about the world. On the other, I hope to suggest that this rejection opens up conceptual space for understanding ethics as a critical human enterprise.


C.S. Lewis: The Abolition Of Man, Christopher Horton Nov 1999

C.S. Lewis: The Abolition Of Man, Christopher Horton

Inklings Forever

In The Abolition of Man, C.S. Lewis calls the natural, moral law of the universe by the name Tao. This essay seeks to define Lewis’s idea of the Tao, demonstrate where the principle of the Tao is reinforced in Lewis’s fictional works, and conclude with Lewis’s ‘prophetical’ warnings to modern humanity’s rebellion against the Tao.


On Moral Grounds: The Art/Science Of Ethics, A. Nicholas Fargnoli Ph.D., Daniel C. Macguire Jan 1991

On Moral Grounds: The Art/Science Of Ethics, A. Nicholas Fargnoli Ph.D., Daniel C. Macguire

Faculty Open-Access Books

From the introduction:

Our age can lay claim to a unique moral chaos. Modernity badgers us with perplexing moral questions: Can good ethics and good business ever coincide? Should medical science do all the things that it now can do? Is truth-telling always a virtue? If it is, how can one maintain professional or personal confidentiality? Is honesty always the best policy? What are the proper criteria for the journalistic media when it comes to reporting the real news and avoiding sensationalism? Should there be an “ethics committee” in government, in business, in hospitals, in law firms, or in financial ...


Moral And Spiritual Values In A High School Anthology Of Literature, Terrence Eugene Kelsay Aug 1960

Moral And Spiritual Values In A High School Anthology Of Literature, Terrence Eugene Kelsay

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

For some years now the need for the emphasis of moral and spiritual values in our public schools has been recognized by the Kentucky Department of Education. The department has given encouragement to numerous research projects and summer workshops held for the purpose of finding an answer to the problem of emphasizing moral and spiritual values in public education. The concern for this need has informally become known as the “Kentucky Movement.”

This study was not undertaken with the thought of introducing new programs in our high schools. The teaching of moral and spiritual values should be done through the ...


A Suggestive Guide For The Development Of Moral & Spiritual Values In Certain Curriculum Areas In The Elementary School, Belle Burks Jul 1956

A Suggestive Guide For The Development Of Moral & Spiritual Values In Certain Curriculum Areas In The Elementary School, Belle Burks

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

Since the beginning of her teaching career, the writer has cherished the hope that the day would come when opportunity and freedom would be given whereby the classroom teacher might saturate her teaching, and that without fear, with those values that exalt and refine the life of each youth that she endeavors to guide. That day has dawned! During recent years seminars, workshops and conferences have been held and the Kentucky program for Moral and Spiritual Education has been recognized as providing a formula which is acceptable to public schools. It is true that spiritual values have always been taught ...