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2007

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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Book Information And Talk At Ritz Theatre And Lavilla Museum Oct 2007

Book Information And Talk At Ritz Theatre And Lavilla Museum

Textual material from the Rodney Lawrence Hurst, Sr. Papers

A talk with Rodney Hurst about his new book "It was Never about a Hot dog and a Coke"


Sixty-First U.S. Colored Infantry (Sc 1515), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2007

Sixty-First U.S. Colored Infantry (Sc 1515), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1515. Partial account book containing "General Orders" and "Special Orders" for the 61st U.S. Colored Infantry and the 2nd West Tennessee Infantry of African Descent. Also includes a letter written by Nellie Evans (Nov. 1865) to her cousin Jeff.


Resource Wars In Africa, Jesse Benjamin, Daniel Volman, Martin Murray Sep 2007

Resource Wars In Africa, Jesse Benjamin, Daniel Volman, Martin Murray

Jesse Benjamin

No abstract provided.


Race In Feminism: Critiques Of Bodily Self-Determination In Ida B. Wells And Anna Julia Cooper, Stephanie Athey Sep 2007

Race In Feminism: Critiques Of Bodily Self-Determination In Ida B. Wells And Anna Julia Cooper, Stephanie Athey

Trotter Review

If, as Angela Davis has argued, "the last decade of the nineteenth century was a critical moment in the development of modern racism," the same can be said of the development of modern feminism. Late nineteenth-century feminism, like institutional racism, saw "major institutional supports and ideological justifications" take shape across this period. Organizations of American women, both black and white, were shaping political arguments and crafting activist agendas in a post-Reconstruction America increasingly enamored of hereditary science, prone to lynching, and possessed of a virulent nationalism. This essay takes a historical view of "womanhood," bodily self-determination and well-being, concepts now ...


A Historical Overview Of Poverty Among Blacks In Boston, 1950-1990, Robert C. Hayden Sep 2007

A Historical Overview Of Poverty Among Blacks In Boston, 1950-1990, Robert C. Hayden

Trotter Review

Like most nineteenth-century residents of Boston, blacks worked hard to maintain their homes and families. Even before the Civil War, both enslaved and free blacks in "freedom's birthplace" worked long and arduous hours. Those who migrated to Boston from the South in the 1800s had come to secure higher wages, mobility, and opportunity for themselves and their families. Boston's black population grew from 2,000 in 1850 to 8,125 in 1890, and to 11,591 by 1900. In 1900, 39 percent of black Bostonians were northern-born (New England, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania), and 53 percent ...


Mainstreaming And Integrating The Substance And Spectacle Of Scholar-Baller: A New Game Plan For The Ncaa, Higher Education And Society, Keith Harrison Aug 2007

Mainstreaming And Integrating The Substance And Spectacle Of Scholar-Baller: A New Game Plan For The Ncaa, Higher Education And Society, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

The purpose of this chapter is to theoretically and empirically capture the cultural divide between education and sport and entertainment in American society. The NCAA Academic Reform Movement has evolved from holding individuals accountable to presently monitoring institutions and their retention and graduation success of college student athletes. This movement will require a deeper examination of how culture influences academic attitudes and lifelong learning. Based on empirical data from different methodologies, this chapter proposes that student athletes; especially African American males, are often stereotyped with few strategies to empower their academic and athletic identities. The Scholar-Baller Paradigm is designed to ...


Faculty And Male Student Athletes In Higher Education: Racial Differences In The Environmental Predictors Of Academic Achievement, Keith Harrison Jun 2007

Faculty And Male Student Athletes In Higher Education: Racial Differences In The Environmental Predictors Of Academic Achievement, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

Studies have examined the impact of environmental variables on academic achievement among student athletes in the revenue-generating sports of men’s basketball and football. However, while evidence concerning the positive impact of male student athlete and faculty interaction is virtually unequivocal, we are not certain whether the benefits accruing from particular types of interaction vary across different racial/ethnic groups. This study explores the relationship between male Black and White student athletes and faculty as well as the impact of specific forms of student athlete– faculty interaction on academic achievement. Data are drawn from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program’s ...


New Orleans Unveiled: Fanon And A Reconceptualization Of The Performative, Lynnell Thomas Jun 2007

New Orleans Unveiled: Fanon And A Reconceptualization Of The Performative, Lynnell Thomas

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This article examines Frantz Fanon's "Algeria Unveiled" as a reconceptualization of J. L. Austin's theory of the performative. Austin, whose examples of the performative all assume an equal, if not harmonious, relationship, overlooks instances of incompatibility and inequality. Fanon's post-colonial framework, in contrast, illustrates the markedly different types of intentions, uptake, and conventions which inform the speech act in cases of extreme inequality. In these cases, the powerless and seemingly voiceless use tacitly agreed upon conventions inappropriately to attain what they would not be able to have otherwise. Fanon's notion of the performative is used to ...


