Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History

2011

Series

Institution
Keyword
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 37

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

From Philosopher To Cultural Icon: Reflections On Hu Mei's "Confucius" (2010), Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, Ronald K. Frank, Renqiu Yu, Bing Xu Dec 2011

From Philosopher To Cultural Icon: Reflections On Hu Mei's "Confucius" (2010), Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, Ronald K. Frank, Renqiu Yu, Bing Xu

Global Asia Journal

No abstract provided.


Aliens In Their Native Lands: The Persistence Of Internal Colonial Theory, John R. Chávez Dec 2011

Aliens In Their Native Lands: The Persistence Of Internal Colonial Theory, John R. Chávez

History Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Review Of Red Power Rising: The National Indian Youth Council And The Origins Of Native Activism. By Bradley G. Shreve. Foreword By Shirley Hill Witt, Bruce E. Johansen Oct 2011

Review Of Red Power Rising: The National Indian Youth Council And The Origins Of Native Activism. By Bradley G. Shreve. Foreword By Shirley Hill Witt, Bruce E. Johansen

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

While many histories of the "Red Power" movement trace its origins to the founding of the American Indian Movement in Minneapolis during 1968 and the occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay a year later, Bradley G. Shreve offers a compelling case that youth activism began during the 1950s, most notably in the Southwest. The Kiva Club (University of New Mexico), the Tribe of Many Feathers (Brigham Young University), and the Sequoyah Club of Oklahoma, among others, joined into the Regional Indian Youth Council in 1959 and the National Indian Youth Council in 1961. In contrast to AIM, which ...


Review Of Light From Ancient Campfires: Archaeological Evidence For Native Lifeways On The Northern Plains. By Trevor R. Peck., Matthew Boyd Oct 2011

Review Of Light From Ancient Campfires: Archaeological Evidence For Native Lifeways On The Northern Plains. By Trevor R. Peck., Matthew Boyd

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Despite the relatively long legacy of professional archaeological research in the northern Great Plains, few comprehensive syntheses of the region's 13,000- year human history have been produced in recent years. This is particularly the case for the Canadian side of the region, which has tended to be overlooked in most scholarly summaries of Great Plains prehistory. The shadowy nature of the Canadian prairies to the wider community of Plains archaeologists is not due to a lack of archaeological research in the region-Alberta, alone, has over 35,000 registered sites-but instead reflects the poor dissemination ofCRM (Culture Resource Management ...


Onyekwuluje, Anne B. (Sc 2473), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2011

Onyekwuluje, Anne B. (Sc 2473), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2473. Interviews conducted by Anne B. Onyekwuluje with seven individuals about the life and influence of Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers, the first woman elected to the Kentucky state Senate in 1963. They discuss their political relationships with Powers and her influence in politics and the Civil Rights movement.


Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 2), John M. Rudy Jul 2011

Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 2), John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

A few weeks ago, the Hanover Evening Sun ran an article on the Lincoln Cemetery in Gettysburg and the locks which hang on its gates. This is by no means a new item of interest. The locks have girded the gates of the cemetery for three years. Still, the article (no longer on the Evening Sun's website but archived here in a PDF) raises a few interesting questions about the delicate balance between preservation and interpretation. [excerpt]


Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy Jun 2011

Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

The African-American Civil War Memorial has been a favorite site of mine in DC (and not simply because it's just down the block from the District's best restaurant, Ben's Chili Bowl). It is a monument in the right setting. Instead of being on the mall with the rest of the other monuments, to be easily overlooked like the DC World War I memorial or similar sidelights to the big three of Lincoln, Washington and Vietnam, the African American Civil War Memorial is in a community that can be moved by it. [excerpt]


“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale Jun 2011

“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

History Faculty Research

In June of 1783, Spain’s newly-appointed Governor of Louisiana Estevan Miro convened a conference of southeastern Indians in Pensacola with representatives from the dominant regional Amerindian groups, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Creeks in attendance. Among the attendees at the West Florida congress was a small contingent of Chickamauga Cherokee, led by their principal chief Dragging Canoe. During the parlay, Governor Miro implored the Indians to “not be afraid of the Americans,” promised to provide guns and ammunition in their ongoing efforts to prevent the further loss of their lands, and urged them to “continue to fight against American ...


