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History

Selected Works

Sebastian Braun

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun Aug 2019

Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

In Encounter on the Great Plains, Karen Hansen investigates Scandinavian immigrants and settlers who came to live on the post-allotment Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota. She does so through examining stories by Scandinavian as well as Dakota residents. As the subtitle indicates, Hansen is interested in the question of dispossession: Did the Scandinavians, among whom were her ancestors, contribute to the dispossession of the Dakotas? As she writes, “[w]hat does it mean when one group’s acquisition of land is predicated on the dispossession of the other?” (3). Her answer is multifaceted and reveals the complexities of lives ...


Usa, Sebastian Braun Aug 2019

Usa, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

Approximately 5.1 million people in the U.S., or 1.7% of the total population, identify as Native American or Alaska Native alone or in combination with another ethnic identity. Around 2.5 million, or 0.8% of the population, identify as American Indian or Alaska Native only.1 Five hundred and sixty-six tribal entities were federally-recognized at the beginning of 2015,2 and most of these have recognized national homelands. Twenty-three per cent of the Native population live in American Indian areas or Alaska Native villages. The state with the largest Native population is California; the place with ...


The United States, Sebastian Braun Dec 2010

The United States, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

According to the United States Census Bureau, approximately 4.9 million people in the U.S., or 1.6%, identified as Native American in combination with another ethnic identity in 2008. There are currently around 335 federally recognized tribes in the United States (minus Alaska), most of which have reservations as national homelands. More than half of American Indians live off-reservation, many in large cities.
American Indian nations are theoretically sovereign but limited by individual treaties and federal Indian law, which is in flux and often dependent on individual U.S. Supreme Court decisions. The government has treaty and trust ...


The United States, Sebastian Braun Dec 2009

The United States, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

According to the United States Census Bureau,1  approximately 4.9 million people in the U.S. identified as Native American in combination with another ethnic identity in 2008; that is around 1.6 percent of the total population. There are currently around 335 federally recognized tribes in the United States (minus Alaska).
American Indian nations are theoretically sovereign but limited by individual treaties and federal Indian law, which is in flux and often dependent on individual U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Tribal governments’ sovereignty is also limited by plenary power of the U.S. Congress, which can unilaterally change ...


The United States, Sebastian Braun Dec 2007

The United States, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

According to the United States Census Bureau 2007, 2,151,322 people in the United States (minus Alaska) identified as Native American only, and 4,006,160 people identified as Native American in combination with another ethnic identity. These numbers add up to 0.75% and 1.4% of the total population respectively. There are currently around 335 federally recognized tribes in the United States (minus Alaska). More than half of
American Indians live off-reservation, many in cities.  American Indian law includes individual treaties and federal
Indian law, which is in flux and often dependent on individual U.S. Supreme ...


Book Review: Mni Wakan Oyate (Spirit Lake Nation): A History Of The Sisituwan, Wahpeton, Pabaska, And Other Dakota That Settled At Spirit Lake, North Dakota, By Mark Diedrich. Fort Totten: Cankdeska Cikana Community College Publishing., Sebastian Braun Dec 2007

Book Review: Mni Wakan Oyate (Spirit Lake Nation): A History Of The Sisituwan, Wahpeton, Pabaska, And Other Dakota That Settled At Spirit Lake, North Dakota, By Mark Diedrich. Fort Totten: Cankdeska Cikana Community College Publishing., Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

Commissioned by Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Mark Diedrich has written a detailed history of the Spirit Lake Nation from an indigenous perspective. Writing history is an important part of exercising sovereignty, since the definition of what happened in the past is influential in bringing people into the future.


Book Review: Like The Sound Of A Drum. Aboriginal Cultural Politics In Denendeh And Nunavut, By Peter Kulchyski. Winnipeg: University Of Manitoba Press., Sebastian Braun Dec 2006

Book Review: Like The Sound Of A Drum. Aboriginal Cultural Politics In Denendeh And Nunavut, By Peter Kulchyski. Winnipeg: University Of Manitoba Press., Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

In this book, Peter Kulchyski explores the politics of three settlements in the former Northwest Territories of Canada, leading to a discussion of relations among internal communities and between those social groups and the state. The accounts consist of a string of personal stories taken from Kulchyski's long experiences with these communities, and the form of the text, one suspects, mirrors the politics: just as one of Kulchyski's theses is that "in Aboriginal self-government, the politics of form is of considerable importance" (15), the form of this text is also of considerable importance. This is emphasized by Kulchyski ...


Book Review: Crazy Horse. A Lakota Life, By Kingsley Bray. Norman: University Of Oklahoma Press, Sebastian Braun Dec 2006

Book Review: Crazy Horse. A Lakota Life, By Kingsley Bray. Norman: University Of Oklahoma Press, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

In the flurry of books on Crazy Horse, yet another text depicting the legendary Lakota's by now mythical life might seem superfluous at best, that is, if it truly is just another larger-than-life fictional biography. Luckily, Bray has written a text that reads as far removed from the usual Crazy Horse literature as possible.


Book Review: Indigenous Peoples And Diabetes. Community Empowerment And Wellness, By Mariana Leal Ferreira And Gretchen Chelsey Lang (Eds.). Durham: Carolina Academic Press, Sebastian Braun Dec 2005

Book Review: Indigenous Peoples And Diabetes. Community Empowerment And Wellness, By Mariana Leal Ferreira And Gretchen Chelsey Lang (Eds.). Durham: Carolina Academic Press, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

This book is a collection of essays on the causes and possible solutions to the growing and already vast epidemic of diabetes in indigenous communities. Although the title refers to indigenous people in general, most of the articles focus on the political and geographic area of North America including Hawaii. The book features one article on Reunion Island and one on Australia. This is not so much a criticism as it might serve as an explanation for the premises of the book, namely a political approach to an illness that affects indigenous populations more widely than non indigenous propulations. It ...