The Dual-State Character Of U.S. Coloniality: Notes Toward Decolonization, Steve Martinot Jun 2007

The Dual-State Character Of U.S. Coloniality: Notes Toward Decolonization, Steve Martinot

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

I begin with the story of Jack Johnson, the black prizefighter of the early 20th century who won the heavyweight championship against huge hostility. This introduces the operation of the color line in the U.S., not just as a boundary surrounding white supremacist society, but as the structure of obsessive anti-black populism, whose violence perpetrated against the black community in the U.S. reveals the operation of white racialized identity and its sense of social sanctity and impunity. I examine this white populism as representing a "state" that stands alternate to the Constitutional state. I call a "byelocolonial" state ...


Discovery, Fulfillment, And/Or Betrayal: Frantz Fanon And The Role Of The Intellectual In The Struggle For Freedom, Gary Hicks Jun 2007

Discovery, Fulfillment, And/Or Betrayal: Frantz Fanon And The Role Of The Intellectual In The Struggle For Freedom, Gary Hicks

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

And so welcome to the year 2007, 46 years after Fanon's demise. And welcome to the confusion, I would say a rich and positive confusion, that remains about the expectations of us from those who have given us so much in knowledge of all kinds. And this rich confusion flows largely from a certain fuzziness about "what time it is" historically. A world very different from that of Fanon's post-World War II globe of cold war, mutually assured atomic destruction, and all sorts of national liberation and anti colonial struggles. But let me hastily add, also a world ...


A Dying Hegemony: Resisting Anti-Arab Racism In The U.S., Adam Spanos Jun 2007

A Dying Hegemony: Resisting Anti-Arab Racism In The U.S., Adam Spanos

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

What analytics does Frantz Fanon contribute to the study of racisms? Although political ideologies constitute racism, the latter takes on a life of its own and comes to exist in a reciprocally constitutive relationship with political ideologies. I elaborate on the theory of hegemony developed by Laclau and Mouffe and relate it to the present American context in order to analyze what I take to be a distinct break in American perceptions of Arabs, Middle Easterners, and Muslims and the crystallization of racism against them. Having demonstrated the intimate link between American international power, its supporting ideologies, and the Othering ...


On The Dialectics Of Domestic Colonialism & The Role Of Violence In Liberation: From Fratricide To Suicide, Jemadari Kamara, Tony Menelik Van Der Meer Jun 2007

On The Dialectics Of Domestic Colonialism & The Role Of Violence In Liberation: From Fratricide To Suicide, Jemadari Kamara, Tony Menelik Van Der Meer

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In the development of imperialism unique circumstances occur when colonial-like, structural relationships occur with domestic populations. These circumstances produce internal tensions which become manifest in various forms. Among them are mis-education, crime, and violence. This essay will explore the particular characteristics of these manifestations as they developed within the United States. It will discuss the unique role racism plays in enhancing the contradictions in this society. It will also discuss conceptions of violence in these relationships, how they developed and their implications for twenty first century America.


Fanon And Duboisian Double Consciousness, Marc Black Jun 2007

Fanon And Duboisian Double Consciousness, Marc Black

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Within an American context, W.E.B. DuBois defines double consciousness as blacks being forced to view themselves through white perspectives while maintaining their own selfdefinitions. Works of Frantz Fanon, and other classic writers on colonialism, show evidence that colonized peoples also experience the condition of double consciousness. This similarity of double consciousness between people of color in the U.S. and colonized people historically supports the claim of close connections between racism in the U.S. and colonialism internationally. When double consciousness is unilateral, when it is experienced only by the oppressed, double consciousness is unhealthy. However, when whites ...


