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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Panel #2: The Maine-Missouri Crisis And The Politics Of Slavery, Mary T. Freeman, Matthew Mason, Diane Mutti Burke, Patrick Rael May 2019

Panel #2: The Maine-Missouri Crisis And The Politics Of Slavery, Mary T. Freeman, Matthew Mason, Diane Mutti Burke, Patrick Rael

Maine Statehood and Bicentennial Conference

A panel that included three presentations:

African Americans and the Political Consequences of Maine Statehood, Mary T. Freeman

Doughface Pioneer: John Holmes of Maine, 1773-1843, Matthew Mason

Fire Bell in the Night: The Establishment of a Slave Society in Jefferson's Purchase, Diane Mutti Burke


Crosscurrents: The Daponte String Quartet Explores The Mixed Musics Of Early Maine, Daponte String Quartet May 2019

Crosscurrents: The Daponte String Quartet Explores The Mixed Musics Of Early Maine, Daponte String Quartet

Maine Statehood and Bicentennial Conference

A performance by musical artists Ferdinand "Dino" Liva (violin), Lydia Forbes (violin), Kirsten Monke (viola), and Myles Jordan (cello).

Program notes by Kirsten Monke provide the following background: When we learned about the notated songs of Membertou (c. early 1500s- 1611), a major shaman-chief of the Mi’kmaq nation, the idea for this program began to percolate. What diversity of music might there have been as so many different peoples explored, fished, and colonized Maine’s rocky coast and European influences began to permeate the land? Fragments of elegant china, unearthed at archaeological sites such as Fort Pemaquid, illustrate how ...


Liberty To Slaves: The Black Loyalist Controversy, Michael Anthony White May 2019

Liberty To Slaves: The Black Loyalist Controversy, Michael Anthony White

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Individuals of African descent who arrived in Nova Scotia during and after the War for American Independence have been the subject of extensive commentary by historians. Spurred by the rise of Social History in the 1970s, these individuals have increasingly been identified as a coherent group – particularly by the historian James W. St. G. Walker, whose pioneering 1976 monograph did a great deal to create the term “black Loyalist” as a category of analysis. In Walker’s wake many other researchers have expanded the concept, which now has a prominent place in the public historical memory of Nova Scotia. However ...


State Of Maine And The Passamaquoddy And Penobscot Tribes Financial Transactions Research Material, 1759-2013, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine Jan 2018

State Of Maine And The Passamaquoddy And Penobscot Tribes Financial Transactions Research Material, 1759-2013, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine

Finding Aids

This research was undertaken in the mid-1970s by Anthony M. (Tony) Kaliss to provide supporting data for use as a part of the land claims suit by the Passamaquoddy and Penobscot Tribes. The suit has long been settled and the tribes were federally recognized. Both tribes had been recognized and dealt with continuously since at least the 1700s first by the Massachusetts colony, then by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as a state and then the State of Maine when it separated from Massachusetts in 1820. This research focused entirely on financial relations. The purpose was to establish that there was ...


Being & Not Being Franco-American: The Perspective Of One 21st Century Millennial, Maegan Maheau Jan 2017

Being & Not Being Franco-American: The Perspective Of One 21st Century Millennial, Maegan Maheau

Franco-American Centre Franco-Américain Undergraduate Scholarship

I am attempting to share a collective analysis of self-explored thoughts as to where and why I have certain viewpoints or biases on whether “this” or “that” might account for my understanding of what a Franco-American is. The question of being and not being a Franco American is a collection of observations and inductions, both through my socially crafted subjective lens and by relating such matters beyond personal experience.


2016 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration, University Of Maine Student Life Oct 2015

2016 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration, University Of Maine Student Life

Cultural Affairs Distinguished Lecture Series

Alison Beyea is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Maine, where she oversees the organization's legal, legislative, public education and development activities. With 3,000 members, the ACLU of Maine is the state's oldest and largest civil liberties organization.

The state of the union from the Citizen's Perspective delivered by Alison Beyea will be the focus of a keynote address at the 20th annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast on Jan. 18, 2016 sponsored by the Greater Bangor Area NAACP and the University of Maine. Keynote Speaker Alison Beyea will speak on current national ...


