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Marshall University

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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

0859: Mr. And Mrs. Paul R. Cooley Sr. Civil Rights Era Newspaper Collection, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2020

0859: Mr. And Mrs. Paul R. Cooley Sr. Civil Rights Era Newspaper Collection, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains six newspapers from West Virginia, Virginia, and New York documenting historic events that occurred during the Civil Rights Movement, specifically during the March on Washington on August 29, 1963 and the events that occurred after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968.


The Cape Fear Ran Red: Memory Of The Wilmington Race Riot And Coup D'État Of 1898, Jacob Michael Thomas Jan 2019

The Cape Fear Ran Red: Memory Of The Wilmington Race Riot And Coup D'État Of 1898, Jacob Michael Thomas

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

On November 10, 1898 the city of Wilmington erupted in racial violence as the members of the white population massacred anywhere from twenty-five to a hundred of the black citizenry. The result of the Wilmington Race Riot was the reassertion of white supremacy in North Carolina and a flip in Wilmington’s population, as whites became the majority. This paper will argue that the events of the Wilmington Race Riot and Coup D’état came about from the direct interference of Wilmington’s white elite along with outside interference from Democratic Party Leaders across the state of North Carolina as ...


0817: Rikki Miller Collection, 2012-2014, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2014

0817: Rikki Miller Collection, 2012-2014, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection consists of research materials gathered by Rikki Miller while doing research on the Colored Orphan's Home and the Barnett Hospital and Nursing School, an African American hospital, in Huntington, West Virginia. Materials are primarily photocopies of articles, photographs, surveys, and reports from various sources. Also included is Miller’s final presentation titled, “Case Study: An Appalachian ‘Black Hospital’”


“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale Jun 2011

“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

History Faculty Research

In June of 1783, Spain’s newly-appointed Governor of Louisiana Estevan Miro convened a conference of southeastern Indians in Pensacola with representatives from the dominant regional Amerindian groups, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Creeks in attendance. Among the attendees at the West Florida congress was a small contingent of Chickamauga Cherokee, led by their principal chief Dragging Canoe. During the parlay, Governor Miro implored the Indians to “not be afraid of the Americans,” promised to provide guns and ammunition in their ongoing efforts to prevent the further loss of their lands, and urged them to “continue to fight against American ...


“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale Jan 2010

“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

History Faculty Research

Following the American Revolution, the new United States government and its citizenry greedily cast their eyes westward across the expansive trans-Appalachian frontier. The contest between the region’s native peoples, Anglo-American westerners, and Spanish colonists for the trans-Appalachian West began long before the first shots of the Revolution were fired at Lexington & Concord. From the near perpetual regional Indian warfare to the diplomatic maneuverings of Euroamerican backcountry leaders, the struggle to control the land the Indians called the “western waters” defined borderland relations for most of the 18th century. Historians have devoted a great deal of scholarly energy to chronicling ...


Appalachia’S Borderland Brokers: The Intersection Of Kinship, Diplomacy, And Trade On The Trans-Montane Backcountry, 1600-1800, Kevin T. Barksdale Oct 2008

Appalachia’S Borderland Brokers: The Intersection Of Kinship, Diplomacy, And Trade On The Trans-Montane Backcountry, 1600-1800, Kevin T. Barksdale

History Faculty Research

This paper and accompanying historical argument builds upon the presentation I made at last year’s Ohio Valley History Conference held at Western Kentucky University. In that presentation, I argued that preindustrial Appalachia was a complex and dynamic borderland region in which disparate Amerindian groups and Euroamericans engaged in a wide-range of cultural, political, economic, and familial interactions. I challenged the Turnerian frontier model that characterized the North American backcountry as a steadily retreating “fall line” separating the savagery of Amerindian existence and the epidemic civility of Anglo-America. On the Turnerian frontier, Anglo-American culture washed over the Appalachian and Native ...


In Defense Of Colonel Richard P. Roberts, Commanding Officer Of The Pennsylvania 140th Regiment, Gregory Jason Bell Jan 2004

In Defense Of Colonel Richard P. Roberts, Commanding Officer Of The Pennsylvania 140th Regiment, Gregory Jason Bell

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Richard P. Roberts was the colonel of the Pennsylvania 140th regiment from its organization in September 1862 until his death at Gettysburg in July 1863. During this time period, Captain David Acheson of Company C fostered a “growing dislike” for the colonel that led him to portray the colonel negatively in his writings. Unfortunately for the colonel’s reputation, Acheson’s letters have been widely published, leading at least one historian to accept Acheson’s poor opinion of the colonel as fact. However, other primary sources exist which collectively demonstrate a positive regimental opinion of the colonel and further suggest ...


0690: James Wilson Papers, 1842-1854, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0690: James Wilson Papers, 1842-1854, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains a color copy of a bill of sale (1842) for two slaves and receipt (1854) for one slave, livestock, and other purchases by James Wilson, Cabell Couny, Virginia (now West Virginia) farmer. Individuals mentioned in the collection include Thomas M. Shelton, John M. Rece, and James C. Wilson, Celia (no age listed, 1854 document), Minerva (18 years old?, 1842 document), and Edmund (13 years old, 1854 document).


0691: Carl Burrowes Papers, 1988-1997, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0691: Carl Burrowes Papers, 1988-1997, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains files related to the organization of the West Virginia Black History Conference and the Alliance for the Collection, Preservation, and Dissemination of WV’s Black History, as well as other items related to African American history in West Virginia. Material includes notes on presenters and topics as well as clippings, newsletters, and correspondence. The collection is divided into three series: Series I, Conference Materials; Series II, Additional Black History Material; and Series III, Alliance for the Collection, Preservation, and Dissemination of WV’s Black History.


Oral History Interview: Lowell E. Long, Lowell E. Long Nov 1998

Oral History Interview: Lowell E. Long, Lowell E. Long

Oral Histories

Lowell E. Long’s interview focuses on the region of Appalachia: its location, environments, people, and identity. Mr. Long was born in April 1941 in War, McDowell County, WV. His family moved to East Liverpool, OH, after World War II, and relocated to Huntington, WV, in January 1945. In the audio clip provided, Mr. Long discusses what it means to be Appalachian and focuses on family bonds and sense of belonging in the region. During his interview, he describes his family’s use of folk medicine. Mr. Long provides descriptions of the segregated neighborhoods and schools of Huntington, WV, during ...


Integration And Athletics: Integrating The Marshall University Basketball Program, 1954-1969, George M. Reger Jan 1996

Integration And Athletics: Integrating The Marshall University Basketball Program, 1954-1969, George M. Reger

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

In 1954, Marshall College followed the national law that banned segregation in the school systems of the United States. The law included the integration of athletic programs. While only a small part of the process, athletic programs often presented integration on a more visible stage than the integration of classrooms.


An Appeal For Racial Justice : The Civic Interest Progressives' Confrontation With Huntington, West Virginia And Marshall University, 1963-1965, Bruce A. Thompson Jan 1986

An Appeal For Racial Justice : The Civic Interest Progressives' Confrontation With Huntington, West Virginia And Marshall University, 1963-1965, Bruce A. Thompson

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

In 1963, the shock waves of the sit-in movement and the growing black unrest throughout the country reached Huntington. This growing discontent with the status quo of segregation and racial discrimination and the impulse from the sit-in movement for direct, non-violent protest combined to mobilize several students at Marshall University who formed the Civic Interest Progressives (CIP), a biracial civil rights group.