Institute For Small Town Studies, Small Town Symposium 2007, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua Apr 2007

Institute For Small Town Studies, Small Town Symposium 2007, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua

Sundiata K Cha-Jua

Symposium on America's First Black Town


Naccs 34th Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Apr 2007

Naccs 34th Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

NACCS Conference Programs

Sociological and Ideological Shifts: Chicana/o Migratory Movements and Immigration Passages
April 4-7, 2007
Fairmont Hotel


Carrie Chapman Catt And The Evolutionary Politics Of Sex And Race, 1885-1940., Kevin S. Amidon Apr 2007

Carrie Chapman Catt And The Evolutionary Politics Of Sex And Race, 1885-1940., Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

On 12 December 1917, Carrie Chapman Catt, a long-time leader of the worldwide woman suffrage movement, wrote to Henry Fairfield Osborn, director of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Catt inquired whether Osborn would sign a petition in support of the pending suffrage amendment which was intended to include the signatures of "1000 men whose names we have chosen on account of quality and influence."' Given Osborn's standing in academic, scientific, and political circles, he was a likely enough figure for Catt to turn to in her strategy of developing and publicizing elite support for the ...


Archaeology, Language, And The African Past, Roger Blench Mar 2007

Archaeology, Language, And The African Past, Roger Blench

African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter

No abstract provided.


A Digital Partnership: Penn Museum And Ojibwe Tribal Historians, Timothy B. Powell, Larry Aitken Feb 2007

A Digital Partnership: Penn Museum And Ojibwe Tribal Historians, Timothy B. Powell, Larry Aitken

Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

In January 2007, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) awarded a grant to the Penn Museum in collaboration with tribal historians and language teachers from the White Earth, Leech Lake, and Fond du Lac bands of the Ojibwe Nation in northern Minnesota. This partnership—entitled Gi Bugadin-a-maa Goom (Ojibwe: “To Sanction, to Give Authority, to Bring to Life”)—offers an exciting glimpse into how digital technology can be utilized to benefit the Museum and Ojibwe communities on equal terms.


Indians In Unexpected Places (Book Review), Jeffrey P. Cain Feb 2007

Indians In Unexpected Places (Book Review), Jeffrey P. Cain

English Faculty Publications

Book review by Jeffrey Cain:

Deloria, Philip J. Indians in Unexpected Places. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004. ISBN: 9780700613441; 9780700614592 (pbk.)


Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould Jan 2007

Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

The ancient tradition of the abrek (bandit) was developed into a political institution during the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth century by Chechen and other Muslim peoples of the Caucasus as a strategy for dealing with the overwhelming military force of Russia's imperial army. During the Soviet period, the abrek became a locus for oppositional politics and arguably influenced the representations of violence and anti-colonial resistance during the recent Chechen Wars. This article is one of the first works of English-language scholarship to historicize this institution. It also marks the beginning of a book project entitled ...


Constructing Indigenousness In The Late Modern World, Robert Cribb, Li Narangoa Jan 2007

Constructing Indigenousness In The Late Modern World, Robert Cribb, Li Narangoa

Robert Cribb

Examines changing meanings of the term 'indigenous" in relation to other ideas that have been valued in various (mainly Western) philosophical system, such as priority, attachment to the land, and technical knowledge.


評陳佳宏著《台灣獨立運動史》, Weider Shu Jan 2007

評陳佳宏著《台灣獨立運動史》, Weider Shu

Weider Shu

No abstract provided.


“The 'Long Movement' As Vampire: Temporal And Spatial Fallacies In Recent Black Freedom Studies.”, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua, Clarence E. Lang Jan 2007

“The 'Long Movement' As Vampire: Temporal And Spatial Fallacies In Recent Black Freedom Studies.”, Sundiata K. Cha-Jua, Clarence E. Lang

Sundiata K Cha-Jua

Over the past three decades, scholarship on postwar African American social movements became a mature, well-rounded area of study with different interpretative schools and conflicting theoretical frameworks.' However, recently, the complexity generated by clashing interpretations has eroded as a new paradigm has become hegemonic. Since the publication of Freedom North by Jeanne F. Theoharis and Komozi Woodard, the "Long Movement" has emerged as the dominant theoretical interpretation of the modem "Civil Rights" and "Black Power" movements. The Long Movement interpretative framework consists of four interrelated conceptualizations that challenge the previous interpretations of black freedom movements. The four propositions are: (1 ...


Investigating The Heart Of A Community: Archaeological Excavations At The African Meeting House, Boston, Massachusetts, David B. Landon, Teresa Dujnic, Kate Descoteaux, Susan Jacobucci, Darios Felix, Marisa Patalano, Ryan Kennedy, Diana Gallagher, Ashley Peles, Jonathan Patton, Heather Trigg, Allison Bain, Cheryl Laroche Jan 2007

Investigating The Heart Of A Community: Archaeological Excavations At The African Meeting House, Boston, Massachusetts, David B. Landon, Teresa Dujnic, Kate Descoteaux, Susan Jacobucci, Darios Felix, Marisa Patalano, Ryan Kennedy, Diana Gallagher, Ashley Peles, Jonathan Patton, Heather Trigg, Allison Bain, Cheryl Laroche

Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research Publications

In collaboration with the Museum of African American History, an archaeological research team from the University of Massachusetts Boston carried out a data recovery excavation at the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. The African Meeting House was a powerful social institution for 19thcentury Boston’s free black community. The site played an important role in the abolition movement, the creation of educational opportunity, and other community action for social and political equality. The Meeting House was originally built in 1806, and renovations in preparation for the 2006 bi-centennial celebration prompted an investigation of areas of the property to be ...


