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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken Oct 2004

Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In Only One Place of Redress, David Bernstein contends that between 1890 and 1937 American courts aided black workers in labor disputes. The court did this by upholding the freedom of contract doctrine enshrined in Lochner v. New York, the 1905 case that invalidated legislation limiting the hours a baker could work. "Lochnerism" or "Lochnerian jurisprudence," as Bernstein calls it, benefited blacks by voiding discriminatory labor laws, and he illuminates how these labor regulations harmed African Americans. "The Supreme Court," he writes, "was relatively sympathetic to plaintiffs who challenged government regulations, especially occupational regulations, as violations of the implicit constitutional ...


Obituary Thakor Shah By Amar Jesani & Vibhuti Patel, Professor Vibhuti Patel May 2004

Obituary Thakor Shah By Amar Jesani & Vibhuti Patel, Professor Vibhuti Patel

Professor Vibhuti Patel

At a time when the nation needs people who could keep alive the secular conscience of Gujarat, the passing away of Thakor Shah on April 10, 2004 in Vadodara due to massive heart attack has come as a big jolt. He died while participating in the meeting of the network of social movements in Gujarat. Of the 76 years he lived, he spent over 60 years in public life, making personal sacrifices, fearlessly withstanding all attacks – physical and political – in his incessant struggle for organising working masses for their rights and justice. His life was a political journey in search ...


Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken Apr 2004

Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In this provocative new book, David Chappell examines the role of religion and religious thought in the Civil Rights movement. By focusing on the intellectual and religious underpinnings of both the activists and their segregationist rivals, he makes a persuasive argument that the struggle should best be understood as a prophetic religious movement, rather than as a social movement or as the triumph of a liberal consensus. Scrutinizing religion allows Chappell to shift the historiographical debate away from protests and violence to the role of ideas, principles, and faith.


Labels Of African American Ballers: A Historical Contemporary Investigation Of African American Male Youth's Depletions From America's Favorite Pastime 1885-2000, Keith Harrison Feb 2004

Labels Of African American Ballers: A Historical Contemporary Investigation Of African American Male Youth's Depletions From America's Favorite Pastime 1885-2000, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

No abstract provided.


A Case Study Of Transnationalism: Continuity And Changes In Chinese American Philanthropy To China, Xiao-Huang Yin Dec 2003

A Case Study Of Transnationalism: Continuity And Changes In Chinese American Philanthropy To China, Xiao-Huang Yin

Xiao-huang Yin

No abstract provided.


Female And Male Student Athletes' Perceptions Of Career Transition In Sport And Higher Education: A Visual Elicitation And Qualitative Assessment, C. Keith Harrison Dec 2003

Female And Male Student Athletes' Perceptions Of Career Transition In Sport And Higher Education: A Visual Elicitation And Qualitative Assessment, C. Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

The termination of a collegiate athletic career is inevitable for all student athletes. The purpose of this study was to explore student athletes’ perceptions of the athletic career transition process. One-hundred-andforty- three (n = 143) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II student athletes were administered the Life After Sports Scale (LASS) designed by the authors. The LASS is a 58-item mixed method inventory. The scope of this inquiry explored the qualitative section, which examined participants’ perceptions that were visually primed with a narrative description of a student athlete who made the transition out of collegiate sport successfully. Three major themes ...


College Students' Perceptions, Myths, And Stereotypes About African American Athleticism: A Qualitative Investigation, Keith Harrison Dec 2003

College Students' Perceptions, Myths, And Stereotypes About African American Athleticism: A Qualitative Investigation, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

Examining the ‘natural’ athlete myth and utilizing the recent literature on cultural/social factors in athleticism, this study through survey research examines the myth of the ‘natural’ African American athlete. Participants consist of 301 university students from a large, traditionally White, midwest institution. The primary research question is to determine the attitudes of college students in terms of how they perceive the success of the African American athlete in certain sports. The purpose is to assess participants’ perceptions of the African American athlete and their opinion as to whether or not African American athletes are superior in certain sports (football ...


Black, Mulatto And Light Skin: Reinterpreting Race, Ethnicity And Class In Caribbean Diasporic Communities, Marc E. Prou Dec 2003

Black, Mulatto And Light Skin: Reinterpreting Race, Ethnicity And Class In Caribbean Diasporic Communities, Marc E. Prou

Marc E. Prou

In recent years, Caribbeanists of different academic specialization and intellectual orientation have demonstrated a renewed interest in the unholy trinity of race, class and ethnic matters. the renewed interest has reflected a continued, but rather an unsystematic attempt to account for the social characteristics of race, ethnicity, gender and class among Caribbean people, both at home and abroad. The current ethnic power relationships manisfested by the unequal distribution of wealth in Caribbean diasporic communities is the direct result of colonialist influence on race through exploitative practices of the plantocracy and selective immigration to create a Caribbean middle class.