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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Who’S Your Mammy?: Figuring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku May 2007

Who’S Your Mammy?: Figuring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

In existence for over a century, the advertising icon Aunt Jemima remains a point of contention for many African Americans, despite a recent makeover that attempted to remove visual signifiers of slavery. To understand the icon's negativity, I explore its roots in slavery,the minstrel stage and The Exhibition of the Other. I then move to an analysis of "The Legend of Aunt Jemima," a series of advertisements produced in the 1920s, to determine how racism was manifested in the icon*s promotional materials.


Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku May 2007

Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

In existence since the late 1890s, advertising icon Aunt Jemima has been indelibly etched into the American memory—virtually unchanged from her debut until her makeover in 1989. Before this recent transformation, Aunt Jemima was the quintessential embodiment of the mammy stereotype—a heavyset black woman, complete with apron and bandana. Her creation was situated at the locus of several racist traditions and discourses directed towards African Americans—the mammy stereotype, the minstrel show, The Myth of the Old South, and the Exhibition of the Other. This embodiment of multiple racist practices helps to explain how the mammy in general ...


Pollution And Hybridity: Cultural Collision In Masami Teraoka's Mcdonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan (1974–5), Harrison W. Inefuku Apr 2007

Pollution And Hybridity: Cultural Collision In Masami Teraoka's Mcdonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan (1974–5), Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

Japanese-born artist Masami Teraoka immigrated to the United States in the 1960s, in the midst of a burgeoning post-war mass consumer society. During a visit to Vancouver, the artist was struck by the Golden Arches of McDonald's looming over the city and was prompted to create his series, McDonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan (1974-5), which shows the impact of the American multinational corporation on a post-World War II Japan. Completed in watercolor to resemble ukiyo-e woodblock prints, Teraoka shows the permeability of the boundaries between East and West. In my analysis of the series, I build on concepts of ...


Pollution In Inner And Outer Spaces: Masami Teraoka's Mcdonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan, 1974–5, Harrison W. Inefuku Apr 2007

Pollution In Inner And Outer Spaces: Masami Teraoka's Mcdonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan, 1974–5, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

Japanese-born artist Masami Teraoka arrived in the United States in the 1960s, in the midst of a burgeoning post-war mass consumer society. During a visit to Vancouver, the artist was struck by the Golden Arches of McDonald's looming over the city as a portent of a global takeover by the company. This awareness prompted his series, McDonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan (1974-5), which depicts an old, traditional Japanese culture coming into contact with a new, modern American one with results that are at times humorous, and at others, chaotic. Completed in watercolor to resemble ukiyo-e woodblock prints, Teraoka masterfully ...


Review Of Cultural Representation In Native America, Christina Gish Berndt Jan 2007

Review Of Cultural Representation In Native America, Christina Gish Berndt

Christina Gish Hill

What do Barbie, beer, nuclear bombs, New Age shamans, and Creole identity have in common? The authors of this anthology address each of these topics to illuminate cultural representation both of and by American Indian communities. This collection consists of articles from scholars and community activists that draw on provocative contemporary issues to suggest new directions for the study of cultural representation...


Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier Jan 2005

Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier

Jane E. Dusselier

"Artful Identifications" offers three meanings of internment art. First, internees remade locations of imprisonment into livable places of survival. Inside places were remade as internees responded to degraded living conditions by creating furniture with discarded apple crates, cardboard, tree branches and stumps, scrap pieces of wood left behind by government carpenters, and wood lifted from guarded lumber piles. Having addressed the material conditions of their living units, internees turned their attention to aesthetic matters by creating needle crafts, wood carvings, ikebana, paintings, shell art, and kobu. Dramatic changes to outside spaces of "assembly centers" and concentration camps were also critical ...


Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost Jan 2005

Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost

Bambi L Yost

Abstrat is not available. Citation: Homegirls in the Public Sphere by Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review by: Yost, Bambi Children, Youth and Environments Vol. 15, No. 1, Environmental Health, and Other Papers (2005) , pp. 406-413 Published by: The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado, a body corporate, for the benefit of the Children, Youth and Environments Center at the University of Colorado Boulder Stable URL: http://0-www.jstor.org.library.simmons.edu/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.15.1.0406


Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken Oct 2004

Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In Only One Place of Redress, David Bernstein contends that between 1890 and 1937 American courts aided black workers in labor disputes. The court did this by upholding the freedom of contract doctrine enshrined in Lochner v. New York, the 1905 case that invalidated legislation limiting the hours a baker could work. "Lochnerism" or "Lochnerian jurisprudence," as Bernstein calls it, benefited blacks by voiding discriminatory labor laws, and he illuminates how these labor regulations harmed African Americans. "The Supreme Court," he writes, "was relatively sympathetic to plaintiffs who challenged government regulations, especially occupational regulations, as violations of the implicit constitutional ...


Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken Apr 2004

Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In this provocative new book, David Chappell examines the role of religion and religious thought in the Civil Rights movement. By focusing on the intellectual and religious underpinnings of both the activists and their segregationist rivals, he makes a persuasive argument that the struggle should best be understood as a prophetic religious movement, rather than as a social movement or as the triumph of a liberal consensus. Scrutinizing religion allows Chappell to shift the historiographical debate away from protests and violence to the role of ideas, principles, and faith.


‘Contrary To Our Way Of Thinking’: The Struggle For An American Indian Center In Chicago, Grant Arndt Jan 1998

‘Contrary To Our Way Of Thinking’: The Struggle For An American Indian Center In Chicago, Grant Arndt

Grant Arndt

When Chicago’s American Indian Center opened in 1953, it had a small core of dedicated leaders, but little support in the city. The Center’s board of directors had applied for funding to Chicago’s Metropolitan Welfare Council, the main clearing- house of philanthropic funding in the city, only to be told that the Center’s existence was “contrary to our way of thinking.” 1 It was not the first time that Native Americans seeking to cre- ate urban organizations had encountered rejection. For years, local Native American activists had found that urban Indians and Native American urban organizations ...


Minorities In Hospitality Management, Robert H. Bosselman Jan 1994

Minorities In Hospitality Management, Robert H. Bosselman

Robert H. Bosselman

Although diversity in hospitality management benefits from business open-door policies and managerial development programs, it will be necessary for educational programs to go well beyond their traditional recruitment and retention programs to help minorities pursue opportunities in the hospitality field. This article reviews minority participation in the field and proposes some strategies for success.