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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

From Pain To Pillar: History And Identity Politics Of Asian-American Students And Youth In The 21st Century And Cultural Self Development Theory, Noah Kim Apr 2019

From Pain To Pillar: History And Identity Politics Of Asian-American Students And Youth In The 21st Century And Cultural Self Development Theory, Noah Kim

Undergraduate Honors Theses

With the Asian-American population growing at exponential rates, Asian-Americans are forced to face the reality of their place in society. As this processing of identity continues, more become passionate in their search, with some becoming empowered, others seek representation. But in the end, all the interviewees and those in my research sought a collective level movement. Though people were from all different walks to life, there was a sense of commonality and a recognition of the reality of the situation. While people recognized that the Asian-American identity was a socially constructed, there is also a strong sense of commonality that ...


White Plague, White City: Landscape And The Racialization Of Tuberculosis In Washington, D.C. From 1846 To 1960, Ivie Orobaton Apr 2019

White Plague, White City: Landscape And The Racialization Of Tuberculosis In Washington, D.C. From 1846 To 1960, Ivie Orobaton

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the relationship between health and racism in Washington D.C. during the 20th century with a particular focus on pulmonary tuberculosis in the African American community. Tuberculosis was a leading cause of death in the United States, but African Americans had even greater incidence of the disease than the white population. Contemporary commentators debated whether this was due to a difference in “racial fitness” or a difference in environmental conditions connected to housing. This thesis explores the evolution of theoretical approaches regarding racial disparity in the rates of tuberculosis in the United States, with particular attention to ...


Le Ventre De La Femme Sénégalaise: Control And Reclamation Of The Senegalese Female Body, From French Colonialism To Modern Healthcare, Leah Roemer Apr 2019

Le Ventre De La Femme Sénégalaise: Control And Reclamation Of The Senegalese Female Body, From French Colonialism To Modern Healthcare, Leah Roemer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In analyzing patriarchal structures and oppression of women, feminist theorists have long argued that society seeks to control women’s bodies and their sexualities. For women of color, this attempted control is intersectional; it overlaps with racial oppression. Accordingly, Patricia Hill Collins argued that Black women in America suffer under a matrix of domination that combines oppression based on gender and race. However, the United States is widely regarded as the most powerful country in the world. How do women in less powerful countries, subject to international intervention and laws, fare under the matrix of domination? I consider this question ...


Names Tell A Story: The Alteration Of Student Names At Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879-1890, Liliana Elliott Jan 2019

Names Tell A Story: The Alteration Of Student Names At Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879-1890, Liliana Elliott

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Using the administrative naming practices at Carlisle Indian Industrial School as a case study, this thesis illuminates the assimilation practices of the federal government towards Native American children in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Current historical scholarship on off-reservation, government-operated industrial schools between 1879 and 1918 takes little heed of naming practices at these institutions. The alteration of Native American student names sheds light on questions of assimilation, identity, and captivity in ways that advance the understanding of these industrial schools. Most importantly, it puts the experiences of individual students at center stage. The Anglicization of Native American ...


Cartographies Of Power: Unequal Urban Development And The Racialization Of Space In São Paulo, Jessica Hyman Dec 2018

Cartographies Of Power: Unequal Urban Development And The Racialization Of Space In São Paulo, Jessica Hyman

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This work aims first and foremost to add to the literature on urban politics and race in Brazil. Where other scholars have not so explicitly addressed the ever present ideology of whiteness in regards to spatial organization and displacement in Brazil, this piece aims to do so. I build off of the work of past scholars in reinforcing that the belief in the racial democracy of Brazil is in fact a myth. I do so by illustrating the processes of the racialization of space that occur in São Paulo’s favelas and their development. The right to the city —a ...


The Global War On Drugs. Ideological Perversion & Representation., Hope Ruskaup Jan 2018

The Global War On Drugs. Ideological Perversion & Representation., Hope Ruskaup

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In the 1980s, the Reagan administration sought to combat the rampant growth in the production, circulation, and consumption of illicit drugs globally with aggressive militaristic action. Despite its vehement intervention into and parallel to globalized capitalism, the drug trade was deemed socially and economically deviant. The Reagan administration imbued a rhetorical domain which seemingly justified the use of extremely oppressive cultural, social, and militaristic tactics against already marginalized populations. The collective memory of the War on Drugs in the Americas is forever influenced by this marking and portrayal of difference.

Media representations take on many forms and are direct products ...


A Case Study In The Interdisciplinary: The Role Of Anthropology, Archaeology And History In Academia And Museums, Alexnadra A. Rosenberg May 2017

A Case Study In The Interdisciplinary: The Role Of Anthropology, Archaeology And History In Academia And Museums, Alexnadra A. Rosenberg

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis will examine the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to anthropology, archaeology and history in both academic and museum settings. Using the “Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon” exhibit as a case study, the necessity of teaching from an interdisciplinary perspective at an undergraduate level, if not before is stressed. Specific attention is given to the subfield of archaeology, the role of oral histories and descendant communities in creating museum exhibitions and the ways in which the museum presents a historical narrative about a complex and emotionally charged topic to visitors who arrive with diverse ...