Pace 9/11 Oral History Project, Maria T. Iacullo-Bird (Principal Investigator), Ellen Sowchek (Co-Principal Investigator), Jennifer Thomas (Co-Principal Investigator) Jun 2011

Pace 9/11 Oral History Project, Maria T. Iacullo-Bird (Principal Investigator), Ellen Sowchek (Co-Principal Investigator), Jennifer Thomas (Co-Principal Investigator)

Cornerstone 2 Reports : Community Outreach and Empowerment Through Service Learning and Volunteerism

No abstract provided.


‘Unkle Sommerset's’ Freedom: Liberty In England For Black Sailors, Charles R. Foy May 2011

‘Unkle Sommerset's’ Freedom: Liberty In England For Black Sailors, Charles R. Foy

Faculty Research & Creative Activity

With his 1772 decree in Somerset v. Steuart that slavery was ‘so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it [in England] but positive law’, Lord Mansfield altered the legal landscape regarding black rights in England. While earlier judicial decisions had implied that slaves who came to England were free, prior to the Somerset decision there was no judicial consensus on the issue. The Somerset decision did not decree that slavery was illegal in England. Yet many blacks believed it ‘emancipated’ any slave who reached the shores of England. This understanding, combined with the British military welcoming runaways into ...


Misogyny And The Money, Leah Stevenson Apr 2011

Misogyny And The Money, Leah Stevenson

2011 Awards for Excellence in Student Research & Creative Activity - Documents

View Ms. Stevenson's Painting.

In the late 90's hip-hop started as a form of encouragement and empowerment for black people who struggled when growing up. Hip Hop gave black people a voice, where their opinions and challenges could be heard throughout the world. Today the genre of Hip-hop music has developed into a negative image that degrades women and negatively influences the younger black community. Think about some of the hip-hop music at the top of the charts; the songs that disrespect woman, and contains far too much explicit content that it has society desensitized. The pervasiveness of ...


Holstein, Otto (Sc 2433), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2011

Holstein, Otto (Sc 2433), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2433. Memorandum, 1 September 1917, to Brigade Commander of 1st Brigade, Kentucky Infantry from Otto Holstein, Captain, Signal Corps, and Provost Marshall of Lexington, Kentucky, reporting on an altercation between military police officers and African Americans. Includes a newspaper clipping about the incident.


Review Of The Seminole Nation Of Oklahoma: A Legal History. By L. Susan Work. Foreword By Lindsay G. Robertson., Andrew K. Frank Apr 2011

Review Of The Seminole Nation Of Oklahoma: A Legal History. By L. Susan Work. Foreword By Lindsay G. Robertson., Andrew K. Frank

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

In this fascinating and well-documented account, L. Susan Work illustrates how a myriad of federal laws and legal rulings limited tribal self-government and otherwise sought to dissolve the modern Seminole Nation. Along the way, the former attorney general of the Seminole Nation and a member of the Choctaw Nation explores the legal peculiarities of Seminole history and the ways that the federal government frequently chose to homogenize the Five Tribes into a single legal standard. Dissolution, of course, did not occur, and Work carefully reconstructs the process by which the Seminole Nation capitalized on changes in federal policies and various ...


Cotter, Joseph Seaman, 1861-1949 (Sc 378), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Mar 2011

Cotter, Joseph Seaman, 1861-1949 (Sc 378), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and scan (Click on "additional files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 378. Letter, from Joseph S. Cotter, Louisville, Kentucky, to James Tandy Ellis, a fellow poet, which relates an incident of Cotter’s early life.


"Go In De Wilderness": Evading The "Eyes Of Others" In The Slave Songs, Erik Nielson Mar 2011

"Go In De Wilderness": Evading The "Eyes Of Others" In The Slave Songs, Erik Nielson

School of Professional and Continuing Studies Faculty Publications

This essay explores the trope of the wilderness in the slave spirituals, arguing that it functions to recreate symbolically the natural landscape into which slaves regularly took refuge in order to elude white surveillance. Drawing on a variety of sources, it considers the unique surveillance culture in the antebellum South, its effect on the everyday lives of the slaves, and the ways in which the slaves used their natural surroundings to avoid it. It then uses a close analysis of the song "Go in the Wilderness " as a point of departure for a broader discussion of the way the wilderness ...


