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Full-Text Articles in Religion

An Investigation Of The Relationship Between Prince ShōToku’S ShōMangyō-Gisho And Two Dunhuang Buddhist Manuscripts: A Debate Over Originality And Canonical Value, Mark Dennis Jan 2019

An Investigation Of The Relationship Between Prince ShōToku’S ShōMangyō-Gisho And Two Dunhuang Buddhist Manuscripts: A Debate Over Originality And Canonical Value, Mark Dennis

Manuscript Studies

This article investigates the relationship between two manuscript fragments discovered in Dunhuang, China referred to as Nai 93 and Tama 24, and the Shōmangyō-gisho, a Buddhist text written in classical Chinese attributed to Japan’s Prince Shōtoku (574-622). Shōtoku is remembered in Japanese history as the country’s first patriarch of Buddhism, revered for his patronage of the nascent faith and his great erudition. His studies under a Korean Buddhist monk led, according to early historical texts, to his composing the Shōmangyō-gisho and two other Buddhist commentaries that have been greatly valued throughout Japanese Buddhist history.

But the discovery of ...


A "Loochooan" New Testament, Michael P. Williams Aug 2014

A "Loochooan" New Testament, Michael P. Williams

Unique at Penn

Essay on the history and bibliography of four books of the New Testament (including two editions of the Gospel of Luke) translated by evangelist Bernard Jean Bettelheim into Japanese/Ryukyuan, and published in Hong Kong, 1855-1858. Provides context on Bettelheim's role in Okinawan history as well as his knowledge of the languages spoken on Okinawa in the mid-1800s.


Remembrance, Emulation, Imagination: The Chinese And Chinese American Catholic Ancestor Memorial Service, Beverly Joan Butcher Jan 1994

Remembrance, Emulation, Imagination: The Chinese And Chinese American Catholic Ancestor Memorial Service, Beverly Joan Butcher

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The Chinese Rites Controversy, which began in seventeenth century China and largely concerned disagreement amongst Catholic missionary orders as to whether or not participation in ancestor veneration and Confucian rituals should be permitted by the Church, concluded in 1742 with the bull Ex quo singulari which ruled against Catholics taking part in these rites. However, the Church rescinded this decision in 1939 when Plane compertum est allowed such participation by Catholics of Chinese ancestry. Subsequently, in 1974 the Chinese Bishops' Conference in Taipei, Taiwan approved the "Proposed Catholic Ancestor Memorial Liturgy" in which ancestor veneration became an integral part of ...