In Between And Nowhere At All: How An Autobiography Reveals Hybridity, Francesca H. Maestas Apr 2017

In Between And Nowhere At All: How An Autobiography Reveals Hybridity, Francesca H. Maestas

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Fadhma Amrouche’s autobiography, Histoire de ma vie, sheds light on the complex life of an Algerian Berber woman from a Muslim village who was born under the French colonial regime. Due to the unusual circumstances of her birth, that is, being the illegitimate daughter of a mourning widow, she was able to receive a French colonial education, through which she learned how to read and write in which case she was eventually allowed to obtain a job. Also because of the events surrounding her birth, she was forced to have to live amongst, and be raised by, Christians, which ...


"Unswerving Devotion To Truth And Duty": Southern Women And The Print Culture Of The Lost Cause, 1850-1920, Ashley Robles Jan 2017

"Unswerving Devotion To Truth And Duty": Southern Women And The Print Culture Of The Lost Cause, 1850-1920, Ashley Robles

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the role of southern women before, during, and after the Civil War in shaping the Lost Cause of the Confederacy. White women, as professional writers or amateur historians, actively supported the Lost Cause through their writings and their membership in organizations such as the United Daughters of the Confederacy. These women were drawn to the Lost Cause as a means of reasserting racial and gender norms of the prewar South, and were instrumental in forming the Lost Cause as the dominant memory of the Civil War. In contrast, black southern women also turned to writing as a ...


Western Shoshone Treaty Activism, Us Indian Claims Law & Human Rights Violations, Nathan Brien Jan 2017

Western Shoshone Treaty Activism, Us Indian Claims Law & Human Rights Violations, Nathan Brien

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This project follows the treaty-based legal efforts of sisters Mary and Carrie Dann in their fight to assert Western Shoshone land rights against the US government. Beginning with a 1952 claims case before the Indian Claims Commission, the US attempt to make restitutions for the wrongful taking of Western Shoshone lands itself threatened persistent Shoshone treaty rights. The Dann sisters, along with other, self-described Western Shoshone “traditionals”, undertook to reverse the federal liquidation of Shoshone treaty rights, engaging federal claims commissioners, attorneys, and courts along the way. Their legal activism relied heavily on the assertion of sovereign rights under the ...


Colonization To Construction: Bridging The Gap Between Ancient Chamorro, Spanish Colonial & Modern Architecture On Guam, Dominic J. Lizama May 2016

Colonization To Construction: Bridging The Gap Between Ancient Chamorro, Spanish Colonial & Modern Architecture On Guam, Dominic J. Lizama

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Guam is an island in the Marianas that, over time, has experienced a rich cultural history brought about by its exposure to colonization, natural disasters, warfare and the continual influx of people and culture. Therefore, the architecture that exists on the island is one that divides itself into four distinct styles with each as a response to external forces that affected the island. By researching each of these styles, one is able to fully understand the holistic view of Guam’s history in order to design architecture that reflects the past with anticipation for the future. This thesis works to ...


Understanding North Korea In The Korean Diaspora: Teaching North Korea To American Students, So Dam Hong May 2016

Understanding North Korea In The Korean Diaspora: Teaching North Korea To American Students, So Dam Hong

Undergraduate Honors Theses

My honors thesis is a teaching project on the topic of “Understanding North Korea in the Korean Diaspora,” which is designed to be part of Korean American Diaspora Studies (KADS), a class taught in spring 2016 at the College of William and Mary, or as a short individual class for Korean American and non-Korean American college students. I designed and developed this course and honors thesis to provide teachers and students with the opportunity to teach and learn about North Korea beyond preconceptions and stereotypes, which are constructed and maintained by the mainstream culture, by digging out the buried and ...


Arthur Matsu's College Years: Historicizing His 1920s Experiences, Benming Zhang May 2016

Arthur Matsu's College Years: Historicizing His 1920s Experiences, Benming Zhang

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Art Matsu, who graduated from The College of William and Mary in 1927, was its first Asian American student. But in recognizing that significance, we also need to examine the moments and circumstances that make him unique. This project further historicizes his experiences as a student, by attending to historical norms, trends, and attitudes that may still reflect upon Asian Americans today. By referring to relevant historical documents and scholarly works, as well as primary sources, I speculate on how attitudes and norms affected perceptions of Matsu in his day and how that historical moment continues to be of impact ...


The Effect Of Diversity Ideology On The Perception Of Political Candidates Varying By Race, Karyne Nichelle Williams May 2016

The Effect Of Diversity Ideology On The Perception Of Political Candidates Varying By Race, Karyne Nichelle Williams

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Previous research on person perception has examined how stereotypes can affect people’s judgments of outgroup members. Research has also shown that ideology is related to prejudice and judgments about outgroups. In the current study, we examine how judgments of outgroup members are affected by a colorblind ideology versus a multicultural ideology. In Study 1, we had a national sample of participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk (n = 107) rate a fictional Black and White candidate on judgments related to political qualities and personal traits and complete explicit attitude measures. Results indicated that colorblind attitudes led to more negative political ...


