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Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

“‘A Warlike Demonstration': Legalism, Violent Self-Help And Electoral Politics, In Decatur, Illinois, 1894-1898.”., Sundiata K. Cha-Jua Jul 2000

“‘A Warlike Demonstration': Legalism, Violent Self-Help And Electoral Politics, In Decatur, Illinois, 1894-1898.”., Sundiata K. Cha-Jua

Sundiata K Cha-Jua

This project addresses the limitations of previous lynching research. It explores the racial-class struggle unleashed in Decatur, Illinois, a middle-sized northern industrial town, after the lynching of Samuel J. Bush in 1893. This work examines Bush’s efforts to save his own life and his commentary on his accuser. Thus, I treat him as an active agent rather than as a passive victim. Moreover, by examining the black community’s social networks, institutional structures, and leadership, I provide a detailed analysis of its racial-class capacities. By focusing on the organizing activities of the black community, this case study explores a ...


Black Athletes At The Millenium, Keith Harrison Mar 2000

Black Athletes At The Millenium, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

No abstract provided.


Chinese American Literature Since The 1850s, Xiao-Huang Yin Dec 1999

Chinese American Literature Since The 1850s, Xiao-Huang Yin

Xiao-huang Yin

Chinese American Literature since the 1850s traces the origins and development of the extensive and largely neglected body of literature written in English and in Chinese, assessing its themes and style and placing it in a broad social and historical context. This volume, shows how change and continuity in the Chinese American experience are reflected in the writings of immigrants from China and their descendants.


Cork And Community: Postwar Blackface Minstrelsy In The Midwest, Howard Sacks Dec 1999

Cork And Community: Postwar Blackface Minstrelsy In The Midwest, Howard Sacks

Howard Sacks

Nearly a century-and-a-half after urban professional entertainers first attained instant popularity for music, dance, and humor performed in blackface, amateur minstrels in the rural Midwest continued to pack school auditoriums and smalltown theaters with their homespun variety. Blackening their hands and faces with storebought makeup (the modern equivalent of the burnt cork of the nineteenth century), farmers and schoolteachers sang spirited renditions of “There's Nothin Like a Minstrel Show” mechanics and school board members donned tutus in an exotic ballet burlesque; and a realtor with a rich baritone sang his version of “Mammy,” a perennial favorite.