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Full-Text Articles in Religion

From Silence To Golden: The Slow Integration Of Instruments Into Christian Worship, Jonathan M. Lyons Mar 2017

From Silence To Golden: The Slow Integration Of Instruments Into Christian Worship, Jonathan M. Lyons

Musical Offerings

The Christian church’s stance on the use of instruments in sacred music shifted through influences of church leaders, composers, and secular culture. Synthesizing the writings of early church leaders and church historians reveals a clear progression. The early musical practices of the church were connected to the Jewish synagogues. As recorded in the Old Testament, Jewish worship included instruments as assigned by one’s priestly tribe. Eventually, early church leaders rejected that inclusion and developed a rather robust argument against instruments in liturgical worship. The totalitarian stance on musical instruments in sacred worship began to loosen as the organ ...


We Need A Church That's Inside-Out, Heather Josselyn-Cranson Jan 2016

We Need A Church That's Inside-Out, Heather Josselyn-Cranson

Northwestern Review

This hymn gives voice to one frustration that many Christians feel: a despair over watching Christian factions argue about doctrine while the poor suffer outside of church walls. This hymn calls us to see the self-obsession which prevents us from attending to those in need (first stanza), confess our neglect of Jesus' mandate to care for others (second stanza), and turn away from the distractions of petty bickering toward the expression of Christ's peace, grace, and love to all those outside the church (third stanza).


Hymn Lining: A Black Church Tradition With Roots In Europe, Cheryl A. Sampson Jan 2015

Hymn Lining: A Black Church Tradition With Roots In Europe, Cheryl A. Sampson

The Spectrum: A Scholars Day Journal

This paper attempts to explore the history of the sacred form of singing known as hymn-lining and to contribute to the debate surrounding its origin and influences on American music. Until recently, the segregation of our churches after emancipation made it very easy to forget that a tradition of the Black church was also a part of White churches as well. Hymn-lining was originally brought to Christians by Protestant churches in England to the colonies as early as the 16th century. At the same time, this sacred music form was also brought to Scotland. What is heard today in ...