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Religion Commons

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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Religion

Addressing Religious And Spiritual Diversity In Graduate Training And Multicultural Education For Professional Psychologists, Rachel E. Crook-Lyon, Timothy B. Smith, Kari A. O’Grady, Kirti Potkar, Dallas R. Jensen, Thomas Golightly Jul 2013

Addressing Religious And Spiritual Diversity In Graduate Training And Multicultural Education For Professional Psychologists, Rachel E. Crook-Lyon, Timothy B. Smith, Kari A. O’Grady, Kirti Potkar, Dallas R. Jensen, Thomas Golightly

Faculty Publications

Professional counselors completed a survey assessing their attitudes regarding inclusion of client spiritual and religious issues into multicultural training and practice. Most respondents agreed that spiritual and religious issues should be included in counselor training and that this content could be integrated successfully into existing instruction regarding multicultural counseling.


The Silent Lesson, John Hilton Iii Jan 2013

The Silent Lesson, John Hilton Iii

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Helping Students Act As A Result Of Classroom Lessons, John Hilton Iii, Brandon B. Gunnell Jan 2011

Helping Students Act As A Result Of Classroom Lessons, John Hilton Iii, Brandon B. Gunnell

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Multiple Intelligences In The Gospel Classroom, John Hilton Iii Jan 2010

Multiple Intelligences In The Gospel Classroom, John Hilton Iii

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Helping Students Ask Questions, John Hilton Iii Jan 2008

Helping Students Ask Questions, John Hilton Iii

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


From The Individual To Individualism: A Critique Of The Helping Professions, Timothy B. Smith, Matthew R. Draper Jan 2003

From The Individual To Individualism: A Critique Of The Helping Professions, Timothy B. Smith, Matthew R. Draper

Faculty Publications

Individualistic values characterize contemporary society and many popular approaches to mental health treatment. This paper critiques the individualistic values embedded in the helping professions that implicitly contradict the teachings ofJesus Christ, the surest foundation for mental health interventions. Members of AMCAP are encouraged to search out and replace problematic values that contradict gospel teachings which have been integrated into contemporary mental health practice.