'Remember Me?' The Life And Legacy Of Jean Byers Sampson, University Of Southern Maine, Joseph S. Wood, Abraham J. Peck, Mark Lapping, Margaret Ann Brown Jan 2007

'Remember Me?' The Life And Legacy Of Jean Byers Sampson, University Of Southern Maine, Joseph S. Wood, Abraham J. Peck, Mark Lapping, Margaret Ann Brown

Publications (Annual Event Catalog)

In April 1961, Jean Byers Sampson wrote to the director of branches of the NAACP notifying him that she was involved with establishing a branch in Lewiston-Auburn. Because Jean had worked for the national branch of the NAACP in the late 1940s, she began her letter with a friendly “Remember me?” It is a short, intimate phrase that characterized how Jean worked throughout her life. “‘Remember Me?’ The Life and Legacy of Jean Byers Sampson,” the third annual event of the Sampson Center, is a tribute to how one person’s life changed Maine.


Table of Contents:

The Mosaic of ...


Guide To The Manzanar Collection, 1942-1994, Nancy E. Loe Jan 2007

Guide To The Manzanar Collection, 1942-1994, Nancy E. Loe

Special Collections Finding Aids

Materials relating to the forced relocation to Manzanar, California, of Miriko Nagahama and Honey Mitsuye Toda, including correspondence, photographs, and newspapers, donated in 1981 and 1995.


'The Senator And The Socialite: The True Story Of America's First Black Dynasty,' By Lawrence Otis Graham, Eric S. Yellin Jan 2007

'The Senator And The Socialite: The True Story Of America's First Black Dynasty,' By Lawrence Otis Graham, Eric S. Yellin

History Faculty Publications

Lawrence Otis Graham attempts to tell the important story of the Bruces and their legacy in The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty. Starting his story before the Civil War, Graham follows the “First Black Dynasty” through its ultimate fall from grace in mid-twentieth-century New York City. As with his previous bestseller, Our Kind of People: Inside America’s Black Upper Class (1999), Graham takes on the ambitious task of capturing the meaning and importance of an underappreciated group of American’s.


Immigrant Identities In The Rural Midwest, 1830-1925, Knut Oyangen Jan 2007

Immigrant Identities In The Rural Midwest, 1830-1925, Knut Oyangen

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation is about the dislocation and estrangement of transatlantic migrants to the rural Midwest, and the ways in which they both resisted and participated in their own sociocultural displacement by formulating new identities in unfamiliar contexts.


Currents Of Liberty, Seas Of Change: Black Sailors As Subversive Agents Of Freedom In The Early Republic, Skye Montgomery Jan 2007

Currents Of Liberty, Seas Of Change: Black Sailors As Subversive Agents Of Freedom In The Early Republic, Skye Montgomery

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Years after being kidnapped from his native Ibo village as a young boy, Olaudah Equiano vividly recalled his wonder at seeing a European ship for the first time. Although he failed to realize it at the time, that same ship, and the Atlantic currents it navigated, would shortly transport him and millions of his countrymen to lives of slavery on the far shores of a distant continent. In addition to providing a convenient avenue for the initial transport of slaves, water enabled the development of a trade network linking scattered plantations in the Caribbean to centers of trade in North ...


"The Desired Effect": Pontiac's Rebellion And The Native American Struggle To Survive In Britain's North American Conquest, Joseph D. Gasparro Jan 2007

"The Desired Effect": Pontiac's Rebellion And The Native American Struggle To Survive In Britain's North American Conquest, Joseph D. Gasparro

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Ravaged by war and in debt after its victory in the French and Indian War, Britain was not only recuperating, but rejoicing over the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763. This treaty officially ended the fighting and gave Britain all of the land east of the Mississippi River, formerly owned by the French. The ink on the treaty was barely dry when a new insurgence arose in British occupied North America. Native Americans, dissatisfied after the war with their position as conquered people and not as allies, rebelled collectively against British colonists and forts along the frontier. Before ...