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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Supporting Caste: The Origins Of Racism In Colonial Virginia, Patrick D. Anderson Dec 2012

Supporting Caste: The Origins Of Racism In Colonial Virginia, Patrick D. Anderson

Grand Valley Journal of History

In 17th century Virginia, lower class whites and blacks coordinated on multiple occasions to resist the power of the ruling class elites. By the late 19th century, white laborers viewed the newly freed slaves through racist precepts and the two groups clashed on a regular basis. The aim of this essay is to explain how the shift from racial solidarity to racial antagonism occurred. Racist ideology originated in the minds of the elites and they attempted to separate the restless lower class along racial lines, first, by legal reforms, second, by creating a separate class of enslaved blacks. Anti-black racism ...


Cornering The Black Market: A Role For The Corner Store In Community Development, Seneca Vaught Sep 2012

Cornering The Black Market: A Role For The Corner Store In Community Development, Seneca Vaught

Seneca Vaught

This paper addresses these important themes by examining the impact of corner stores in two American cities: Buffalo, New York and Atlanta, Georgia. The paper illustrates how corner stores can effectively address unique demands in urban niche markets and the problems and possibilities these approaches present. The paper puts these developments into a historical, economic and spatial context that illustrates how neighborhood stores emerge and the dynamics of race, economics, and geography that they engage. Finally, the paper illustrates several models for effective small propriety grocers that specifically address issues of economic disparity and racial divisions, illustrating how these examples ...


Whose Britain Is This Anyway: Questioning Race, Class, Immigration And Nationality In Great Britain Between 1948 And 2011, Christina Jayne Cruce Jan 2012

Whose Britain Is This Anyway: Questioning Race, Class, Immigration And Nationality In Great Britain Between 1948 And 2011, Christina Jayne Cruce

Senior Independent Study Theses

This work discusses how questions of race, class, immigration and nationality have changed since 1948. To answer it I looked at the 1981 Brixton race riot and the 2011 UK urban youth riots. I argue that, despite improvements in black and white race relations, British society has continued to discriminate against black-Brits on multiple levels. I have also found that since the 1980s there has been a governmental and, more generally, a societal neglect of the working-class population as a whole. In regards to the findings of other scholars and historians, my work looks at both urban, poor blacks and ...