The Angel And The Imp: The Duncan Sisters’ Performances Of Race And Gender, Jocelyn Buckner Jan 2011

The Angel And The Imp: The Duncan Sisters’ Performances Of Race And Gender, Jocelyn Buckner

Theatre Faculty Articles and Research

From 1923 to 1959 Vivian and Rosetta Duncan performed the show Topsy and Eva in front of thousands of audiences in the United States and abroad. This essay examines how the Duncan Sisters’ appropriation of blackness through a yin and yang performance of black and white womanhood, their sexualized but ultimately infantilizing routine as young girls, and their take on anarchistic comedy resulted in a particular spin on age, gender, race, and sexuality that reinforced their privilege as white women even while it pushed the boundaries of acceptable femininity in the swiftly shifting American culture of the first half of ...


Personal Reflections On Dr. Martin Luther King’S Legacy, S. Ray Granade Jan 2011

Personal Reflections On Dr. Martin Luther King’S Legacy, S. Ray Granade

Creative Works

No abstract provided.


Church Burnings, Eric S. Yellin Jan 2011

Church Burnings, Eric S. Yellin

History Faculty Publications

On 15 September 1963 a bomb exploded in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. The ensuing fire and death of four little girls placed the violence of white supremacy on the front pages of the nation’s newspapers. It also entered the 16th Street Church into a long history of attacks against houses of worship in the American South. Though churches burn for any number of reasons, including accident and insurance fraud, church arson in southern culture has frequently been associated with a symbolic assault on a community’s core institution.


Whence Comes Black Art?: The Construction And Application Of “Black Motivation”, Derrell Acon Jan 2011

Whence Comes Black Art?: The Construction And Application Of “Black Motivation”, Derrell Acon

Lawrence University Honors Projects

George Schuyler, in his tragically misguided 1926 essay for The Nation magazine, “The Negro-Art Hokum,” suggests that the only difference between Blacks and Whites is the color of skin, and that both races experience the same social, psychological and educational forces in America. He blatantly disregards American racism and inequality, and in his attempt to put forth his advocacy of color-blindness he merely projects and perpetuates the most racist of ideals within our country. Schuyler views the concept of Black Art very narrowly and insists on the impossibility of such an idea because of the supposed Americanness of the art ...


Fur Trade 03: Trade Goods 1, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 03: Trade Goods 1, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 3. Material Culture of the Fur Trade and Cloth and Clothing.


Fur Trade 06: How The Fur Trade Worked, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 06: How The Fur Trade Worked, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 6. Government Regulation, From Montreal to the West, and Movement of Goods and Furs.


Fur Trade 07: Native Peoples And The Fur Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 07: Native Peoples And The Fur Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 7. Shifting Political Alliances and Power, Transformations of Culture, and Religion and Worldview.


Fur Trade 08: New France And The Place Of The Fur Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 08: New France And The Place Of The Fur Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 8. What Was New France?, More than Profits at Stake, and Imperial Rivals.


Fur Trade 10: Fur Trade Myths, Acknowledgements, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 10: Fur Trade Myths, Acknowledgements, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 10. Fur Trade Myths, Fiction vs. Fact.

Acknowledgements: Funding, Contributors, Image Credits, and Special Thanks.


Fur Trade 02: Birchbark Canoes, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 02: Birchbark Canoes, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 2. A Joint Effort, Canoes Got Bigger, Why Birchbark?, and a Valuable and Renewable Resource.


Fur Trade 04: Trade Goods 2, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 04: Trade Goods 2, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 4. Firearms and Metal Goods.


Fur Trade 09: Fur Trade Society, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 09: Fur Trade Society, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 9. Interdependence, Mutual Influences, and Métis and Country Wives.


Fur Trade 05: Getting Around In 17th And 18th Century New France, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 05: Getting Around In 17th And 18th Century New France, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 5. Routes and Transportation and Travels of a Voyageur.


Fur Trade 01: Beaver: Mainstay Of The Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Jan 2011

Fur Trade 01: Beaver: Mainstay Of The Trade, Rachel B. Juen, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Panel 1. Hunting, Hides, and Hats, Environmental Effects, and Why Beaver?


Ua3/1/3 President's Office-Cherry - Scrapbooks, Wku Archives Jan 2011

Ua3/1/3 President's Office-Cherry - Scrapbooks, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Collection Inventories

Scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, articles and publications of interest to WKU President Henry Cherry. These include education religion, state and national politics, prohibition and Western Kentucky University.