Making It Work Before The Movement: African-American Community And Resistance In 1940s And 1950s Portland, Maine, Justus Hillebrand Jan 2015

Making It Work Before The Movement: African-American Community And Resistance In 1940s And 1950s Portland, Maine, Justus Hillebrand

Maine History

African Americans in Portland, Maine, in the 1940s and 1950s made up less than 0.5% of the population. As a consequence, discourse on race was more subtle than it was in other parts of the country. The Portland black community, as in other small northern New England cities, lacked the numbers for broad public or political action. Instead, African Americans developed individual and informal strategies of resistance aimed at broadening opportunities in education, employment, and housing. African Americans “made it work” by congregating in their own church, persevering in their own educational goals, operating their own businesses, and owning ...


A Child Of The Atlantic: The Maine Years Of John Brown Russwurm, Carl Patrick Burrowes Jul 2013

A Child Of The Atlantic: The Maine Years Of John Brown Russwurm, Carl Patrick Burrowes

Maine History

Celebrated in life as co-founder of America’s first black newspaper, John Brown Russwurm was the embodiment of an Atlantic Creole. Born in Jamaica to a white American father and a black Jamaican mother, as a young man Russwurm moved to North America. Throughout his teens and twenties, his “home” was southern Maine, and he was given a good secondary education there. After finishing school, Russwurm taught in several black schools in Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston. It was in these cities that he came into contact with America’s free black leaders, some of whom supported the movement ...


Creating An Indian Enemy In The Borderlands: King Philip’S War In Maine, 1675-1678, Christopher J. Bilodeau Jan 2013

Creating An Indian Enemy In The Borderlands: King Philip’S War In Maine, 1675-1678, Christopher J. Bilodeau

Maine History

In the borderlands space between New England and Québec, the Wabanaki Indians had their own reasons for getting embroiled in a conflict that started in southern New England, King Philip’s War (1675-1678). This essay argues that, ironically, the English vision of a monolithic Indian enemy was the key to Wabanaki success in this war. The Wabanakis were a heterogeneous group when it came to the issue of fighting the English, with many eager to join the fight, others ambivalent, and still others against. The English of Massachusetts Bay and Maine, however, treated the entire Wabanaki population as united under ...


The Maine Indian Land Claim Settlement: A Personal Recollection, John M.R. Paterson Jun 2012

The Maine Indian Land Claim Settlement: A Personal Recollection, John M.R. Paterson

Maine History

From 1971 to 1980, the state of Maine grappled with one of the greatest legal challenges ever before it. That challenge had its origin in a suit brought by the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy tribes against the U.S. Department of the Interior seeking the seemingly simple declaration that the department owed a fiduciary duty to the tribes based on a federal law adopted in 1790. That suit was eventually to lead to a suit by the U.S. Department of Justice against the state of Maine, and potentially 350,000 residents in the eastern two-thirds of the state, seeking return ...


A Company Of Shadows: Slaves And Poor Free Menial Laborers In Cumberland County, Maine, 1760 – 1775, Charles P.M. Outwin Jun 2012

A Company Of Shadows: Slaves And Poor Free Menial Laborers In Cumberland County, Maine, 1760 – 1775, Charles P.M. Outwin

Maine History

Although slaves and poor, free menial laborers were by no means a majority of the population in late colonial-era Maine, they represented a culturally and socioeconomically significant part of commercial society there, especially at Falmouth in Casco Bay (now Portland) and in coastal Cumberland County. This essay uncovers the lives of the Falmouth’s small slave population and its larger poor menial laborer population from 1760 up to the port city’s destruction by the British in 1775. The author was granted a Ph.D. in history from the University of Maine in 2009. He is a member of the ...


The Library Of Professor Meserve, Daniel Rosenberg Oct 2011

The Library Of Professor Meserve, Daniel Rosenberg

Maine History

Charles Francis Meserve was an early summer resident of Squirrel Island and an important educational reformer around the turn of the twentieth century. Charles married Fannie Philbrick, whose father, John W. Philbrick, built a house on Squirrel Island. Eventually, the Philbrick cottage passed to the Meserves and become home to their books.


