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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

A Recipe For Black Girl Magic: A Critical Study Of The Mise-En-Scene In Beyoncé’S Visual Album Lemonade As A Radical Representation Of Black Women, Tatiyana Jenkins May 2017

A Recipe For Black Girl Magic: A Critical Study Of The Mise-En-Scene In Beyoncé’S Visual Album Lemonade As A Radical Representation Of Black Women, Tatiyana Jenkins

Lawrence University Honors Projects

Lemonade, a visual album released by pop icon Beyoncé Knowles Carter in 2016, crafts a mise-en-scene that redefines the way that black women are allowed to feel and exist in media culture. Contrary to the negative stereotypes and misrepresentations perpetuated in media, Lemonade is a radical attempt to provide audiences with an alternative representation of the experiences of black women. For this honors project, I address the controversy surrounding the visual album’s radical representations of black womanhood. To inform my understanding of the visual album I examine the various creative contributions such as the film Daughters of the Dust ...


La Nouvelle-Orléans : Une Ville Créole, Torrey Smith Jan 2016

La Nouvelle-Orléans : Une Ville Créole, Torrey Smith

Richard A. Harrison Symposium

Using the author’s experience this past summer living in New Orleans and working at l’Alliance Française de la Nouvelle-Orléans (a French cultural center in town) as a jumping-off point, this essay explores the birth and evolution of the city under French colonization. During her two-month stay, the author observed that l’Alliance seemed to attract mainly wealthier, white New Orleans residents; this limited interest seemed strange not only considering the incredible racial and socioeconomic diversity of the city, but also given that New Orleans’ French heritage seemed prevalent in the physical and cultural structure of the city.

To ...


The Irish Experience: Identity And Authenticity In Irish Traditional Music, Elizabeth Graber Mar 2015

The Irish Experience: Identity And Authenticity In Irish Traditional Music, Elizabeth Graber

Lawrence University Honors Projects

Over the last century, Irish traditional music, or “trad,” has become a global phenomenon that has flourished in communities from the United States of America to Japan. A musician need not be Irish in heritage to play and do justice to Irish traditional music or to feel a strong emotional connection to it; yet ethnic ties, real and imagined, constitute a powerful reason to play. The music is inextricably linked with the poetically-titled Emerald Isle even if its musicians are not. In this project, I explore and analyze the many facets of perception of and participation in Irish traditional music ...


Shtetl, Franklin I. Lieberman Jun 2014

Shtetl, Franklin I. Lieberman

Lawrence University Honors Projects

Shtetl looks at the Jewish community as a whole by focusing on the individuals within it. Jews are an incredibly diverse people. They come from all walks of life and racial backgrounds. Contrary to popular belief, there is no stereotypical Jewish person. Not all Jews are rich, nor do they all have curly dark hair and big noses. By being forced to look at the individuals within the community together, it becomes clear that while all of these individuals are Jewish, and therefore bound to each other because of it, they are all different and break this stereotypical mold.


Whence Comes Black Art?: The Construction And Application Of “Black Motivation”, Derrell Acon Jan 2011

Whence Comes Black Art?: The Construction And Application Of “Black Motivation”, Derrell Acon

Lawrence University Honors Projects

George Schuyler, in his tragically misguided 1926 essay for The Nation magazine, “The Negro-Art Hokum,” suggests that the only difference between Blacks and Whites is the color of skin, and that both races experience the same social, psychological and educational forces in America. He blatantly disregards American racism and inequality, and in his attempt to put forth his advocacy of color-blindness he merely projects and perpetuates the most racist of ideals within our country. Schuyler views the concept of Black Art very narrowly and insists on the impossibility of such an idea because of the supposed Americanness of the art ...