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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

“Peripheral Inclusion: Communal Belonging In Suriname’S Sephardic Community”, Aviva Ben-Ur Dec 2006

“Peripheral Inclusion: Communal Belonging In Suriname’S Sephardic Community”, Aviva Ben-Ur

Aviva Ben-Ur

This article compares the membership status of Eurafricans in the Portuguese Jewish communities of Curaçao and Suriname. In the former colony, free people of African origin were almost entirely barred from admission, whereas in Suriname manumitted Africans and their descendants were included as members, albeit sidelined to the margins, a phenomenon I term "peripheral inclusion."


“Peripheral Inclusion: Communal Belonging In Suriname’S Sephardic Community”, Aviva Ben-Ur Dec 2006

“Peripheral Inclusion: Communal Belonging In Suriname’S Sephardic Community”, Aviva Ben-Ur

Aviva Ben-Ur

This article compares the membership status of Eurafricans in the Portuguese Jewish communities of Curaçao and Suriname. In the former colony, free people of African origin were almost entirely barred from admission, whereas in Suriname manumitted Africans and their descendants were included as members, albeit sidelined to the margins, a phenomenon I term "peripheral inclusion."


We Speak And Write This Language Against Our Will’: Jews, Hispanics, And The Dilemma Of Ladino-Speaking Sephardim In Early 20th Century New York", Aviva Ben-Ur Dec 1997

We Speak And Write This Language Against Our Will’: Jews, Hispanics, And The Dilemma Of Ladino-Speaking Sephardim In Early 20th Century New York", Aviva Ben-Ur

Aviva Ben-Ur

This article explores interactions of Puerto Ricans and Spanish expats with Ladino-speaking Ottoman Jews (Sephardim) in New York during the first half of the twentieth century, as reported in the U.S. Ladino press. These immigrant periodicals demonstrate that Ladino and Spanish were for the most part mutually intelligible languages. Yes, Sephardim did not always welcome the overtures of Puerto Ricans or Spaniards,