The Governor’S Gallows: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain And The Clifton Harris Case, Jason Finkelstein Jun 2010

The Governor’S Gallows: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain And The Clifton Harris Case, Jason Finkelstein

Maine History

In 1867, Auburn was home to one of the most vicious murders committed in the state’s history. Clifton Harris, a southern black teenager, was corralled for questioning and within hours confessed to the crime. He was tried and convicted solely upon his own confession, without any evidence against him. Harris became only the second prisoner ever to be executed in Thomaston State Prison. Indeed, the de facto abolition of the death penalty had taken place nearly three decades earlier, but Governor Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain steadfastly proclaimed that he would carry out Harris’s death sentence in the face of ...


Burnt Harvest: Penobscot People And Fire, James Eric Francis Sr. Oct 2008

Burnt Harvest: Penobscot People And Fire, James Eric Francis Sr.

Maine History

The scientific and ethnographic record confirms the fact that in southern New England, Indians used fire as a forest management tool, to facilitate travel and hunting, encourage useful grasses and berries, and to clear land for agriculture. Scholars have long suggested that agricultural practices, and hence these uses of fire, ended at the Saco or Kennebec, with Native people east of this divide less likely to systematically burn their forests. This article argues that Native people on the Penobscot River used fire, albeit in more limited ways, to transform the forest and create a natural environment more conducive to their ...


A Letter From Joshua Cushman, Matthew Mason Oct 2008

A Letter From Joshua Cushman, Matthew Mason

Maine History

No abstract provided.


Book Reviews, Polly Welts Kaufman, Christian P. Potholm, Jean F. Hankins Jun 2008

Book Reviews, Polly Welts Kaufman, Christian P. Potholm, Jean F. Hankins

Maine History

Reviews of the following books: The Penobscot Dance of Resistence: Tradition in the History of a People by Pauleena MacDougall; Maine’s Visible Black History: The First Chronicle of its People by H. H. Price and Gerald E.Talbot; Borderland Smuggling: Patriots, Loyalists, and Illicit Trade in the Northeast, 1783-1820 by Joshua M. Smith.


My Mother Could Send Up The Most Powerful Prayer: The Role Of African American Slave Women In Evangelical Christianity, Sherry L. Abbott Jan 2003

My Mother Could Send Up The Most Powerful Prayer: The Role Of African American Slave Women In Evangelical Christianity, Sherry L. Abbott

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Evangelical Christianity swept through the South during the nineteenth century, permeating and redefining all aspects of social and cultural life. The traditional way to study this subject is through the history of the conversion of white women and African Americans, the power and expansion of certain denominations, and slaves' widespread use of religion as resistance. Yet something is missing within this history of Southern evangelical religion -the unique experience of African American women. This thesis addresses their experience, indicating that slave women found creative ways to assert their authority within immediate families and in their community. The study specifically focuses ...


Stories Of Canada: National Identity In Late-Nineteenth-Century English-Canadian Fiction, Elizabeth Hedler Jan 2003

Stories Of Canada: National Identity In Late-Nineteenth-Century English-Canadian Fiction, Elizabeth Hedler

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The search for a national identity has been a central concern of English-Canadian culture since the creation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867. In the late nineteenth century, English-Canadian concerns about Canadian identity and the need for distinctively Canadian stories resulted in the creation of a body of fiction that attempted to define Canadian nationhood and identity by depicting Canadian scenes, people, and situations. In the late nineteenth century, writers of fiction focused on defining the impact of Canada's unique land and heritage upon Canadian identity. Based on an extensive reading of these novels, this dissertation explores the ...


Changing Their Guardians: The Penobscot Indians And Maine Statehood, 1820-1849, Jason M. Dorr May 1998

Changing Their Guardians: The Penobscot Indians And Maine Statehood, 1820-1849, Jason M. Dorr

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Throughout the nineteenth century in the United States, Native American and European cultures were often in conflict, consequently, Native Americans found it necessary to transform their traditional practices in order to adhere to the ever-changing environment These transformations included altering their hunting and gathering patterns since land speculators and industrialists appropriated the land and its resources, and encouraged agricultural development. They had to reconstruct their religion to fit the new Christian worldview They also had to rethink the role of traditional tribal politics in order to adhere to the laws of emerging governments. Native Americans throughout the United States were ...