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Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies Commons

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History

Selected Works

Colonialism

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

French Caribbeans In Africa: Diasporic Connections And Colonial Administration, 1880-1939, Veronique Helenon Feb 2011

French Caribbeans In Africa: Diasporic Connections And Colonial Administration, 1880-1939, Veronique Helenon

Veronique Helenon

This is the first book-length study of the French Caribbean presence in Africa, and serves as a unique contribution to the field of African Diaspora and Colonial studies. By using administrative records, newspapers, and interviews, Véronique Hélénon explores the French Caribbean presence in the colonial administration in Africa before World War II. The phenomenon of this colonial administration is an especially productive site for understanding the complex relations established both within the African Diaspora and with the French colonial power.


Race, Empire And Liberalism: Interpreting John Crawfurd’S History Of The Indian Archipelago, Gareth Knapman Dec 2007

Race, Empire And Liberalism: Interpreting John Crawfurd’S History Of The Indian Archipelago, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

No abstract provided.


Orang-Utans, Tribes, And Nations: Degeneracy, Primordialism, And The Chain Of Being, Gareth Knapman Dec 2007

Orang-Utans, Tribes, And Nations: Degeneracy, Primordialism, And The Chain Of Being, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

This article explores how early anthropological writing (1830s and 1840s) on the nation faced the question: How natural was the nation? In exploring development of the nation from the tribe, colonial ethnological writers in Southeast Asia also explored the limits of primordialism. Debates on the humanity of the orang-utan represented the search for these limits. The theme of degeneracy underpinned these connections. Degeneracy was a complex belief that connected the civilized nation to the savage tribe. Two methodologies underpinned this discourse: scientific rationality and imagination. Many contemporary studies focus on how scientific rationality created distance between the colonized and the ...


Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould Jan 2007

Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

The ancient tradition of the abrek (bandit) was developed into a political institution during the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth century by Chechen and other Muslim peoples of the Caucasus as a strategy for dealing with the overwhelming military force of Russia's imperial army. During the Soviet period, the abrek became a locus for oppositional politics and arguably influenced the representations of violence and anti-colonial resistance during the recent Chechen Wars. This article is one of the first works of English-language scholarship to historicize this institution. It also marks the beginning of a book project entitled ...


Behind The Wall Of The Caucasus, Rebecca Gould Jan 2005

Behind The Wall Of The Caucasus, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.