Black Genocide, Reproductive Control, And The Crisis Pregnancy Center Movement: A Conspiracy Narrative Of Racial Hegemonic Order, Jordan Taffet Apr 2016

Black Genocide, Reproductive Control, And The Crisis Pregnancy Center Movement: A Conspiracy Narrative Of Racial Hegemonic Order, Jordan Taffet

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Over the past several decades, many individuals, organizations, and movements have brought attention to the role of race within the setting of reproduction by highlighting the possibility of black genocide. In particular, the crisis pregnancy center movement has appropriated this narrative in order to fulfill a pro-life agenda. By tracing and comparing the histories of the black genocide narrative and the crisis pregnancy center movement, I underline the various vulnerabilities within the crisis pregnancy center movement's use of the black genocide narrative.


Civil Patrols, Race, And Repression In Guatemala, 1982-1996, Jeremy Ross Apr 2016

Civil Patrols, Race, And Repression In Guatemala, 1982-1996, Jeremy Ross

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Between 1981 and 1996, the Guatemalan military maintained a paramilitary system of “civil patrols” throughout rural Guatemala. During the years of 1982-1983, the period of most intense state violence during the Guatemalan civil war, the military systematically committed massacres in hundreds of rural communities, at times committing acts of genocide against the Maya populations of the affected areas. Following this violence, the military forced nearly every rural community to form a civil patrol composed of the community’s adult men, in turn forcing each patrols’ members to augment military operations and personally fight leftist guerrillas. The creation of civil patrols ...


Good Neighbor Renditions And The Enemy Alien: The Latin American Civilian Internees Of World War Ii And The Integrity Of The Good Neighbor Policy, Casey Vansise Jan 2016

Good Neighbor Renditions And The Enemy Alien: The Latin American Civilian Internees Of World War Ii And The Integrity Of The Good Neighbor Policy, Casey Vansise

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper concerns a series of “renditions” of ethnically Japanese, German and Italian internees from their countries of residency in Latin America to the custody of the United States during the Second World War which were enacted through the framework of the Good Neighbor Policy. Despite many revisionist popular and scholarly contentions that the Good Neighbor Policy was an inauthentic application of the rhetoric that it aspired to, which traditionally cast the United States’ relations with Latin America as characterized by an attitude of respectful rapprochement premised on mutual recognition of autonomy, this paper instead uses the case of the ...


"We Made You": The Contrived And Contested Nature Of Authenticity In American Folk And Hip Hop Subcultures, Kathryn E. Plunkett May 2015

"We Made You": The Contrived And Contested Nature Of Authenticity In American Folk And Hip Hop Subcultures, Kathryn E. Plunkett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The pursuit and preservation of authenticity has been of key importance to artists and musicologists throughout history. However, the emergence of a booming capitalist culture in the early twentieth century complicated the concept of authenticity and thus heightened intellectual interest. In particular, the American folk revival generated conflict over the term by demonstrating its dynamism — while some artists adhered to the strict, traditionalist, Old-Leftist canon of folk purists, younger artists increasingly commodified themselves and their music to fit in with a more commercial environment. More recently, the emergence of hip hop and its perpetually shifting parameters of “realness” have prompted ...


Momentary Memorials: Political Posters Of The Lebanese Civil War And Hezbollah, Megan Miller Jan 2014

Momentary Memorials: Political Posters Of The Lebanese Civil War And Hezbollah, Megan Miller

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Lebanese civil war (1975-1990) is a product of its diverse participating factions. With more than a dozen political, religious, and social parties, the streets of Lebanon became flooded with contradicting political imageries, influencing public perception of the ‘other’ and inciting military action. Their unique role in Lebanon’s political atmosphere allows such graphics to transcend mere propaganda to become physical sites of memorialization, despite their ephemerality. Posters exhibiting martyrs, political icons, and spiritual references control viewers’ field of vision and prompt their physical accumulation around the images, much like one would see at a funeral or sculptural memorial. These ...


"If One Finger Brought Oil, It Soiled The Others": The Ideas Of Cultural Orthodoxy And Critique And Subjectivity And Friendship In Things Fall Apart, Michael L. Katz Jan 2011

"If One Finger Brought Oil, It Soiled The Others": The Ideas Of Cultural Orthodoxy And Critique And Subjectivity And Friendship In Things Fall Apart, Michael L. Katz

Undergraduate Honors Theses

"The story of this man who had killed a messenger and hanged himself would make interesting reading. One could almost write a whole chapter on him. Perhaps not a whole chapter but a reasonable paragraph at any rate...He had already chosen the title of the book, after much thought: The Pacification of the Primitive Tribes of the Lower Niger."

Chinua Achebe's classic novel Things Fall Apart concludes with the above lines. The protagonist of the book, Okonkwo, has committed suicide, and upon finding the body, the English District Commissioner of the Lower Niger thinks that "this man," who ...