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Articles 61 - 78 of 78

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

'Roots Run Deep Here': The Construction Of Black New Orleans In Post-Katrina Tourism Narratives, Lynnell L. Thomas Sep 2009

'Roots Run Deep Here': The Construction Of Black New Orleans In Post-Katrina Tourism Narratives, Lynnell L. Thomas

American Studies Faculty Publication Series

This article explores the emergent post-Katrina tourism narrative and its ambivalent racialization of the city. Tourism officials are compelled to acknowledge a New Orleans outside the traditional tourist boundaries – primarily black, often poor, and still largely neglected by the city and national governments. On the other hand, tourism promoters do not relinquish (and do not allow tourists to relinquish) the myths of racial exoticism and white supremacist desire for a construction of blacks as artistically talented but socially inferior.


“'Roots Run Deep Here': The Construction Of Black New Orleans In Post-Katrina Tourism Narratives", Lynnell L. Thomas Aug 2009

“'Roots Run Deep Here': The Construction Of Black New Orleans In Post-Katrina Tourism Narratives", Lynnell L. Thomas

Lynnell Thomas

This article explores the emergent post-Katrina tourism narrative and its ambivalent racialization of the city. Tourism officials are compelled to acknowledge a New Orleans outside the traditional tourist boundaries – primarily black, often poor, and still largely neglected by the city and national governments. On the other hand, tourism promoters do not relinquish (and do not allow tourists to relinquish) the myths of racial exoticism and white supremacist desire for a construction of blacks as artistically talented but socially inferior.


Role And Impact Of Intellectual Factor In The 18th-20th Centuries' European Conception Of 'Jews As Jews': A Revisitation, Rabson Wuriga Mar 2009

Role And Impact Of Intellectual Factor In The 18th-20th Centuries' European Conception Of 'Jews As Jews': A Revisitation, Rabson Wuriga

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

The paper advances an argument that European intellectual community played a role that influenced attitudes and policies of anti-Semitic conception of Jews as Jews. It goes on to explore various ideas propounded by some famous thinkers and scientists that dominated the 18th-20th centuries Europe: such as classification of races, systematic and mathematical order of things, rights of man, categorization of races, autonomous reason, metaphysics of eating, etc. The paper also argues that European conception of Jews exerted pressure intended to cause assimilation of Jews into host-nations. Consequently, European Jewry conceded to this pressure and was imbibed into European racial fantasies ...


Racing Jesse Jackson: Leadership, Masculinity, And The Black Presidency, Paul Achter Jan 2009

Racing Jesse Jackson: Leadership, Masculinity, And The Black Presidency, Paul Achter

Rhetoric and Communication Studies Faculty Publications

In June of 1983, the New York Times published a survey revealing that nearly one in five white voters would not vote for a black candidate for president, even if that candidate was qualified and was the party nominee.2 For some readers, such a revelation might have induced shock or even outrage; for others the poll would merely reflect an obvious and ugly reality. The survey was prompted by the Rev. Jesse Jackson’s attempt to become the first black, Democratic nominee for president.

A news story exploring the prevalence of white racism in the United States was not ...


Conscience Of A Black Conservative: The 1964 Election And The Rise Of The National Negro Republican Assembly, Leah M. Wright Jan 2009

Conscience Of A Black Conservative: The 1964 Election And The Rise Of The National Negro Republican Assembly, Leah M. Wright

Division II Faculty Publications

This article explores the activities of black Republicans during and after the 1964 Republican National Convention. The social turmoil of the 1960s, along with the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and Barry Goldwater’s selection as the GOP’s presidential nominee resulted in an unprecedented massive rejection of the Republican Party by 94 percent of the black electorate. This “6 Percent” moment forced black Republicans to rethink their relationship to the GOP. In turn, this redefinition served as a catalyst for the galvanization of liberal and moderate black party members, who then worked to promote a civil rights ...


Exile On 125th Street: African-Americans, Germans, And Jews In Moon Over Harlem, Jonathan Skolnik Dec 2008

Exile On 125th Street: African-Americans, Germans, And Jews In Moon Over Harlem, Jonathan Skolnik

Jonathan Skolnik

An analysis of the film Moon Over Harlem (Dir. Edgar G. Ulmer, 1939) focusing on issues of German-Jewish exile from Nazi Germany and race in American culture and society.


Race, Empire And Liberalism: Interpreting John Crawfurd’S History Of The Indian Archipelago, Gareth Knapman Dec 2007

Race, Empire And Liberalism: Interpreting John Crawfurd’S History Of The Indian Archipelago, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

No abstract provided.


“‘The City I Used To...Visit’: Tourist New Orleans And The Racialized Response To Hurricane Katrina”, Lynnell Thomas Dec 2006

“‘The City I Used To...Visit’: Tourist New Orleans And The Racialized Response To Hurricane Katrina”, Lynnell Thomas

Lynnell Thomas

This article explores the connections between New Orleans’s late 20th-century tourism representations and the mainstream media coverage and national images of the city immediately following Hurricane Katrina. It pays particular attention to the ways that race and class are employed in both instances to create and perpetuate a distorted sense of place that ignore the historical and contemporary realities of the city’s African American population.


Black, Mulatto And Light Skin: Reinterpreting Race, Ethnicity And Class In Caribbean Diasporic Communities, Marc E. Prou Dec 2003

Black, Mulatto And Light Skin: Reinterpreting Race, Ethnicity And Class In Caribbean Diasporic Communities, Marc E. Prou

Marc E. Prou

In recent years, Caribbeanists of different academic specialization and intellectual orientation have demonstrated a renewed interest in the unholy trinity of race, class and ethnic matters. the renewed interest has reflected a continued, but rather an unsystematic attempt to account for the social characteristics of race, ethnicity, gender and class among Caribbean people, both at home and abroad. The current ethnic power relationships manisfested by the unequal distribution of wealth in Caribbean diasporic communities is the direct result of colonialist influence on race through exploitative practices of the plantocracy and selective immigration to create a Caribbean middle class.


Making The "Birthplace Of Jazz": Tourism And Musical Heritage Marketing In New Orleans, J. Souther Jan 2003

Making The "Birthplace Of Jazz": Tourism And Musical Heritage Marketing In New Orleans, J. Souther

History Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Making The "Birthplace Of Jazz": Tourism And Musical Heritage Marketing In New Orleans, J. Mark Souther Dec 2002

Making The "Birthplace Of Jazz": Tourism And Musical Heritage Marketing In New Orleans, J. Mark Souther

J. Mark Souther

No abstract provided.


Deadweight Costs And Intrinsic Wrongs Of Nativism: Economics, Freedom, And Legal Suppression Of Spanish, William W. Bratton, Drucilla L. Cornell Jan 1999

Deadweight Costs And Intrinsic Wrongs Of Nativism: Economics, Freedom, And Legal Suppression Of Spanish, William W. Bratton, Drucilla L. Cornell

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


When The North Is The South: Life In The Netherlands, Edward L. Ayers Jan 1998

When The North Is The South: Life In The Netherlands, Edward L. Ayers

History Faculty Publications

After years of watching colleagues fly to Paris, Johannesburg, Beijing, or Bogota for research trips and speaking engagements, I decided to apply for a posting abroad. Holding only the vaguest and most stereotyped visions, I chose the Netherlands. My application stressed, perhaps impolitely, the direct Dutch involvement in the slave trade and their indirect connection to South African apartheid. Such commonalities with white southerners, I suggested, might serve as the basis for interesting discussions of race and region.


The Little Rock Crisis And Foreign Affairs: Race, Resistance, And The Image Of American Democracy, Mary L. Dudziak Sep 1997

The Little Rock Crisis And Foreign Affairs: Race, Resistance, And The Image Of American Democracy, Mary L. Dudziak

Mary L. Dudziak

When President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent federal troops to Little Rock, Arkansas to enforce a school desegregation order at Central High School in the fall of 1957, more than racial equality was at issue. The image of American democracy was at stake. The Little Rock crisis played out on a world stage, as news media around the world covered the crisis. During the weeks of impasse leading up to Eisenhower's dramatic intervention, foreign critics questioned how the United States could argue that its democratic system of government was a model for others to follow when racial segregation was tolerated ...


The Changing Significance Of Race For People Of Color, Juanita Tamayo Lott Sep 1993

The Changing Significance Of Race For People Of Color, Juanita Tamayo Lott

Trotter Review

For more than two hundred years, race in the United States has been viewed as a black/white issue. Blacks have been defined not as a people unto themselves, but only in relationship to whites. This relationship is one of power with blacks as a “minority subordinate” group and whites as a “majority dominant” group. Other people of color—whether indigenous to the Americas, settlers who predated Western Europeans, nonwhite settlers with several generations of U.S.-born residents, or newly arrived immigrants and refugees—have been primarily defined as nonexistent. When other people of color have been recognized, it ...


Miscegenation And Acculturation In The Narragansett Country Of Rhode Island, 1710-1790, Rhett S. Jones Jan 1989

Miscegenation And Acculturation In The Narragansett Country Of Rhode Island, 1710-1790, Rhett S. Jones

Trotter Review

The histories of most New England states view blacks as a strange, foreign people enslaved in southern states, whom New Englanders rescued first by forming colonization and abolitionist societies and later by fighting a Civil War to free them. The existence of a black population in New England as early as the seventeenth century has been pretty much ignored. Indeed Anderson and Marten, of the Parting Ways Museum of Afro-American Ethnohistory, touched off a furor with their discovery that Abraham Pearse, one of the early residents of Plymouth Colony, was black.

The long neglect of New England’s black history ...


Race And Capital Punishment, Michael L. Radelet Sep 1987

Race And Capital Punishment, Michael L. Radelet

Trotter Review

Whether it be lynching or legally-imposed capital punishment, the threat or use of death as a punishment has been a powerful means of class and race intimidation throughout American history. In the nineteenth century, statutes that explicitly considered race were not uncommon; in Virginia, for example, the statutes of 150 years ago listed five capital crimes for whites and 70 for black slaves. Today, historians interested in capital punishment use records of state compensations to slave owners to learn how many slaves were executed.


T. Thomas Fortune: Land, Labor And Politics In The South, 1883-1886, C. Edward Shacklee Jan 1976

T. Thomas Fortune: Land, Labor And Politics In The South, 1883-1886, C. Edward Shacklee

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

This paper will deal with Fortune's economic ideology between 1883 and 1886, early years in a career that would span four decades. It is an attempt to show both the reformist and traditional approaches applied to the problems of his race, approaches that foreshadowed much of black though in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.